nasty cat urine smell

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Old 04-11-08, 07:15 PM
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nasty cat urine smell

I used to have a cat that would pee in a corner in my upstairs. The cat is gone the carpet has been clean both by me several times and once professionally. However, as the weather is getting warmer the smell is creeping out.

We don't have the money to get new carpet right now but we do have a newborn that has to sleep in that area. I'm going to pull the carpet up very soon and put down a remenat until we have the money to get it all done. I'm afraid that the urine has soaked into the wood.

If I paint that would will that effectively seal the smell in and protect the new carpet when we have the money to get it?

Thanks for your help in advance

Scoop Burt
 
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Old 04-11-08, 07:45 PM
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Urine settles not only downward but outward 3-5 times affected surface area. Carpet can be cleaned, but carpet backing, cushion, and subfloor beneath cannot be cleaned. Urine odor will remain and will be more noticeable on warm, humid days.

Removal of carpet and cushion and sealing odors into subfloor will eliminate odors. Too, cats sometimes spray along baseboards and onto walls. Using a primer/sealer and repainting will seal in odors.

If you have a baby, you will want to use low/no VOC (volatile organic compounds) products that off gas odors. Many carpets also off gas. Look for low/no VOC carpet remnants. Or, keep baby out of room until the 'new' smell (off gassing of VOCs) dissipates. You can expedite off gassing by opening windows and using fans to move odors outdoors.
 
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Old 04-12-08, 07:17 AM
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Cat urine odor

I too am having this problem. I purchased this house in November....while looking at it I never noticed any smell. However while remodeling the electricity was shut off and as the house heated up.....whew. I was replacing carpet on the stairs. Apparently two cats had been left alone in the house on their own for about six months. The owners would stop in to feed, but I think the kids were in charge of cleaning the liter box and my guess is they never did. The cats apparently used the stairs as their own private bathroom. When we ripped up the carpet....it was awful. I kiltzed the wood on the stairway before we carpeted as well as the cement along the floor underneath. On humid days (I live in Louisiana....need I say more?) I can still smell it.
A woman on another site said that she rented an ozone machine to "shock" the air. You must leave the house and remove pets and plants to do this. I think it only takes hours not days though. She said she has never had a problem again. I think I'm going that route next.
 

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Old 04-12-08, 08:56 AM
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Cat owners- this is simple. Use an enzyme based deodorizer. After you clean it with an extractor, pour it full strength over the soiled area. Let it soak down through the carpet, into the mat and onto the floor. Do what the cat did. You don't need to pull the carpet up, let gravity work for you. The friendly bacteria in the enzymes will eat the odor causing bacteria.
If O3 is for the air only, it won't help the problem in the carpet, mat or floor.
 
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Old 04-12-08, 10:07 AM
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Thanks for all the info. Especially about the off gassing and the fact that painting it will seal the smell away for good.. The cat has a new home so I'm not worried about it happening again. As for deodorizing, the carpet needs replaced for other reasons so the painting of the floor and a remenat that I can use in the basement workshop after we actually get the carpet replaced is going to work great for us.

Thanks again for all the answers and quick response
 
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Old 04-12-08, 06:18 PM
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Never pour a cleaner directly into the carpet. Overwetting of carpet can cause delamination of carpet backing. While enzyme cleaners are effective for tackling pet mess and odor problems and the problem areas kept damp with cleaner to give enzymes time to do their job of digesting organic stains and odors, they are not to be poured into carpet.
 
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Old 04-13-08, 01:16 AM
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If this case pulling of the carpet...replacement of the padding and clean and sealing of the subfloor is needed. Leaving the carpet in place and trying to clean will NOT produce the results you are looking for. Also check for drywall damage 6 inches up from floor...wooden baseboards may also need to be replaced.
 
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Old 04-19-08, 11:39 AM
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Well, here is my two cents worth.

Get a good enzyme cleaner, soak the area, either by spraying it till it is saturated and then cover with a damp towel.... Do this for up to seven days and the odor will be gone. No need to tear up carpet, pad and all that, just give this a try.
We have been selling enzymes and other cleaning chemicals for about 12 years now and have not had one time this has not worked.

Look for a proguct called "Liquid Alive Odor Digester" by Dymon.

It works great!
Finally, this is just my experience and opinion, so I hope the other posters don't get all upset...
Good luck and take care
Dan
 
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Old 04-19-08, 04:49 PM
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Originally Posted by username taken View Post
and the fact that painting it will seal the smell away for good..
Not just any paint/primer will seal the odor! Latex paint/primers won't do a good job at all. Sometimes an oil base coating will seal it enough but a pigmented shellac [like zinnser's BIN] is the best for sealing stains and odors.
 
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Old 04-19-08, 07:48 PM
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Gonna have a real hard time convincing me you can clean this without pulling up the carpet. We deal with this all the time and have a procedure: pull up the carpet. Inspect the pad and replace if the urine soaked into it. Inspect the subfloor and seal if the urine soaked into it. Clean both sides of the carpet and tack back into place.
 
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Old 04-20-08, 10:12 AM
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Mitch17- I cleaned carpet for 25 years. I would clean the carpet as best you can with extraction and pull up as much as you can, then take the enzyme based deodorizer, pour it over the stained area and work it in. It will get a little wet, but doesn't need to be soaked. Owner didn't say there was a pad, but if so, and being in the corner, they could pull it back, treat directly the pad and the floor, and let it work. It will take care of the odor.
 
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Old 04-20-08, 01:08 PM
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When dealing with cat urine..its just best if the odor is that bad. To pull carpet, toss pad and clean and seal subfloors..

I also have done carpets...and trust me when i say the amount of labor that you will have with topical cleaning will not be worth it.. Just pull it and forget it.

I have had clients in the past were they will tell me the say them..treat in place...even with a water claw and gallons of water..it didnt give good results.
 
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Old 04-20-08, 01:16 PM
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Docduck- you don't need gallons on water. YOu only need to clean the top and then, using an enzyme based deodorizer, pour enough on the top making sure it goes all the way to the floor. Work it in with your fingers and let it set for several days. The enzymes only will kill the odor causing bacteria. You can't kill the odor with lots of water.
 
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Old 04-20-08, 08:42 PM
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I am not questioning your experience...but in reality..do you think it is safe to leave anything wet/damp for serveral days? Clients will not allow that, that would risk subfloor damage if it does soak thru. You have to remove the source of the odor..if cleaning using a topical method..you would have to use more water than usual..because your trying to pull the source thru the carpet, padding and possibly were it has reached the subfloor. Hence why many of us here have suggested pulling the carpet back. Our job as moderators is to suggest to members the best possible solutions, in our experience, to their problems or anything that would save them time/money. Cat urine has to be one of the hardest things to get rid of..not only due to just the odor but the many effected surfaces.

I do not think that we can really add anything to this topic that hasnt already been said. So, therefor, I am closing it to new replies. Thanks to add that has participated. If needed for a new question please post a new topic specfic to your problem.
 
 

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