Cable TV Reception


  #1  
Old 11-18-03, 06:10 AM
ricciuto
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Cable TV Reception

Cable TV cabling in my house was installed prior to my moving in. It looks like an albatross of cable througout the basement. I have poor reception in bedroom yet at the main tv in living room it is better but not exceptional. The "cable guy" says my signal is fine. How can I determine where the problem lies. Is it splitters, cables, or what?
 
  #2  
Old 11-18-03, 08:13 AM
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Start where it enters the house and track from there. More than three lines running from a single entry line will degrade the signal necessitating an amplifier to boost the signal to acceptable levels.

There are many splitters and amplifiers available on the secondary market. Disconnecting unused lines will help the overall signal strenght, especially if this will lower the total connections to three.

Ideally, all the cable will be RG6. It should all connect with F or appropriate connectors to connecting blocks or terminals for the television receiver. It should not be spliced with tape and such.

The tech may be telling you that the signal is fine at the entry point but not acccounting for all the other lines inside.

Hope this helps. Post back if you need anything more.
 
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Old 11-18-03, 08:20 AM
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It also helps if you terminate unused outlets - you can get some screw-on F-terminators at the Depot. If you find splitters with unused outlets, put terminators there too - in other words, try not to leave any openings to the let the signal out (ok, so it doesn't really get out )

Good luck!
 
  #4  
Old 11-18-03, 09:36 AM
Nucleus
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Originally posted by chfite
More than three lines running from a single entry line will degrade the signal necessitating an amplifier to boost the signal to acceptable levels.
Not true. The signal should be high enough to handle 6 drops, with a single splitter.

Disconnecting unused lines will help the overall signal strenght, especially if this will lower the total connections to three.
Disconnecting other lines will do nothing for you, unless that means removing splitters. Once a splitter is used, you have the stated loss on all ports for that splitter, whether used or not.

The tech may be telling you that the signal is fine at the entry point but not acccounting for all the other lines inside.
Going back to point number 1.
 
  #5  
Old 11-18-03, 09:41 AM
Nucleus
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Re: Cable TV Reception

More than likely you have a run going to the LR with a 2-way splitter. Then from that second line it's going to the other rooms, including the bedroom with poor reception, possibly with more splitters too. Your best bet is to see if there is a central location you could mount a single splitter to feed all rooms.
 

Last edited by SafeWatch; 11-18-03 at 09:57 AM.
  #6  
Old 11-18-03, 11:54 AM
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More than three lines running from a single entry line will degrade the signal necessitating an amplifier to boost the signal to acceptable levels.
Not true. The signal should be high enough to handle 6 drops, with a single splitter.
If you have enough of a signal to tolerate a 7 dB loss per leg for 6 connections. A 7 dB loss would leave you with one-fifth of the original signal. Our cable company requires an amp for more than 3 lines, in order to guarantee sufficient signal. Apparently, it does not want subscribers with that much loss in the lines. Your company may operate differently or provide a stronger signal. Local practices and individual experiences vary.

The tech may be telling you that the signal is fine at the entry point but not acccounting for all the other lines inside.
Going back to point number 1
Depending upon how the house is wired. Quality of cable and equipment can affect overall performance.

albatross of cable througout the basement.
Sounds as if there is a rat's nest of wiring.

Disconnecting the line without removing the splitter does nothing. Absolutely. A point that should have been made instead of assuming that one would otherwise do so.
 
  #7  
Old 11-19-03, 05:13 AM
ricciuto
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Thanks for all your repsonses. Looks like I got to fish out some cables and put terminations in. The guy who lived here before me must have had a surplus of cable and used it like he needed to stash it. Splitters every where. Please answer one more question for me.

Where would a sgnal amplifier be installed and would this help out some of my problem for improved reception?
 
  #8  
Old 11-19-03, 05:36 AM
Nucleus
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You're better off removing all of the splitters and using just one. Also, if you have the tools, cut down the runs so there is only minimal slack left. Most amplifiers that are inexpensive will not give you the results you're looking for. Also, you will probably end up over amplifying the first TV, trying to get a good signal on the last. If you can, I'd run a brand new RG6QS cable from the cable entry point to a splitter and then each run from there. Besides, the less connections the better and you'll be a lot happier with the results. The basic tools and connectors are cheap.

Good Luck.
 
 

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