new house wiring


  #1  
Old 08-04-04, 08:54 AM
Frodo33
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new house wiring

Ok, I'm soon going to be building a new house. I would like to run cat5 throughout the house. I also would like to do this myself (if possible). I do
have some basic computer knowledge and feel somewhat confident in taking
on this task.

A few questions that I have are:

1. From what I have read, The "star" or "home run" style of set up is the way to
go. So, what I need more info on is the central block. How exactly is this set up
and what do I need? maybe more importantly, what is it?

2. My main reason behind doing this is for sharing a broadband connection and networking/sharing files. What else will I be able to do with this?

3. What kind of cost am I looking at? and is cat5 the right wire for me?


Thanks
Frodo
 
  #2  
Old 08-04-04, 10:04 AM
R
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Cat 5e is what you need. You want to run at least two cables to every location, possibly three or four.

Some people will tell you to run this cable with cat 3 for telephones. I disagree. Use all cat 5. Cat 5 can be used for phones and allows the most flexibility.

Also run at least 2 runs of RG6 to each room. In large rooms or where rearrangement of furniture setup is likely, make multiple runs to different places in the room.

Your central location is nothing more than a large patch panel. Make sure that it can accomodate all your connections, and that you have power there. This will probably be where you place the broadband routera dn where you have the telephone service come in to.
 
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Old 08-04-04, 10:14 AM
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why three or four to each location ?

two should be more than adequate one for data one for voice

if you need more data a switch at that location covers that

one 4 pair voice line will support 4 pots phones or two "system sets"

more than two to each location is overkill and becomes un-necessarly complex

if you really want to cover yourself for future needs run conduit from each location back to the mdf

blue "smurf" tube works well for this type of application

then if you need something further in the furure it can be easily pulled
 
  #4  
Old 08-05-04, 05:34 AM
R
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It's much cheaper (and the network is faster, depending on where the majority of the traffic goes) if you have one switch instead of multiple switches in the network. It also wastes electricity and looks bad to have switches everywhere.

As for the phone lines, it real easy to plug a normal telephone into an RJ45 jack. Use two RJ45 jacks and no need for a splitter or anything else to complicate the picture.

I personally believe in spending time and money now to save time and money in the future.
 
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Old 08-05-04, 05:43 AM
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It's much cheaper (and the network is faster, depending on where the majority of the traffic goes) if you have one switch instead of multiple switches in the network. It also wastes electricity and looks bad to have switches everywhere.


keep in mind we are talking a home here not a office with 75 workstations

5 port switch (if needed ) is less than 30.00 electric draw typically less than a amp

I doubt you could mesure the latencey a second switch would introduce in this application

you ought to be using rj ll for phones not 45

no need for splitter use a modular jack system and if another jack is needed pop it off wire up another module

I personally believe in spending time and money now to save time and money in the future.

I agree but no sense Wasting time , money or resources either
 
  #6  
Old 08-05-04, 08:46 AM
Frodo33
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well racraft and mango man thank you very much for you thoughts and opinoins.
Sorry for starting the spat. lol

what exactly is the difference between rj II and rj45?


Frodo33
 
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Old 08-05-04, 08:54 AM
Frodo33
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do either of you know any good reading material related to this subject?

book, website, magazine, others?

thanks again
Frodo33
 
  #8  
Old 08-05-04, 11:17 AM
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Frodo, Faced the same questions you did about a year ago. Rather than redo all of my questions and answers the other provided, I will direct you to view them in the Home Automation forum. My first post was dated 11/14/03 and then I had a follow-up one on 2/17/04. I posted in the Home Automation site because this Voice & Data site did not exist at that time.

My experience turned out very good. In the house now, all of my connections work (at least the ones I have hooked up). A few of my RJ45's at the Central location did not work the first time, but I simply cut the bad one off & redid with a new one. RJ45's are cheap.

Short list of recommendations. Use a supply house they are the cheapest for cable. Use Leviton for the wall plates & modular plugs because they are good quality & easy to get anywhere. Use Cat 6 cable, it only costs a little more than Cat 5e (for me is was around 2 penny's more per foot, might I have added $30 - 40 total). If you are looking to save $$, do not buy the bundled cables, simply buy seperate cable reels, build a simple stand using broom sticks, tape the end of the 3 - 4 seperate cables and pull them all together. Work from the top of the house down, letting gravity work in your favor. Go ahead & buy a couple good cable cutters & connection pliers / tools, they really make doing the connections easier.

Good Luck. I will check back periodically to see if you have any more questions.
 
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Old 08-05-04, 07:39 PM
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I dont see it as a spat sorry if it came acrross that way

I see it as discussion which seems to not go on on this board on another cabling forum where I post this type of discussion might go on for a couple of pages with good points made all around.

rj 45 is a 8 pin jack for 4 pair cable its used for data connections the old Lucent merlin phone system used it for voice

rj 11 is 2 pair 4 conductor jack used for voice

the problem with using rj 45 for voice is your telephone line cord dosnt fit snugly in the jack and can get pulled sideways causing your phone to lose connection or short out the line.

rj 45 is being used for voice more and more but i dont feel its correct and I dont do it.

(rj 11 jacks are less expensive and you gain nothing by usnig the 45 which are roughly twice the price.

I wouldnt use cat 6 I would stay with 5E

this is the book Iwould recommend

http://www.bicsi.org/Content/Index.a...le=respubs.htm
 
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Old 08-06-04, 07:02 AM
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I also do not take offense at comments, as long as they are not rude or deragatory, which they are not, in this case.

I work in the computer software business.

At my former company all the cubes were wired with four runs of cat 5. This provided ultimate flexibility. Each person had one phone and one network connection. Some needed a modem, other needed another network connection, or even two other network connections. Our design allowed this flexibility.

At my present company, each cube has two phone lines (cat 3) and two network jacks (cat 5). Nobody needs two phone jacks, but some people do need three network jacks. This has led to cables run to nearby cubes, or the use of hubs.

Now I realize that homes are not businesses (at least not most of them), and that this kind of flexibility is overkill for most people.

However, in my own home I would want this same flexibility for the same reasons.
 
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Old 08-06-04, 09:54 AM
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Im glad you didnt take offense Bob it seems this forum is for the most part one answer then thats it.

I Thought of this thread yesterday I got a emergency call from a customer 60 miles away late yesterday he was reconfiguring some offices and needed to add a fax and modem to one

I was sure glad we had the extra pairs in the wall when I got there

In business applications I try to design for at least twice the inital request

the plans call for one phone and data i usually pull for at least two phones and two data.

in a business application the extra cable is not a problem since it is all terminating in a communications closet

in a residental application having a dozen or so extra cables to deal with can pose a real space problem.

I think opposing points of veiw can lead to a learning experiance
 
  #12  
Old 08-09-04, 11:34 AM
DPMeans
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We are also in the process of wiring a new house, learning from others experience.

Am I understanding you to say that you pulled four runs of 4-pair cable? Or that you had 4 pairs available at each location?

Originally Posted by racraft
were wired with four runs of cat 5.
 
 

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