Telephone distribution question/

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Old 02-28-09, 11:05 PM
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Telephone distribution question/

I want to put all the phone lines into one are in a distribution block. I want the easiest way to do it. I don't want to do a 66 or 110 block but want something that looks neat and makes my job a little easier. What do you recommend?
 
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Old 02-28-09, 11:09 PM
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I also would like to distribute cable to several rooms of the house. Again what would you recommend?
 
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Old 03-01-09, 01:52 AM
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Your life will be easy if you stick to the tried & true, which means punch-down blocks for telephone and standard splitters for RG6 TV cable. Both systems should home-run to a central closet or panel.

Why are you opposed to these methods? They can be intimidating at first, but once you've done a couple of connections they are faster, cheaper, and easier to troubleshoot than any other scheme.
 
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Old 03-01-09, 06:26 PM
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I agree with Rick, using punch-down blocks is absolutely the easiest way to distribute telephone wiring throughout you home.

However, you could take a piece of plywood and drill holes in it to allow for 8-32 brass bolts. Make the bolts long enough that at least an inch, maybe two inches, extends out from the plywood. Using a combination of flat brass washers and nuts you can then connect the two, four or more telephone individual conductors to each bolt. Insert a bolt through the plywood and add a washer and nut. Tighten the nut securely. For each conductor add two washers and a nut. Strip the insulation from a conductor and bend it into a hook shape and insert it between the two washers and add the nut, tightening securely. Do NOT wrap the wire around the bolt as it may become enmeshed with the threads and this will break the wire. Add another two washers and nut for each succeeding conductor.

See, the punch-down block is far easier.
 
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Old 03-01-09, 06:39 PM
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Old 03-01-09, 08:47 PM
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..if you dont mind terminating each and every drop run to a rj45/rj11 end.. then that box would be nice.

Myself, I prefer the BIX cross connect system.. but ya do need the tool for it.

http://www.belden.com/pdfs/03Belden_...r/15.13_17.pdf
 
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Old 03-01-09, 09:36 PM
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You have to terminate these? or are you referring to the outlet that you plug the phone into?
 
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Old 03-02-09, 12:23 PM
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Yes, you certainly do need to terminate the station (jacks) cables in the linked modules. Furthermore, you would probably need to use patch cords with them. I also think the price is outrageous, you can get a 66 block for about ten bucks.

I used a 66 block in my previous house and had extreme versatility. I had two-line capability in each room and I could change the order of the line-to-jack in less than a minute if necessary. It was an extremely neat looking arrangement. In my present house I am using half of a 110 block I picked up out of the junk pile at work. I have pictured this several times as a work-in-progress along with cable TV and Ethernet patch panel. Here is just the 110 block for the telephones. It has the capability of four incoming lines, an RJ-31X for an alarm panel and four distinct lines to each station.

A standard 110 block would have the ability of 24) 4-line (8 conductor) station cables. Once you have all the station cables punched in you can "cross-connect" in just about any arrangement that you could conceive. A 66 block (depending on the arrangement) could offer you up to 25) 2-line stations.

What is your reluctance to using punch-down blocks? If it's the punch-down tool you can purchase a non-impact tool for about ten bucks and an impact tool for about 25 bucks.
 
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Old 03-02-09, 12:29 PM
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It looks confusing to me at this time. I have never done it before. What does this look like?
Open House H619 RJ-45 Telephone Interface Hub - Distribute Phone Service to 12 Home Loacations
How easy would this be?
 
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Old 03-02-09, 01:19 PM
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The hub you linked to looks confusing to me. From a quick glance at the instruction manual it seems that it is more for a home that has numerous pre-made flexible cables to all telephone locations. If you are running regular category 3 (or category 5e) cable from all the telephone jacks to a central location you would be required to terminate the cable with modular plugs to use one of the patch panels (hubs) you have linked to in your several posts. You DO NOT want to terminate solid conductor station wiring to modular plugs as it WILL FAIL eventually. Furthermore, it is much more difficult to terminate an eight-conductor cable to a modular plug than it is to punch down individual conductors to a 66 or 110 block.

I know it looks intimidating at first but if you take it one cable (or even one conductor) at a time it soon becomes simple and quite logical. Here are a couple of links for you to read in depth about telephone and data wiring.

Phone-man's Home Phone Wiring Advice Page

Structured Wiring - How To - wire your own home network, video and telephone
 
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Old 03-02-09, 01:43 PM
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I have all cat5e wire already terminated purchased for cheaper than I could get for bulk. I have a ton of them. It will all be going to a central location. I could cut it all if I had to but I don't understand why I would do that. If you had all your wires factory terminated what would you do? That is my question. I should have stated that earlier.
I could go to the 110 block if needed but I like the look of this hub. I do have a question if you would be willing to answer it. If you choose not to I understand as you think I am nuts already but here it goes. If I bring in the outside wire and terminate it to the left block on the hub and run all my wires which were pre-terminated to the wall outlets, what do I plug into the outlet? I mean, I want to keep it cat5e, so how would I plug the phone into the outlet if it is RJ45? Does this make any sense? Thanks for all your responses though.
 
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Old 03-02-09, 02:18 PM
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Are you telling me that all your telephone and data jacks have cables run to a central location AND have modular plugs attached to their ends? If yes, I hope they are all stranded cables because modular plugs on solid conductors is just asking for trouble. I also hope that the ends at the station jacks are plugged into double-ended modular jacks and NOT punched down on IDC jacks because stranded conductors on IDC connectors is as bad, if not worse, than solid conductors in modular plugs.

No, I don't think you're nuts but you may be misinformed. Your coming here and asking questions shows that you want to learn and do this in the correct manner.

If I understand the last question correctly, that you have all RJ45 jacks throughout the house and you want to use these for regular telephone usage and are asking about plugging the telephone into these RJ45 jacks...A standard RJ11 (or RJ14 two-line) telephone modular plug fits an RJ45 jack just fine. It just doesn't connect with the "outside" (pairs 3 and 4) cable pairs of a 4-pair category 5 cable.
 
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Old 03-02-09, 03:04 PM
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To a central location, no, not at this time but a bunch of the wiring in the house is going to be replace with new as a major renovation project is underway. All cables have modular plugs factory installed. Each cable is made of 24AWG pure copper twisted pair conduits with 50u" gold plated contacts (short body). Nothing is anywhere right now. The phone lines are old and full of static. I tried replacing and it sounds so much better that is what I have decided to do with the phone line. I bought the cable because it was such a special deal and it is good quality I know for sure.
When you say double ended modular jacks I am not sure I know what you are talking about. Do you mean the ones that have RJ45 females on each side? Like this
CAT5E RJ45 Inline Keystone Coupler Black Color
 
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Old 03-02-09, 03:23 PM
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Yep, those keystone coupler jacks are what I would recommend under your scenario.

You must have gotten quite a deal if those pre-made cables are going to be cheaper than running bulk cable. If you are only going to use them for telephone I see no problem but unless you got several different lengths you will have to coil up a fair amount of unneeded length of cable. This could have a deleterious effect if you also use them for Ethernet data transfer.
 
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Old 03-02-09, 03:42 PM
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I have various lengths from a couple of 25' to a bunch of 50' which is what I really needed a lot of,plus a couple of 75' and 100'. I will be using these for both network and phone. They will be separate lines though. The network will have it's own cables and the phone will be separate from that.

Great deal. Actually they were a couple pennies more per cable when I figured it out but then I had to figure adding the modular plugs and time so it worked out cheaper.


Ok, so you seem to be going along with me now. That is giving me a little more confidence that what I am planning on doing is not that bad (not as good as yours but not that bad). If I go with that hub would you help me out with the wiring aspect of it on how I would do it. Open House H619 RJ-45 Telephone Interface Hub - Distribute Phone Service to 12 Home Loacations

The house will have 2 phone lines. How would you recommend hooking all of this up? Take the wire coming into the house and hook it up to the block on the left. Then hook up the cable to the outs and run them to their location and hook them up into the keystone coupler we talked about. Plug in the phones RJ11 jack but how do I make sure the lines connect to the Rj11properly? I am confused a little about that right now. I think I need a nap to rest my brain.
 
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Old 03-02-09, 04:16 PM
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Using all plug-in components will be a little bit more difficult but not insurmountable. The easiest way to accommodate two incoming telephone lines would be to only use two-line telephones with RJ14 connections but that may get a bit expensive. Assuming you want the second line for business use or perhaps for children so they won't tie up the first line you could just use the two-line telephone in those areas where the second line is necessary.

Or you could use a RJ14-to-two-RJ11 breakout box to separate the RJ45 (being used as a RJ14) to two RJ11s and plug the second telephone into the corresponding jack of the breakout box.

Or you could install two (or perhaps more) of your central modules and with some judicious usage of the station cables and maybe a couple of custom patch cables you could get the two different incoming telephone lines routed to where you desire.

Now that you probably need at least two of those hubs along with either breakout boxes and/or two-line telephones I'm wondering just how much you have saved by buying the pre-made cables. For me, even if the pre-made cables had been free they wouldn't have been any bargain.
 
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Old 03-02-09, 04:21 PM
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I think I got it. Correct me if I am wrong. I will go through the punch down like it shows.
The plugs are a standard standard 568A which will work perfectly with a two line phone RJ14 plug at the end of my run. Anyway I plug the cat5e already terminated great deal for me cables into the hub and run them to their destinations. Along the way I need a drink. When I get them to their destinations I plug them into their keystone couplers and snap that into the wall plates. I just plug in my RJ14 plug which will fit perfectly and away we go. Two lines baby. Is that all there is to this stuff, piece of cake.Beer 4U2
Correct if I am wrong though, but be easy on me. I have a soft heart and am offended easily.:moonu:
 
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Old 03-02-09, 04:26 PM
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They have to be two line phones so RJ14 will be needed. One is a business line and the other home phone line.
 
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Old 03-03-09, 06:42 PM
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That's pretty much all there is to it. The "In" and "Out" jacks can be confusing, but they're really just paralleled to everything on the board.

Heck, if you have less than 12 phones and hate the thought of terminating to the 110 block just use a biscuit (surface-mount modular telephone jack) from the phone company's NID and an RJ14 jumper to the "In" jack.

Line 1 will be on the blue pair, and Line 2 will be on the orange pair.
 
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Old 04-25-09, 06:56 PM
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I'm at about the same stage as wendans was in planning my home wiring. I have looked at enough pictures of 66 blocks and 110 blocks and seen several diagrams and I can see how it would be easier to work with and install the lines on than with hubs/modules like the ones shown in the links in this thread.

Punching down the wires into the block at one end and punching them down at the other end into jacks would be much faster and easier than the alternative, punching them down into the block then into the jacks on the hubs, then making your own patch cables and crimping RJ45 connectors onto each end. By using the hub method you've added an extra layer of complexity where more can go wrong.

But what about after the job is finished? You have the wall jacks plugged into a punchdown block so your system is not as easily re-configurable as if you had used hubs/modules.
For example, I want to add other features such as cameras, Camera Hub > Camera Systems > Connected Home > Leviton Integrated Networks and Controls > All Leviton Products from Leviton Electrical and Electronic Products
and a network switch. I want these features available to all the jacks. Maybe I'm wrong, but it seems to me that if you wire a cable from the block directly to the jack, you're limited to 2-way communication. But if you wire the cable to a jack on a hub, then plug a patch cable into the hub and run that to the jack, then you've multiplied your communication possibilities. Now you can plug more cables into the hub. And you can use another patch cable to connect a completely different hub to the first hub.

So I don't understand the subject completely but I'm trying to understand it so I can build the best network here, and the picture I'm getting is that these hubs and modules being sold by Leviton and Smarthome, etc. are more expensive and time-consuming to install but you can do more with them.

But I still haven't decided which method to install. I'm looking for more pros and cons to help me make the decision. I successfully made a working patch cable yesterday but it was frustrating and took a long time to get it right. I'd rather not make them if I don't have to.
 
 

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