coax cable length & cable modem

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  #1  
Old 05-25-03, 07:36 AM
ostuni
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coax cable length & cable modem

i just added a coax cable drop to my home office in order to connect a cable modem for internet access.

i bought a 100 ft. cable b/c i thought maybe the 50 ft. COULD have come up short...

turns out afer pulling the 100 ft i have way plenty so spare (of course, had i bought the 50 ft it would have come up 1 in. short...)

would there be any peformance difference between the 50 ft vs. the 100 ft cables? iow, is cable length an issue in this application? would anyone recommend doing all the fishing, climbing, attic-sweating, etc. to redo with the 50 ft?

until i learn otherwise will always wonder if the 50 ft coax would have provided better service for data....

mtia
 
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Old 05-25-03, 08:16 AM
S
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You would notice very little difference. Not enough to worry about, IMO. The biggest concern with Cable Modem applications, is to make sure you split the cable modem off from the main line (ie: the cable comes to the house, split it with a 2-way splitter - 1 to house TV's, 1 to Cable Modem.) This provides the best signal to the modem. If you use a 3/4/5/6-way splitter at the modem connection, you greatly reduce the signal. If you need more splits, put them on the line to the house <i>after</i> the 2-way splitter.

Good luck!
 
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Old 05-25-03, 08:18 AM
C
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If you have the means to attach new connectors, you could pull the excess and trim the cable more to length. When the cable company comes to install the modem, be sure the installer knows which run of cable will go to the modem so that he can peak the signal to that run.

Given the high levels of signal available to cable service, I doubt that the difference in length will matter. If the installer is concerned about the length, he could pull the excess and install new connectors. He will have the tools to do this, so it would be simple.

Hope this helps.
 
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Old 05-25-03, 08:30 AM
ostuni
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cheers. and thanks for the tip about where to make the split - that was gonna be the next question!
 
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Old 05-25-03, 09:42 AM
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No problem.

Chris has a good idea about cutting off the slack, just make sure you leave plenty extra. Those ends can be a real pain to put on. You can get screw-on F-connectors, but they are not near as good as the crimp-on. Like Chris said, if you have a tech coming out, let him do it (the Coax strippers and crimpers will run you $30-50.) If you're doing it yourself, you don't really <i>need</i> the strippers, the F-connector packaging should tell you how to strip out the coax (it's not really difficult.)

Good luck!
 
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