DSL Modem


  #1  
Old 09-14-06, 06:59 AM
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DSL Modem

I have DSL in my home using a speedstream 5100 modem. I have a computer in my office/shed 200 feet behind the house, anytime i want internet connection i unplug the modem and plug into my office, works great just the hassle of unplugging and replugging. Can i buy another DSL modem and install in the office and run this way as long as i don't have both modems turned on at the same time. Someone said the phone company would charge me for an additional account.

Thanks
 
  #2  
Old 09-14-06, 04:06 PM
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You could likely do that. DSL is billed per line. Cable intenret is where they may have to bill you per modem.
 
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Old 09-14-06, 06:11 PM
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Only one DSL modem will be able to authenticate at a time.
 
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Old 09-15-06, 07:15 AM
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Hey guys thanks. I borrowed a modem last night and it worked great. Just need to make sure i don't have both modems on at the same time.
 
  #5  
Old 09-15-06, 08:23 AM
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Just make sure that the modem you buy is allowed by your provider. Some providers do not allow third party DSL modems.
 
  #6  
Old 09-17-06, 09:30 AM
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IMO, they can't "allow" or "disallow" modems. As long as thery are certified for connection to the phone network, and are of the same type the provider uses, you should be okay.

Another option is to go wireless to the shed, with one modem in the house with a wireless router, although getting it to work 200 ft might be a bit of work.
 
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Old 10-16-06, 10:15 PM
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Originally Posted by classicsat
IMO, they can't "allow" or "disallow" modems. As long as thery are certified for connection to the phone network, and are of the same type the provider uses, you should be okay.
It really depends on the carrier's setup. Oftentimes, broadband providers have you give the MAC address from the router and their system will only give an IP address to known MAC addresses. Don't assume that because it works for now that it will always work, as broadband providers seem to constantly be locking down their systems.


Originally Posted by classicsat
Another option is to go wireless to the shed, with one modem in the house with a wireless router, although getting it to work 200 ft might be a bit of work.
This would be the best way to go. Get 802.11G (Wireless G), since it has a much better range than 802.11B. Granted, you may not get the full theoretical 54Mbps, but then again if your broadband connection is 1.5-6Mbps, it shouldn't affect Internet connection speeds any. Just make sure you try to get the two wireless devices as clean of a path as possible (few walls or other obstructions, especially metal). You might have to invest in a higher quality antenna than what comes with your devices and play around with what works best.
 
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Old 10-29-06, 04:26 PM
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Originally Posted by glandix
You might have to invest in a higher quality antenna than what comes with your devices and play around with what works best.
That, or look into a 3rd party firmware, such as DD-WRT. You can increase the power output on the router and achieve connection at distances never possible before.

I think the Linksys WRT54g has a default power output of 28mW. Using DD-WRT, I have mine pushing 125mW and connection of wireless clients inside and out the house is excellent.
 
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Old 10-29-06, 06:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Heterman
That, or look into a 3rd party firmware, such as DD-WRT. You can increase the power output on the router and achieve connection at distances never possible before.

I think the Linksys WRT54g has a default power output of 28mW. Using DD-WRT, I have mine pushing 125mW and connection of wireless clients inside and out the house is excellent.
most definitely! i don't know what i'd do without my dd-wrt firmware on both my LinkSys router and Motorola router
 
 

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