Black Mold on Aluminium window surrounds and fittings! GRRR!

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Old 10-22-16, 05:33 PM
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Black Mold on Aluminium window surrounds and fittings! GRRR!



Good morning from New Zealand. I'm a newcomer to these forums and hope someone can help me with my hard black Mold problem.

I am in the process of moving into a house that has obviously not been ventilated very well, (if at all) and condensation has taken its toll on the aluminium window surrounds, the rubbers and the latch fittings.

I've been using white vinegar and baking soda with a toothbrush and the other "green" approaches which have proven to be successful on a couple of them but
I have a couple that are being very stubborn in two of the bedrooms, one in the kitchen, and one in the laundry. So bad that I can't even get the ****** things
open. I've tried with hydrogen peroxide too, but don't think it's strong enough for this job. I wondered too, if as much as I hate it, would it be safe to use a chlorine bleach??

Has anybody got any other advice of how I can remove this horribly unhealthy (and very inconvenient) hardened muck???

Any suggestions will be very welcome - thank you! I'm going nuts here!
 
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Old 10-22-16, 06:19 PM
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First, almost all mold looks black. Very few molds are toxic. So while it's black I wouldn't freak out.

When in doubt use some chlorine bleach. I would start with a diluted solution and soak the area so it can soak into the microscopic cracks in the paint and into the pores of the aluminum. Use a old tooth brush to scrub the area and wipe off the dirty remains. If that doesn't work I would try a stronger bleach (chlorine) concentration.
 
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Old 10-22-16, 06:31 PM
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Thank you Pilot Dane, appreciate your prompt reply, I'll give that a try!

Edited to add - it's a YES from me! I've just done the laundry and toilet window surrounds and latches, and all the surfaces of the frames and tricky little grooves and the latches are looking good now. I use a very thin pointed bamboo kebab stick to get into those tricky little corners and grooves, and they worked well too. I bash the ends a bit with a hammer sometimes and that makes a really nice stiff little brush for loosening gunk and cleaning all sorts of track etc grooves, such as on window and sliding narrow cupboard door tracks.

Thanks again Pilot Dane!
 

Last edited by Jay Nanny; 10-22-16 at 08:10 PM.
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Old 10-22-16, 09:25 PM
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And until you replace those old aluminum framed windows with new vinyl, fiberglass or composite framed windows this is always going to be an issue.
 
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Old 10-22-16, 10:35 PM
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Actually Joecaption, they are not that old, certainly not as old as the ones in the house I sold, which were in tip top condition after many years, because I looked after them and my house, which was always well ventilated, and regularly cleaned. Any condensation on the windows on winter mornings was, as now, always quickly removed, and I always have windows open, winter and summer, day and night if it's just a tiny bit to lessen the consequences of condensation.

And, there's no way I could afford new windows anyway! I simply won't neglect the current Windows the way they have been neglected by the past owner, and my next step is to remove the rubbers and have them re-done.

New windows are absolutely no option for me, as I simply cannot not afford them!

Thank you for your comments.
 
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Old 10-23-16, 04:21 AM
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While new windows would be more efficient as long as you clean the old ones occasionally there shouldn't be a problem with keeping the mold at bay. The biggest issue with metal windows is the transfer of heat/cold thru the metal causing condensation. Mold needs moisture and heat to grow.

Bleach is my go to product for cleaning mold and mildew as it's cheap and effective. I generally cut the bleach in half [or more] with water.

btw - welcome to the forums!
 
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Old 10-23-16, 05:31 PM
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Thank you for your welcome and comments Marksr. The ones I have done are looking pretty good now, so on with the rest of them. Fortunately, we're heading into summer now way down under so not expecting any condensation problems for a good while yet.

When a neighbour came over to introduce herself, she said to me, "I've lived next door for 5 years, and I have NEVER seen the windows or ranch sliders open before, until your son came a couple of weeks ago and started the renovations.

But today is oven cleaning day! Ugh! Another monumental task! Did the stove tops yesterday, and this morning have begun on the oven. Think I might need a concrete drill for this one - again, never seen anything like it before. Needless to say, I've been making good use of my microwave, slow cooker and electric frypan.

My initial instinct was to just get shot of it straight way, and buy a new one, but everything is so expensive these days, and I'm already over my renovation budget, then I thought, no - give it a go first, so the great oven clean-up has begun. With the bottom!

First of all it's 1 cup of washing soda (soda ash) and one cup of baking soda (bicarbonate) mix them together and sprinkle it over to cover the oven floor, avoiding the element. Then spray it with water to dampen, close door then respray every couple of hours, still closing door, till bedtime, then respray, close it, and leave overnight. In the morning, there'll be a brown mess, just scoop it all up into a bucket, rinse it out, and scrub off any baked up gunk that's left.

If your oven is in a really bad way, (as mine is) and has a lot of baked-on grime and grease, top, back and sides, just use soda ash and add some white vinegar on hard-to-shift grime. Let it fizz for 10 minutes then scrub with steel wool. Keep applying both the soad ash and the vinegar and scrubbing until all the grime has gone.

You won’t get a headache from the fumes, or be polluting your house, but do wear rubber gloves as the washing soda can be quite tough on the hands!

Both these oven cleaning tips, and more, are from NZ's own Green Goddess, at Wendyls.co.nz

I'm about to start the second phase this afternoon on the sides and the back and the "ceiling" of the oven.
 
 

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