Problem with hard wiring VoIP

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  #1  
Old 02-06-09, 12:08 PM
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Problem with hard wiring VoIP

A little background first, we just built our own home, since we have no plans for a landline, I decided to wire the phones myself in the garage, instead of paying someone to come and do them for me. We are using Vonage, and so wanted to wire the whole house to use Vonage (I know that when using a landline all I need to do is disconnect the NID at the outside of the house, I assume that using the Vonage all I need to do is connect all the lines together in the basement, plug in the Vonage adapter, and it feeds signal to all other jacks).

So, I picked up a 110 block, connector blocks, punchdown tool and went to work. But, somewhere along the line I made a mistake somewhere with this. I plugged my Vonage adapter into a phone jack last night, plugged a phone into another jack, and... nothing.

Here is what I did, hopefully it makes sense, and someone more experienced than I can tell me where I went wrong.

1) Took my 110 punch down block, and some lengths of cat5 wire, I took the blue, blue/white, orange and orange/white and threaded them onto the punch down block. I did not strip any of the wire, simply threaded the individual strands through the block. Mine pretty much looked like the 3rd picture here

2) I then took my cable that was routed from each room, stripped off some of the outer blue jacket, cut the 2 pairs that I did not want to use off. Then untwisted the blue, blue/white, orange, orange/white as little as possible, and used the punchdown tool to push them down onto the block with corresponding colors. Again, I did not strip any of the insulation, so no bare wires.

3) I then used some connecting blocks I had, and pushed them down onto the wires. These had little blade looking parts on the bottom, which looking at them it looks like they pierce the wire on the block, creating the circuit.

4) At each phone jack in the room, I connected blue to red, blue/white to green, orange to yellow, and orange/white to black.

5) Took my Vonage adapter, plugged phone line into the back, plugged other end of phone line into wall. Nothing.

6) Took a dual phone socket, plugged phone and Vonage into same wall jack. Nothing.

So, here I am wondering what I did wrong? Do I need to strip some of the insulation on the punch down block so that I have bare wire? If nothing else, I guess I can simply remove the 110 block and connect all the wires together that way, but would prefer to troubleshoot and fix what I have.

Thanks.
 
  #2  
Old 02-06-09, 04:24 PM
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Not sure if this is the same for you, but this worked for me.

I have my VoIP Adapter box in my office. The office has a dual line phone jack. Black & Yellow (using the red & green center pins) for one jack [Jack #1], and the other is the standard wiring red & green center pins [Jack #2].

From your internet modem, connect to your ATA box (VoIP - ethernet in)
From the ATA box (VoIP - telephone out) plug it into the jack which uses the black & yellow wires [Jack #1].
This will now send any calls back to your main block using the black & yellow wires.
I then connected the black and yellow wires from that one jack to the main input of your block which then feeds the phone signal to the red & green lines [jack #2, as well as the rest of the house including the office].

Basically, it takes the VoIP phone line and uses the black & yellow wires to send to the block. It then turns it around and sends the signal back to the rest of the house using the red & green wires.

Below is a crude flow path (drawing)

Internet --> VOIP
:
:
(black & yellow wires using the center red & green pins)
:
:
Main Block
(connect the black & yellow wires to the main in of block [red & green]
:
:
TO ALL PHONES
(red & green wires)
 
  #3  
Old 02-06-09, 06:04 PM
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Your mistake was in how you laid the wiring into the 110 block. The station wiring (from the various jacks) is first laid into the slots of the 110 block in the proper color coding without stripping any insulation. (I haven't done this in a while so don't ask the order, I'll provide a link) THEN you press in the 110 connector piece that connects four pair (from each station jack) and using the punchdown tool set at high impact you press the tool down over each pair of wires until the connector snaps onto the block. You do this for all station wiring.

After you have the station wiring you then do the cross connects, or in telco (telephone company) parlance, the "strapping". Turn the blade of your punchdown tool around so that it is in the seating (not cutting) position and using a piece of twisted pair (you can use the blue/blue-white pair from some scrap cable) and also maintaining polarity (blue to blue and blue-white to blue-white) start at one end of the 110 block connectors and punch down the strapping to each station connector. You can use the cutting side of the punchdown tool blade to do the first and last connection.

The 110 blocks (and also 66 blocks) do not require stripping the insulation from any of the wiring. The connections are known in the trade as IDC (for Insulation Displacement Connector) type. Once you do this you should have no more trouble by merely using a patch cable from the output jack of your Vonage ATA (Analog Telephone Adapter) into any of the wired station jacks. You might want to first test your ATA by plugging the telephone direct to the ATA to be sure it is working.

Phone-man's Home Phone Wiring Advice Page

Structured Wiring - How To - wire your own home network, video and telephone

How to Wire a Phone Jack (Voice or Telephone RJ-11 thru RJ-14)
 
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Old 02-06-09, 06:25 PM
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Here's a picture of my own 110 block. Notice that I have the connectors on for jacks 1,2 and 3 (upper left) along with two connectors in the lower right that are for the incoming telco connection (left position of the far right connector) and the original station (jacks) wiring of my house on the left position of the connector just to the left of the incoming lines.

The strapping (cross-connect is from the incoming line to the original house telephone wiring and then to first line (blue/blue-white) position of the number one station jack in my computer room. If I had the jacks in for station 2 and station 3 then the cross-connect would loop through those connectors as well.

 
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Old 02-08-09, 01:53 PM
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Thanks for the info, I think I will pull mine off the block and start again. I think my punchdown tool must be very basic, it literally just punches the wires down into the block and nothing else.

It's a non impact type, I figured it was not worth me spending $50 on something I would probably only use once. Do I need the other tool? that cuts etc? or will the one I have be OK to use?
 
  #6  
Old 02-08-09, 07:34 PM
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No, you do not absolutely need the impact type punchdown tool, it just makes it easier.

Use the punchdown tool to lightly press the individual conductors into the 110 block and then install the connector block over each four-pair set. You will have to push really hard or hit the tool with the heel of your hand to get the connectors to snap on the block. You can use a pair of really small wire cutters to trim off the exposed tail of the individual conductors.

One more thing, never try to put more than one conductor (wire) in a slot, it won't work.
 
  #7  
Old 02-09-09, 10:49 AM
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I think I am almost certain where I went wrong now, reading your replies and looking at the picture helped.

I laid down the strapping first (wrong!) and then into the same slots pushed down my station wiring (wrong!) and then pushed the connector blocks on top of this (which was extremely difficult to do, and now makes a lot of sense reading that I should never put more than 1 wire per slot).

Going to (if I get time) pull the wiring off the block tonight, will then take the following steps:

1) Slot station wiring into 110 block
2) Push the 110 connector blocks over each 4 pair
3) Run strapping to connect blocks
4) Plug in phone and hope!!

Thanks again, will hopefully be posting back tomorrow that my phones are working And, while it's annoying having to go back and do it again, it's still better than paying someone else to do it for me! (and at least all my TV wiring works!!).
 
  #8  
Old 02-13-09, 07:13 AM
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It's Working!!

Just wanted to post an update, I pulled everything off the 110 block last night. Punched down my station wires, pushed on the connector blocks (they went on so much easier now there was only 1 wire per slot) and then put on the strapping.

Plugged output jack from Vonage into wall, plugged phone into another, and dial tone!! Tried a bunch of others around the house and they all work.

Thank you for the help!!! Beer 4U2
 
 

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