hair spray on corian


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Old 11-21-10, 08:16 PM
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hair spray on corian

is there a simple way to get it off ?

thanx
 
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Old 11-22-10, 04:35 AM
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Should find some help here:

Caring for DuPont? Corian«
 
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Old 11-22-10, 08:18 AM
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Alcohol should remove hair spray and not affect the surface.
 
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Old 11-22-10, 08:43 AM
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Alcohol is the solvent in hair spray, so I'd go with Vic's suggestion
 
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Old 11-22-10, 06:05 PM
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thanx, that did it

now, i just have to shine it up. i love my wife, but sometimes she does care to take care of things
 
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Old 11-29-10, 06:47 PM
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Originally Posted by condo-owner View Post
sometimes she does care to take care of things
that should say "does not take care of things"

anyway. i busted out the buffer, auto detailing type. put some SCRATCH-X on it.

BAMMMM !!! WHAT A SHINE !!!
 
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Old 11-29-10, 07:34 PM
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Condo-owner:

What kind of alcohol did you use?

Methanol, denatured ethanol, vodka, iso-propyl?

I'm surprised that if water didn't work. It seems to wash hair spray out of hair well.
 
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Old 11-29-10, 08:08 PM
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isopropyl 70%. worked like a charm.

never tried water, so idk. wife said windex works, didn't try that either.

but you should see em now (i did mine also). 3D depth of shine.
 
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Old 11-30-10, 07:28 AM
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Originally Posted by Nestor View Post

I'm surprised that if water didn't work. It seems to wash hair spray out of hair well.
i was just thinking about that statement. i'm thinking its not the water, but the soap.
but idk, didn't try any of them.

i keep looking at the sinks. wow, what a difference. and i didn't think mine was that bad.
 
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Old 11-30-10, 08:45 AM
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Actually....water doesn't work very well with hairspray. Hairspray is basically like a lacquer. Ever see water rings on a table...most likely a lacquer finish. It will discolor it but not really remove it.

I remember way back growing up my Mom would use Final Net or similar and would have to soak combs in alcohol and use an old toothbrush to remove the white buildup from the hairspray.

Windex has alcohol, ammonia, and surfactants (I think) so that would probably also work. When you shower and shampoo....you are using hot water...and I bet many shampoos have alcohol (or something that performs the same function) in them.
 
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Old 11-30-10, 07:40 PM
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Denatured alcohol is what we use to clean Corian before seaming with acrylic adhesive or sealing edges with silicone or other caulk. It can be used anytime for cleanup. Just don't use acetone or most petroleum solvents. It's also fine to use bleach on it, and can be very helpful removing stains in the sink, as well as a green Scotch Bright pad with Bon Ami cleanser.
 
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Old 11-30-10, 07:57 PM
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Hair spray needs to dry fast, so that you can set your hair before it gets a mind of it's own. That's probably why they use a fast evaporating solvent (like methanol, ethanol or isopropyl alcohol) to thin it.

I'd probably use a white Scotchbrite pad on Corian or marble, but I'd be reluctant to use a green one. Scotchbrite pads are made of nylon fiber, but most 1/4 inch thick Scotchbrite pads use nylon fiber that's been impregnated with abrasives. The only Scotchbrite pads with no abrasives inside the fiber are the white ones. I'd be concerned that the abrasive would dull the shine of Corain or marble (which isn't a very hard rock).

3M makes Scotchbrite pads in a much wider selection that most people are aware of. If you go to any place listed under Machine Shop Equipment & Supplies, you'll find a variety of oversize Scotchbrite pads, all 1/4 inch thick, with various kinds of abrasives in them. Machinists use these to polish metal after machining it.

And, if you go to any place listed under Janitorial Equipment & Supplies, you'll find even more Scotchbrite pads, this time all 1 inch thick, called "Doodle Bug Pads" for cleaning and stripping floors, mostly. In the case of Doodle Bug Pads, there won't be any abrasive in any of the nylon fiber. The pads get their aggressiveness from how stiff the nylon fiber is, not the abrasives inside the fiber.
 
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Old 11-30-10, 10:29 PM
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I was suggesting the green pad for cleaning the Corian sink, not the countertop. It will leave the sink with a flat appearance which will mask scratches & dings in the sink bottom. A shiny finish shows everything in the reflection. For the tops we polish with red or gray pads which are much finer than green. For maintenance a white pad works fine on the top, but I stand by my recommendation of green pad on a sponge with Bon Ami, or similar, for the sink.
 
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Old 12-01-10, 07:28 AM
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guys, thanx for the quality info/tips. this info will surely help others and myself.

CNTRTOP
with all due respect. i somewhat disagree with saying a "flat" finish will hide scratches. yes, it will hide some, but make others stand out. our sinks were somewhat dull(mine), to pretty much "flat" (wifes). and scratches were easily seen, didn't even have to look for them.

now, with the highly shined finish that is on them, it hides all the scratches(none are deep). because the shine glares so much that light reflections hide things. and the shine makes the corian look 2" deep, this also hides things. water spots are even harder to see now. not only that, the color of the corian was enhanced.
sure, if you go "looking" for scratches, they can be found (i didn't try to get em all out) but you have to go looking for them.

now, i say this with the limited experience i have with this stuff.
and, as always = ymmv


btw. both of these were 1 piece. i bought it off craigslist for $100.
cut a piece out of the center, polished 1 end. and put em in.
 
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Old 12-01-10, 07:36 AM
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Old 12-01-10, 05:21 PM
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Condo-owner:

Nice sink.

But, I gotta side with CNTRTOP on this one. Take a look at the reflection of the wall mounted lights on the flat top surface of your Corain. If there were any scratches on that flat surface where the bulbs reflect from, they'd stand right out and you'd notice them without looking. That's because when it comes to stuff like this, your eye doesn't actually see a scratch. What it notices is the abberation in the way light reflects off that surface, and the brain figures out that the cause of that abberation is a scratch. So, you're not actually seeing the scratch, but the telltale abberation in the way light reflects off that surface.

By roughening the surface of the sink bowl, you're essentially camoflaging tiny scratches and nicks. There's terminology for this stuff. The way your wall mounted lights reflect off the flat Corian surface is called "specular" reflection. The way a light bulb would reflect off a school chaulk board is called "diffuse" reflection. By making the surface of the bowl rough, you camoflage tiny scratches and nicks that are about the same size and depth as the surrounding surface roughness of the bowl. That's because your eye doesn't notice any difference in the way light reflects of the scratch or nick as it does off the surrounding area.

Just about all new homes come with dead FLAT paint on the walls. That's not because flat paint is better in any respect; it's harder to clean. But, what flat paint does is camoflage defects in the drywalling. That's because your eye doesn't notice any abberation in the reflection of the light off the walls if the whole wall is reflecting light diffusely. Any minor defect in the drywalling, such as a bit of taping paper that's been primed and painted simply won't be as noticably because you actually have to see the paper to know it's there. Whereas if the walls were painted with a high gloss paint, the outline of the paper would cause an abberation in the reflection off the surrounding smooth surface, and you'd be much more likely to notice it. Building contractors paint the interior walls flat simply because it reduces the number of call backs and complaints from the new home owners that buy their houses.
 

Last edited by Nestor; 12-01-10 at 06:09 PM.
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Old 12-01-10, 06:23 PM
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well, Nes

on the wall paint thing. i completely agree. i am doing touchups right now, with paint from the same can. but when it goes on the wall, it is just a little different. i did a spot that i didn't go all the way to the corner, and the blend is invisible to everyone but me.


but, i stand with what i say about the corian. i lived with what it looked like before, for years. i saw the little scratches with no problem in the dulled finish. now, perhaps the finish was not matte enough to hide the scratches, as you guys say, idk. but now, with it as shinny as it is, i have to HUNT for the scratches. and i hunt in the light reflection that you see. there are scratches there, but in no way shape or form do they stick out like a sore thumb, they hide. now, these are buffed scratches, so the scratch edge is not sharp. a fresh scratch could be a different story.
 
 

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