Tried to season cast iron but made a sticky mess

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Old 12-30-15, 08:47 AM
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Tried to season cast iron but made a sticky mess

Where did I go wrong?
I have a Lodge cast iron griddle plate that I like except for its rough texture. I sanded it down and made it much smoother and then I needed to re-season it. I googled seasoning cast iron and follow directions to grease the pan with shortening and put it in a 400 degree oven for 45 minutes. Repeat 3 times. After this I ended up with a sticky glaze on the griddle that will not wipe off.
Apparently I need to do this a different way. What is best?
 
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Old 12-30-15, 10:20 AM
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Lodge has their own instructions: https://www.lodgemfg.com/use-and-car...e-and-care.asp and they say using too much shortening or oil will leave the pan sticky. They also say to heat it upside down to prevent any oils from pooling.
I use a paper towel to wipe it down first, so's there's just a film left.
 
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Old 12-30-15, 03:23 PM
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Sanding it was an error. It's those "pores" in the rougher surface that allow a properly seasoned CI pan to be almost non-stick.
 
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Old 12-30-15, 03:53 PM
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Gunguy I have several cast iron skillets and griddles and the best ones (no sticking) are smooth. The worst have an almost pebble finish--like this particular Lodge plate. Sanding doesn't seal the pores.
 
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Old 12-31-15, 03:52 AM
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It's been a long time since I seasoned a cast iron skillet but I've never 'greased' it more than once before putting it back in service. I wonder if boiling some water in it would remove the excess oil ?
 
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Old 12-31-15, 09:01 AM
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Dish soap (like Dawn) and water. I know, cast iron and water aren't supposed to mix so maybe only as the last resort.
 
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Old 12-31-15, 04:59 PM
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Soap and water won't cut this--it's like a hard glaze now.
I need to strip it with a SS scrubby like in the Lodge instructions.
I missed the part about inverting the oiled pan and in the video I watched this was not done.

Just too much of a good thing...I'm sure it will turn out fine once I go out fetch that steel scrub ball.
 
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Old 12-31-15, 05:23 PM
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Inherited a cast iron skillet from my mother and it was horribly crusted. Cleaned it inside and out with "Easy Off" oven cleaner and then sanded the inside with 600 grit wet-o-dry paper on a 1/4 sheet palm sander. Got it super smooth. I then re-seasoned the pan using Crisco and baking it for about 30 minutes at 350*F.
The first pan of cornbread I cooked in it slipped around so much I almost spilled it in floor. Absolutely "no stick".
It worked for me.
Got another as a gift from elec co-op and it was rough as 60 grit paper.
Sanded and seasoned it using same method as above. First time of use it was a good non-stick. Gets better with each use.
Wash with dishwashing liquid and rinse then coat with oil. Store them with oil coating. If it smells stale then wash it and re grease before using.
Really like the cast iron.
Always store with them oiled or greased.

RR
 
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Old 12-31-15, 05:55 PM
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This is about the best post I ever read RR.
I've been fighting this cast iron for years. I love the way it cooks, but can't master the seasoning.
 
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Old 12-31-15, 06:04 PM
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Cleaned it inside and out with "Easy Off" oven cleaner
Be sure you use the old heavy duty easy off with lye. The made for real men version not wimpy environmentally safe stuff. Do it outside and wear heavy rubber gloves. Don't inhale the fumes.
 
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Old 12-31-15, 06:36 PM
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Handyone

This is about the best post I ever read RR.
I've been fighting this cast iron for years. I love the way it cooks, but can't master the seasoning.
I appreciate the bouquet.

Been using cast iron for many years. I love cornbread and it is one of the worst foods to stick. To preserve my reputation and sanity I now place a circle of parchment paper in bottom of oily skillet before pouring in cornbread batter. (my bride likes my cast iron and will use it without giving it proper care. She comes with an overdose of cleanliness gene and scrubs the cast iron with detergent and then doesn't re-oil as required) If she hasn't used my skillet I may forego the parchment paper.
Keeping the cast iron oiled is the KEY to non-stick cooking.
Best of luck on your cooking endeavors!

ray2047

Be sure you use the old heavy duty easy off with lye. The made for real men version not wimpy environmentally safe stuff. Do it outside and wear heavy rubber gloves. Don't inhale the fumes.
Ray has the right idea.

Mama would cook her cast iron upside down over a wood fire in backyard to de-grease them and then re-season the pan.

RR
 
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Old 12-31-15, 06:52 PM
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I recently spent some time on business in San Marcos, TX. Had some BBQ, the owner took me on a tour of the pits. Had some questions for him also.... Good Stuff.
 
 

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