data / phone wiring


  #1  
Old 12-22-03, 06:36 PM
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Question data / phone wiring

Hello,

I am rewiring my house, and running new phone wires.
I was planning on using regular 4 wire for the phone,
but have been thinking it'd be nice to wire the house for
data too.

Can someone either help me learn how to wire for data
or point me to a website that can show me?

It'd be nice to run just one wire that would do data and
phone, but don't I have to run a wire for each computer
I want in a room?

For example, If I have a server, two desktops and two
laptops, I'd need to run 5 wires, right? And if I potentially
want to use the computers in a different room (for example,
the bedroom I'm using as a study gets filled up with a
new baby and I have to move the study....) I'd have to run
5 wires to each room, right or no?

Thanks for any advice you can offer.
 
  #2  
Old 12-22-03, 07:38 PM
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Yes, to some degree. But it is not much more trouble to run 4 runs of Cat5 than it is to run one run of Cat5. If you are going to pull wire, use Cat5. Skip the phone grade wire because is will be worthless for any other application.

Here is what I did and how I did it.

http://www.ac5r.org/cat5.html

There is one change to the wiring. Since I rewired the alarm system the connection for the telephone is different. See http://www.ac5r.org/Alarm_wiring_final.jpeg

If you use Cat5, you can run phones or data over it, but you cannot run data over 4 wire phone grade cable at speeds that are expected nowadays. If you use only Cat5, you won't need to buy but one kind of cable. A spool of 1000 ft. is not all that expensive.

Here is a web site for a commercial presentation of network wiring.

http://www.siemon.com/us/homecabling/

Despite what you may read, this type of project is well within the means of a DIYer. As with any other project, planning, materials, attention to detail, and patient work are essential to a successful installation.

Plan ahead for the future. I ran two runs to any place that I ran cable. You can never tell what you might want to do later on. It was not much more trouble to run two to every point than to run one. With any luck, you will have to do this only once. Some are pulling Cat5e or Cat6. I don't know how long it will be before there will be any real need for a network faster than 100 Mbps. Your internet connection won't be faster than 1 Mbps unless you have a T-1 line. You won't be moving data over your network faster than 9 Mbps until drives are faster than that. In the same vein, there is no point building a network for 10 Mbps.

Read some of the other posts on this very topic for other views.

Hope this helps.

When I wired my house, I abandoned all the existing telephone wiring in favor of a central system with Cat5.

You should also consider what application you may have for video in the future and consider pulling RG-6 for that. I did not do that with mine. When I remodel the living room, where the entertainment center is in my house, I will pull 4 runs of RG-6 to the hub against any future needs. I will also pull two more runs of Cat5 while I am at it. One never knows.

If your needs change dramatically or temporarily in one location, you can install a hub there to feed more than the number of individual lines back to the router in the home hub.

Hope this helps.
 
  #3  
Old 01-13-04, 11:28 PM
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>I don't know how long it will be before there will be any real need for a network faster than 100 Mbps.

100E will probably stick around for quite some time. 1000E stuff is appearing, but I don't see any immediate need by home user-types (but then 640KB was an inconceivably huge amount of memory when the IBM PC came out in 84.)

>Your internet connection won't be faster than 1 Mbps unless you have a T-1 line.

my current adsl line tops out at about 1.3Mbps, people on cable supposedly get around 6Mbps best case.

people running wireless top out at about 5.5Mbps running 11b and about 35Mbps running 11g. The 11Mbps and 54Mbps numbers is raw bitrate, but not realistic datarate.

> You won't be moving data over your network faster than 9 Mbps until drives are faster than that. In the same vein, there is no point building a network for 10 Mbps

true again. but actually, if you have 2 computers and move big files between them, you can saturate a 100E link. Realistically speaking, one can squeeze about 70-80Mbps down a 100Mbps link once ethernet overhead is accounted. Hard disks are easily good for 133Mbps these days. Moving 700MB+ files between computers is painful with a 10BT connection. Much better with 100E, but how often one does that is questionable...

100E isn't much more expensive than 10BT these days.

You can actually get by with 1 cat5 in each room if you're tech-savy. Get an IP phone and stick it into a hub or switch that ties together all your other stuff :-)
 
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Old 01-14-04, 10:00 AM
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Terminology has gotten the best of us here. I want to get the terminology straight in my mind. 8 bits to a byte. ADSL runs at 1.5 Megabits per second, which is ~187 KiloBytes per second. A 100 Megabit per second network would top out at 12.5 megabytes per second (12,500 kilobytes per second). So a 100 Megabit network is 66 times faster than the 1.5 Megabit ADSL line feeding it. Ultra ATA 133 Drives have rated external data transfer rate of 133 MBytes per second. This is moving data from the drive to the computer's RAM. I moved a 800 MegaByte file across my network at a sustained rate of 780 KiloBytes per second by dragging and dropping the file. When I transferred a 730 MB file via FTP from my server across the same network, it averaged 5.6 MB per second. It seems that moving a file by drag and drop is not so efficient as FTP.

If both drives were ATA 100 drives capable of 100 MegaByte per second transfers on a 100 Megabit network, the top speed would be 100 Megabits or about 12.5 MegaBytes per second. It appears from my little test that the external transfer rate of the drives is much greater than the rate at which data can move from a drive across a network to another drive.

So when all the pieces come together, the total process is not so fast as the indivdual pieces.
 
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Old 01-15-04, 12:42 PM
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Just because you have multiple computers in a single room does not mean that you need to run one cable per computer.

You can quite easily install an inexpensive switch in your computer room and run all the computers in that room off the switch. You then connect the switch using a single cable to the main router/switch in your basement or wherever).

This has the advantage of keeping the signal local, rather than sending it down to the main switch/router where your internet connection is located, and where all the cable runs connect.
 
 

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