Help Wiring Ethernet Cable in an Office (patch panel?)


  #1  
Old 09-21-04, 11:15 PM
pinoy4065
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Help Wiring Ethernet Cable in an Office (patch panel?)

Task: Install 7 Ethernet Jacks into different rooms.

Completed: Installed 5 Jacks

Problem:
So basically i need to install 2 more jacks and i did all the work in the attic and i dropped all the wires through the walls but in this last case when i was dropping the wire i hit a cross bar. So basically i was wondering if i really have any options in getting around it. Or even advice in what to do to avoid the situation next time. But basically is my only option to cut the wall where the crossbar is and cut a chunk out of it so the wire can get through?

Question:
I also wanted to know what is the significance of using a patch panel i was never really sure how or why they are used. if someone can explain that would be great.

Question:
Also the DSL modem and router are in a room its not in the attic but its the room that goes to the attic and i was wondering since its not the coolest place but not too hot either i wanted to know what kind of issues can be caused the from mild heat.

I appreciate all the help in advance...THANKS!
-Andrew
 
  #2  
Old 09-22-04, 11:49 AM
C
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You can use a bellhanger's bit to drill through the stop block. You can get a bellhanger's bit at lowes.

http://www.lashen.com/vendors/BES/Fish_Bits.asp

Question:
I also wanted to know what is the significance of using a patch panel i was never really sure how or why they are used. if someone can explain that would be great.

To provide flexibility in making various connections as well as avoiding using the terminal ends of the actual wire in the run for connections which tend to flex the wires and cause failure in the wires and connectors. With patch cords, this most likely point of failure can be easily replaced when the cord or connector fails.

If the room is not too hot for a person to stay, it won't be too hot for the equipment. Check the label on the equipment for temperature ranges.

Hope this helps.
 
  #3  
Old 09-22-04, 01:31 PM
pinoy4065
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Smile

Thanks Chris i apprecaite the reply but i'm not to sure how the bellhanger's bit is used? How do i use the bit to drill a hole into the cross bar? The bar is about 6 feet of the ground or in the middle of the wall? so basically i'm not to sure how this is to be used.

And regarding the patch panel i dont mean to make things complicating. But what kind of examples are there in providing flexibility in making various connections. And when you said it also avoids using the terminal ends of the wire, are just speaking of the very ends of each wire? And where does it tend to flex and fail?, which makes it easier to replace?

And in regards to the equipment ok sounds good it is decent for a person and yah i'll check out the temp requirements on the items themselves, i didnt think of that thanks!

And again thanks
-Andrew
 
  #4  
Old 09-22-04, 07:31 PM
M
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RE patch panels

One of the main uses for patch panels is network flexibility. Say you run two Cat5 cables to each box in the office/house, one for phone one for data, with a total of 20 boxes, you now have to manage 40 cables at the other end. Run each one of the to the back of a patch panel. Now instead of having to reconfigure the cables as your needs change, I need two network jacks at a specific location, you just unplug the patch cable that runs from the main patch panel to the phone patch panel (or punch down block) and plug it into the router/switch.

Say for instance that you commit one line to phone and one to data. You put connectors on you data and connect them to the switch. With the phone, drop those into a punch down block. Now you in a position that every time you need to move a phone connection to a data connection you have to trim the wire and possible put a connector on it, after a while you're going to end up with different length cables (making the instalation messy), and possibly cable that don't reach the termination device.

Another way you can think of it is like the old telephone operators (the human kind) X lines in Y lines out and the patch panel gives them a means to make the connections with the greatest flexability.

Hope this helps some.
 
  #5  
Old 09-23-04, 08:01 PM
C
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A bellhanger's bit is long so as to drill through the obstruction and has holes in either end to pull a fishing line through to pull wire.

Take a look here:
http://k4tet.us/whole_panel2.jpg

You can see the cables from the network coming in from the top and bottom, bundled, to be punched down into the block. From this block, patch cable run to the telephone connection and to the router. These patch cables are the ones that will fail due to being moved from time to time. Movement will loosen the crimped connections. The connectors cannot be crimped again, they must be replaced.

My entire cat5 wiring project is here:

http://k4tet.us/cat5

Hope this helps.
 
  #6  
Old 09-24-04, 03:16 PM
pinoy4065
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Thumbs up

ahhh ok for the most part i understand now the use or reason of use of a patch panel as well as how the bellhanger's bit works. I appreciate all the help and responses!!!
 
 

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