Telephone Junction Box


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Old 10-26-04, 10:08 PM
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Question Telephone Junction Box

Is there a such thing as a simple phone wire junction box? Just a box you attach multiple phone wires to in order to split the signals to say....6 wires.

I dont need anything overkill, but I'm looking for this product that seems simple enough but is apparently hard to find. I found nothing at Home Depot. There is something like what I'm looking for in my home, very old, at the service entrance. It's a black plastic box with 4 terminals, 3 wires attached to each. I'm looking for basically the same thing, maybe with higher capacity, but new. Anybody?
 
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Old 10-27-04, 09:07 AM
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A couple of questions for you.

Is it one phone line/phone number that you want to tie six phones into?
Are the individual wires in the phone lines solid copper?
Are the phone lines bare wire with out plugs?

If you answered yes to all the questions then the simple thing to do would be to use a punch down block to connect them all (< $10, available at a home store).
 
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Old 10-27-04, 09:26 AM
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Service coming into the house is only 4-wire red-green-black-yellow, only the first line is in use (and will be for the foreseeable future) The basement is a jumble of phone wires now run every which way under the joists diagonally, going from the main "junction box" (the big black thing) to 2 smaller "junction boxes" (regular screw terminal phone jacks) I'm planning to replace the main one at the edge of the basement with a decent new one mid-basement with a star pattern out, including the 2 to the "phone jack junctions" and 2 new lines, and maybe replacing one or two wires going to the phone jacks with runs straight to the new J.B. The wires are solid copper. red and green are all thats used now.

I'm considering a 66-block, dont own a punchdown tool though (unless my dad has one somewhere) and Im not entirely sure how to wire one either.
 
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Old 10-27-04, 01:04 PM
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Punch down tools can be found inexpensive. There are a number of ways to wire a punchdown... basically it is any way you want. Here's what I'd recommend:
Wire each line that terminates at a wall outlet to the side of the PDB. eg. if you're using cat 3 cable, pin 1 = red, pin 2 = green, 3 = yellow, 4 = black, and repeat until all your lines are attached. Next if you still have connectors on the outside of the block open punch down the phone service from outside. next, pull apart a 2 foot piece of cable leaving you the 4 individual connectors. on the side with the phone service tie all the red together by punching down on the inner terminal of that side. Do the same for the other colors. So now all the jacks attached to the one side are capable of dual line service. Next, using jumpers you should be able to connect the inner most terminals together such that the colors on each side match up, this is the neat way, or you can just continue running the singe cundctor to all the posts on the other side.

Let's see if I can do this in ascii...

<PRE>
r-x <J> +-------x-r - Jack 1
g-x <J> | +-----x-g - Jack 1
y-x <J> | | +---x-y - Jack 1
b-x <J> | | | +-x-b - Jack 1
r-x <J> +-|-|-|-x-r - Phone service
g-x <J> +-|-|-x-g - Phone service
y-x <J> +-|-x-y - Phone service
b-x <J> +-x-b - Phone service
</PRE>

r,g,y,b,x are all terminals.
The x closest to the corresponding color is the adjacent open terminal.
Lines are drawn to show wires connecting the internal terminals
<J> represents a jumper connecting the interal terminal of one side to the internal terminal on the other side.

A couple of links that might help
Low Voltage Home Pre-Wire Guide Scroll down to the telephone hub section.
Punch Down Close-up
Block Wired
An alternative using a special PDB
 
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Old 10-27-04, 09:09 PM
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Merlin,
I think that was the first understandable walkthrough of installing wires on a 66 block I've ever read! At least I know now exactly how all the wires can be connected. So technically, if I dont have a whole lot of wires to connect (and currently I dont) I could wire one side and chain it all together, then use the jumpers to connect it to the other side for easy future expansion, correct? Thanks for the detailed post.
 
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Old 10-27-04, 09:59 PM
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Yup. Flexibility without having to rewire a lot of connections.
 
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Old 10-28-04, 06:51 PM
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You'd be much better off using the 110 punch block - there's no jumpering anything, everything is already jumpered.

If you want to expand later on, you can add another 110 punch easily.

Good luck!
 
 

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