CAT5E color coding chart?

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Old 08-17-05, 03:32 PM
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CAT5E color coding chart?

Do any of you have a handy, downloadable, chart that shows the color coding for CAT5E, for patch A and for patch B, by any chance? Thanks.
 
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Old 08-17-05, 04:21 PM
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Try this site. The diagrams are pretty clear and concise.
 
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Old 08-17-05, 07:09 PM
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Heres my ol' favorite

http://www.swhowto.com/CAT5_Ch1.htm
 
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Old 08-17-05, 07:18 PM
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it should be marked on the jack , it varies by manufacturer

didnt see you where asking about patch cords , not jacks and panels

for what its worth its "bad practice" to make your own cords except for dire emergencys , your far better served in the long run using factory made cords .

(unlless you particularly like troubleshooting that is )
 
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Old 08-17-05, 07:28 PM
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Thanks guys, exactly what we were looking for.

Mango; we're in Colombia. We make EVERYTHING!!
 
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Old 08-18-05, 05:59 AM
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Originally Posted by MAC702
Thanks guys, exactly what we were looking for.

Mango; we're in Colombia. We make EVERYTHING!!
hmm...cat5e cable spun from jungle vines ?

plugs handcrafted from hardwood ?

crimp tool made from bone ?

Routers , congred up by the local shaman ?


the fact that your "in colombia" dosn't change the fact that site built cables also called "scrap crap " amoung most pros (becouse there usually made of scrap cable from the data drops ) are a constant course of problems .

your obviosly ordering your other materials in , do yourself a favor and order in a case of premade patch cords
 
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Old 08-20-05, 07:11 PM
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You guys are talking strictly patch cables right?

I do network and voice cabling for a living and 99% of our cables are custom made (with the exception of patch cords and possibly fiber optic depending on the situation, I actually have fun terminating that stuff)

we just rewired a large building and did about 900 voice drops and alot of them were about 1000' or more.

Im off on a tangent, you have to be talking about patch cords.
 
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Old 08-22-05, 08:47 PM
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FWIW, my local computer store pretty well stopped carrying pre-made ethernet cables, and will make to order whatever you need.
 
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Old 08-23-05, 05:30 AM
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Originally Posted by classicsat
FWIW, my local computer store pretty well stopped carrying pre-made ethernet cables, and will make to order whatever you need.

if they are making them with stranded cable and a bench mounted quaility crimp tool then thats just fine.

solid cable , and a $49 hand tool and they will start seeing a lot of returns
lots of peaple make them , when I took cisco classes we where required to make them . had a conversation with the instructor who was the head of IT at the local community college

he "patch cables are always going out , its the first thing you should check "

me "do you make them or use premade "

he "we make them of course "

me" we always use premade and never see a problem unless the cable has been damaged"
 
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Old 08-26-05, 08:50 AM
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This site has a good explanation of how to make a cat5 cable as well as the color charts you requested.

http://www.cyberxlink.com/cat5.php
 
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Old 09-02-06, 10:30 PM
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Smile

The last time I did the math, you could buy pre-made cables in bulk from a distributor for a lot less than you could hire a guy to make them even if you were paying them minimum wage. I can't imagine someone being in the computer business and making their own, unless they couldn't afford to stock some inventory.

I suppose if you like doing it. My 2 cents would be that it's less reliable, and for any type of business, more expensive.

What was that show where Granny used to make soap out by the swimming pool?
 
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Old 09-03-06, 07:09 AM
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They are a rather small store.
 
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Old 09-03-06, 07:30 AM
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A factory made patch cable is also made from a more flexible cord that is designed to handle the movement required from it. Typical cat5 is not designed to be flexed and moved constantly.

As well, the premade cords are more aesthetically pleasing. cat5 looks like...........well, it looks like cat5 cable. Patch cords are more presentable.
 
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Old 09-03-06, 08:50 AM
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different types of wire

I suspect that the store is using the correct type of cable, or they'd be having all sorts of return problems.

CAT5 or CAT5e is actually the spec for the system - the cable, patch cables, ends, etc, not just the wire, although I'll admit I've told people to "buy some cat5 cable". The cable that goes in the walls of your house, that is sold at home supply places, is solid cable. The cable that's used to make patch cables is stranded cable. You can't put the stranded cable in the walls, because it doesn't meet electrical code specs, and you absolutely shouldn't use solid cable for patch cables, because it isn't meant to be flexed, and the RJ45 connectors for it are terrible.

There are at least 3 general types of RJ45 modular connectors. They can be for stranded flat wire, stranded round wire, and solid round wire. The connectors for stranded wire have a single blade for each wire, that cuts through the insulation and makes the connection. It's a good connection, and it's the system that has been used for the silver phone cables for years. The connectors for solid wire have a blade split in thirds. As you crimp the ones for solid, the blade hits the top of the wire and goes through the insulation, the middle section goes one way around the copper wire, the outside section goes the other way. Friction holds the sides of the blades to the single solid wire. It's a lousy connection, any way you look at it.

If you use connectors designed for stranded wire for solid wire, the connection is even worse! Anybody doing that should have a cold bucket of water poured on their head. Using the right connectors is bad enough, when you use the ones for stranded cable, the blade, as it's being crimped, hits the top of the insulation, and then the top of the copper wire. It can't go through that solid wire, so it slides to one side or the other, and is then makes connection by just being beside the wire.

Even with the "correct" connector, patch cables made with solid wire are very unreliable. Not only is their no strain relief, as there would be with a pre-made cable, but the solid wire, being solid, transmits much, much more "torque" (I know, it's "moment"), to the connector than stranded wire when the cable is moved around. On top of all that, the electrical connection itself, between the metal of the connector and the wire is nowhere near as good with solid as it is stranded. The crimp process of the connection holds/pins the blade into the stranded wire in that connector. With solid, a connector can't be made to hold the wire as a crimp. The connection is instead made from the side of the wire rubbing against the side of connector blade, held in place by the sideways force of the blade acting as a little spring, and possible a little pressure from the sideways compression of the insulation.

The connectors for flat/stranded cable used to be common (at least in this area) for business phone systems, but now everyone seems to be using round wire for that, as well. Flat cable works fine for phones, but not Ethernet. CAT5 round cable won't fit into a flat connector, so you don't have to worry about using that connector by accident. The blade system is the same for it as it is the round/stranded type. The entry point for the cable is just smaller and flat, to secure the wire. Flat cable will work with round/stranded ends, but the cable itself isn't held in the connector by the crimp, so will pull out easily.
 
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Old 09-03-06, 02:28 PM
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Albany Tom: much of your post makes a lot of sense but there a a few things I was hoping you could explain a bit.

"You can't put the stranded cable in the walls, because it doesn't meet electrical code specs,"

Really has me intrigued. What code spec are you reffering to and why wouldn't stranded cable be allowed in a wall?

and when you speak of flat cable. Pardon my ignorance but I have never seen a cat5 rated flat cable.

At least with cat6 cable, part of the engineering of the cable is dependant upon the rolling twist of the entire group of conductors as well as the individual unique twist rates of each pair. I would have to actually look at some 5 to see if the twist is intentional or merely a product of manufacturing. If there is a designed twist of the entire 4 pair, it would not be able to be maintained in a flat cable.
 
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Old 09-03-06, 04:15 PM
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The codes are mostly about specs related to its resistance to carry fire.
 
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Old 09-03-06, 04:31 PM
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That part I understand and am aware of, I just don't understand what stranded wire has to do with it.
 
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Old 09-03-06, 07:47 PM
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with stranded cable you lose the 100 meter distance , Its less than 100meters I have seen the figures but I dont recall what it drops it to

there is flat cat 5e cable , I have some samples around somwhere pricey as I recall .

I dont beilve stranded iin the wall poses any risk , or violates any code .

in the trade patch cords made with solid cat5 cable are called "scrap crap " since they are often made from scrap and there longterm reialblity is crap
 
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Old 09-03-06, 08:27 PM
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"mango man
there is flat cat 5e cable , I have some samples around somwhere pricey as I recall . "

Have you ever tested for certification a system using flat cable? Does it test out within standards?

Putting the numbers on something doesn't mean it will actually perform as required by those numbers.
 
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Old 09-03-06, 11:44 PM
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Originally Posted by nap
That part I understand and am aware of, I just don't understand what stranded wire has to do with it.
It doesn't have anything to do with the stranding part, it's the rating of the cable. Because CAT5 solid cable is designed to go into a building, pretty much nobody makes CAT5 solid cable without a UL CM, CMR or CMP rating, as required by NEC. (I believe that changed from CL2/CL2R/CL2P around 1999/2002.) CAT5 stranded wire may carry a CM rating, but usually the generic stuff sold at computer fares doesn't.

As to the flat cable part, I was referring to the 'silver satin' type of non-twisted voice cable that key phone systems commonly used to use. Has nothing to do with the cat5 discussion, unless someone were to go one step below crimped ends on solid cable, and try to use silver satin for Ethernet.

The 'flat CAT5e' I remember seeing was a Belden product. I suppose it might not meet the specs, but that would be unusual for them. I've heard of problems with CAT6, but not many with 5e.
 
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Old 09-04-06, 05:51 AM
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i got it at a major trade show , from a known cable vendor , never used it but im sure it would test it fine

do a google search flat cat5e lots of hits , heres one

http://www.vpi.us/cable-sf-shld.html

I suspect the reason you dont see more is as I said its pricy and the market just isnt there
 
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Old 09-04-06, 07:22 AM
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Thanks guys. I continue to learn.

Mango, did you notice the link you posted was 28awg wire and contained a drain wire. I wonder if the drain offers some substitute for the rolling twist of round cable.

Anyway, I've hijacked this thread enough. I'm outta here.
I'll start a new one when more q's come to mind.
 
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Old 09-04-06, 05:35 PM
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Smile

These days I try to learn, but I think I'm losing more than is going in...

For what it's worth, it's been my experience that if you use name brand parts, and do a decent install, cat5e always works for 100baseT. The normal things that make it not work are the obvious - broken wire, crossed pair, bad punch. At the same time, it's been the experience where I work that even with the best parts, and a good install, gigabit Ethernet can be unreliable. For gig runs, we only use fiber, even if there's cat6 in place.

Of course I tend to be conservative about things like that, too.
 
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