Wireless Intercom Installation Problem


  #1  
Old 04-26-03, 11:31 PM
M Chew
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Unhappy Wireless Intercom Installation Problem

I bought a set (2 units) of GE wireless intercom for two rooms. According to the manual, they r supposed to communicate with each other via the power lines that the units are plugged into. The problem is that the two rooms are fed from two separate hot live wires from outside of house. So the two intercom units could not communicate with each other. I was told that some kind of bridging will need to be done to "link" up the two hot wires. Anyone care to advise on what this means and how to do it?

Thanks
Chew
 
  #2  
Old 05-03-03, 10:12 AM
M
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If you go to anyplace that sells home automation gadgets (Radio Shack is most likely available), there is a device for bridging the two halves of an electrical system so that signals can pass between the phases. They are generally pretty simple to install.
 
  #3  
Old 12-31-03, 03:11 PM
B
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I have been having the same type of problem with my wireless fm intercom systems. I have one circuit in the basement that is connected to the sub-panel that does not work on one or two circuits upstairs.

They call the products phase couplers...and actually sell one that plugs into any 220 volt plug and has an outlet built in the device is passive.

Check it out.... * Edited - Link is not valid - PM me before resubmitting this link - Thanks *
30 bucks!
I may have to try one...and if it doesn't fix it, get a refund.
They say to test if it's the signal between devices that are out of phase, turn on your electric oven or dryer (must be electric of course) and try the unit...when the 220 vold appliance is on, it acts as a phase coupler and will work while the appliance is on.
 

Last edited by SafeWatch; 01-01-04 at 10:10 PM.
  #4  
Old 01-01-04, 12:32 PM
R
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You will find it more reliable (and cheaper) to move one of the circuits to be on the same half of your incoming electric power.
 
  #5  
Old 01-01-04, 06:47 PM
B
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Why would it be more reliable? What if you have several rooms where you want to use devices that have this problem and you don't have a choice? What if you can't move the the breakers?
 

Last edited by SafeWatch; 01-01-04 at 10:10 PM.
  #6  
Old 01-04-04, 11:34 AM
R
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Thr problem with a phase coupler is that they require electricity to run. The amount is minimal, but they do require electricity. The reliability comes into play because the components can wear out. They may last "forever", but they may wear out.

Only older homes with fuses or small apartments with small circuit breaker panels would possibly have an issue with swapping breakers around.
 
  #7  
Old 01-04-04, 04:18 PM
B
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I thought that that's what the capacitor in the coupler did so it didn't need electricity to run...I could be wrong though.

But...you are completely wrong about the later statement. The size of the circuit panel has nothing to do with it. If you have several devices scattered in a large home (one that has a sub-panel perhaps) on several different circuits. There may not be enough slack in all the feeds to put them all on the same 110 leg.

I have chosen to sell my FM devices to go a different route due to better options and cost.
 

Last edited by SafeWatch; 01-05-04 at 08:31 AM.
  #8  
Old 01-05-04, 07:18 AM
R
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You are correct about the possibility of subpanels, etc. These do present a problem, but if a phase coupler can solve these problems then so can putting them on the same leg of the circuit.

However, the issue of slack to move breakers around is not correct. You can add wirenuts and wire to extend a hot wire, if necessary, to find a different breaker location within the same box. Although this is not pretty it can be done.

The issue about the number of circuits had to do with the number of actual 110 circuits and load balancing.

I am glad that you solved your problem.
 
 

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