FiOS and RG6?

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  #1  
Old 08-11-07, 04:02 PM
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FiOS and RG6?

I'm currenly completing wiring a number of rooms in my house with RG6 for cable TV. Before I close up the walls and ceilings in my basement finishing, I want to make sure I have planned appropriately for future upgrades. One such upgrade could be FiOS, which is not currently available in my area. But, since I live in a major suburb of New York City, I suspect that it will be here sonner or later.

Anyway, I called Verizon today just to get an idea of how FiOS works. The sales representative said that a fiber optic cable could be connected to my coax cable before it enters my house, and that I would not have to re-wire inside the house with fiber optic cable to experience the faster speeds FiOS offers.

My question is: If all the interior wire will still be RG6, why would anyone want to upgrade to FiOS? Wouldn't the RG6 slow the transmission speed down to the same speed as I currently get from my cable provider?

Any clarifiactions would be appreciated.
 
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Old 08-11-07, 05:53 PM
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What FIOS does is basically eliminate the outside cable plant, bringing the fibre node to your home. That brings a bit more bandwidth, and a stabler signal than traditional cable, for the TV service they offer.

The "speed" comes from the internet you get with FIOS.

Your internet connection from FIOS comes directly from the ONT (the box that attaches to the side of your house which the fiber terminates) over ethernet. That said, you should provide Cat5e or Cat6 wiring to distribute the internet in your home, and a means to run Cat5e to the ONT, and a cable from the ONT to a power supply unit which the FIOS installer will install inside your home, close to the ONT and a power receptical.
 
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Old 08-11-07, 06:12 PM
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Originally Posted by classicsat View Post
That said, you should provide Cat5e or Cat6 wiring to distribute the internet in your home, and a means to run Cat5e to the ONT, and a cable from the ONT to a power supply unit which the FIOS installer will install inside your home, close to the ONT and a power receptical.
I have Cat5e running to most rooms in the house. Regarding the Cat5e the ONT, where does the other end go?
 
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Old 08-12-07, 05:13 AM
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Fios splits out the signals from fiber to RG6 (if you want) and an ethernet router. The video bandwidth that will be distributed within your home on the RG6 is higher than cable -- roughly 900MHz versus 550MHz -- but it won't obsolete your new wiring. If you have problems (and you probably won't), the worst-case is you'll have to replace the hex connectors with round compression-style connectors.

Almost all of FiOS' video bandwidth is dedicated to digital channels, whereas cable has to continue to dedicate a very large portion of its bandwidth to analog.

On the ethernet side, Cat5e and the router won't be obsolete anytime soon.
 
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Old 08-12-07, 06:10 AM
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[QUOTE=Rick Johnston;1216106]Fios splits out the signals from fiber to RG6 (if you want) and an ethernet router. QUOTE]

Thanks. So, if I understand correctly: If I were to plan ahead, I'd run a Cat5e wire from my ethernet to a place where the ONT will likely enter my house. Is that right? If so, any suggestions on how terminate the run? Would you run the wire to a place where the FiOS will probably enter and put an LV box there on the interior wall with a blank face plate and with the wire on the other side?

Or, an access panel in the basement where the cable (and probably the FiOS will emerge?
 
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Old 08-12-07, 09:25 PM
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The FIOS installer will run the needed Cat5 and RG6 cable from the ONT to your network "homerun" box.

I'd just run a conduit from the network panel to where the ONT will be installed.
 
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Old 08-12-07, 10:31 PM
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Smile fios and RG-6

Acually, your router has a built-in switch with four 100 MHz local ports which can be expanded with another switch to as many ports as you need--probably one per room.

What the salesman told you was wrong, Fios Ethernet is limited to about 6 MHz while CAT5e and your PCs will network at about 100 Mhz. There is no need to go to fiber inside your house to fully utilize your Fios internet. The copper side will actually give you the fastest possible resource sharing between your PCs for file and printer sharing and be far faster (about 15x) than the Fios Etherent service.

I've just re-wired my entire house with EIA-5e and added WiFi, and love it!

The RG-6 is for your TV, of course and you may want to run a double RG-6 for future satelite or TV service. But, there is no need for the future to run single mode fiber around your house, it's just too expensive right now and EIA-5e UTP will serve you well at speeds up to 100 Mhz at a fairly low cost fir the forseeable future.

I like your idea of your using conduit for the low voltage service wiring for Ethernet and TV. The RG-6 is double shielded and can't cause interference and the UTP EIA-5e or 6 is twisted-pair and is inherently low EMI senstivity until you get to the outlet boxes, but the cables will have space isolation there.

My question to that salesman is what was he smoking and why isn't he sharing?

Now, when you are ready for the wireless WiFi side, remember to forget about WEP encryption and go straight to WSA shared key with it's longer encryption key and rate-of-chage. you amy want to hardwire 5e ethernet to all of your fixed PCs around your home and use WiFi wireless for your notebook, PDA, or an IPhone.

To protect your WiFi side from attack, you could stick with just a MAC address table for protection but a MAC address (the ethernet card burned in ethernet address) is too easy to clone and hack into your wireless access point--stick with WSA shared key encryption. Your router manual will get you started (remember RTFM!)? Your notebook manual should cover shared key setup. The rule of thumb with WiFi is to avoid WEP encryption because the short and repeated key is too easy to hack-- you need something far more powerful.

Questions?

God bless,
Tmblweed
 
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Old 08-13-07, 09:38 AM
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Actually, you should use ALL security features of your wireless setup, including turning it off if you don't need wireless.

Turn off broadcasting of the router name.

Turn on MAC address filtering.

Use the highest security that the router and the computers will support out of WPA2, WPA, and WEP.

Change the default sub net that your intranet uses.

Make sure that the hardware firewall is turned on and that you use a software firewall on each machine.

Use static IP addresses unless you absolutely have to use dynamic ones.
 
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Old 11-14-09, 03:46 PM
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Lightbulb chime in and debunk fios balderdash

@mods: yes, this thread is a little old but it keeps showing in websearch results so I felt compelled to chime-in.

******************************
FIOS can- and should be provisioned ENITRELY over ethernet from the ONT to the house. The TV/guide/vod/widgets can be bridged from your ethernet setup to RG6 for the STB using one of their oh so enjoyable MoCA gateways.

There is no magic pixie dust in the fios ethernet/moca KLUDGE device. Your STBs require the last IPA octet to be in the range 100-150. Their device accomplishes this with DHCP options (vendor id & device id). "There can be only one" is false in this case. The on-the-fly increase bandwidth provisioning for VOD similarly does NOT require their KLUDGE device. Any well designed gizmo that will allow RG6/ethernet connection will work nicely.

Among other obvious benefits ethernet empowers you to use mature devices and technologies not the least of which are roll your own pvr (instead of their drm proprietary dvr -- drm is unamerican and evil), or media center / media streaming / HTPC [xbmc, tversity, mythtv, mediaportal, plex.. Networked Media Tank (popcorn hour), mvix]. Now anyone can build a multiple M-card system. mwahaha.

I am living proof of this REALITY.

[Huntington Beach, CA]
******************************


Originally Posted by racraft View Post
Actually, you should use ALL security features of your wireless setup
yes, but most of what you said is ineffective. If you are truly concerned for wireless security, and you ought be, then you would embrace both the highest crypto (currently WPA2-AES) AND employ a RADIUS server: PSK will NOT cut it.

MAC restrictions: overcome with spoofind

withhold SSID: works akin to callerid blocking 20 years ago.. it sends a "do not look at me prefix" (analogously). "hidden" SSID can be seen with the right toys.

turning it off if you don't need wireless.
yes, radio SCHEDULING is a great idea especially if built in to your wireless AP.

ALSO, and this is VERY important to encryption: pick a UNIQUE SSID as it is the 'salt' for the (WPAx) wifi encryption. Otherwse you WILL fall victim to 'rainbow tables'.


Change the default sub net that your intranet uses.
why? That information can easily be leaked through interweb widgets like flash and java to name a few.

Make sure that the hardware firewall is turned on
Please pleaase understand that while NAT does afford a certain level of less insecurity, it is not a firewall per se. You ought but a firewall appliance or setup a DIY with opensource (untangle for example), a two nic machine, etc -- both of which should have FINE GRAIN user rules control.

you use a software firewall on each machine
only if (1) you understand exactly how it should be configured and (2) if for some VERY specific reason you need egress control that cannot be achieved via your hardware firewall appliance.

Both Juniper and Cisco make excellent soho/home firewall appliances.

IPSEC for everyone, too.


Use static IP addresses unless you absolutely have to use dynamic ones.
DHCP reservations? or static addressing to avoid DHCP? The latter can be such a joy.

...

God bless
 
  #10  
Old 11-15-09, 01:03 AM
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Nice post! Welcome to the forums. You're correct -- it does come up frequently in searches.

Since you addressed the mods early in your post, may I throw back atcha as a mod to ask you to change your user name? Business names are not allowed.

The only critiques I would have of your post would be to
(1) don't discount racraft's advice -- it is, after all, a DIY forum, not a professional's forum. He is spot-on with his suggestions for basic security for a home user.
(2) edit your post to add URLs to define the myriad acronyms you used. DIY members are here to learn, not to be overwhelmed.
 
 

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