DSL Home Run vs. Multi Drop

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Old 10-22-10, 12:53 PM
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DSL Home Run vs. Multi Drop

I have just had a line run to the house for DSL stand alone service from AT&T. The house is wired with jacks which I understand to be a multi-drop system, i.e., one continus loop with 2 separate wire terminations in the basement. When the installation tech checked for a circuit at the location that I wish to use for the DSL connection, he didn't get a signal. I understand that a homerun system is required for a LAN, but I'm not entirely sure what that means unless there are multiple taps on that line. However, I'm only going to be using the one jack at a computer for internet access. I do have a cordless phone that I will be attempting to use with a VOIP adapter at that point (say Vonage, perhaps MagicJack, or even with DSL phone service from AT&T as I have cordless phones).

My questions are: 1) should a multi-drop line should work for the above if I am only using the one outlet?, 2) should the tech have been able to detect a signal with an intact wiring system whether it was a homerun sytem or not?, 3) can I make it a homerun system by merely disconnecting the leads that "continue" the circuit at the jack (realizing that this may prevent future multi-drop connections on the circuit?, and 4) could a subsequent user who wanted a conventional system be able to convert it thereto just by reconnecting the leads at the jack?

I am confused by the fact that the tech said that the problem might be that it was not a homerun system because it is now my understanding that the fact that there were only 2 wires in the basement makes it a multi-drop system by definition, and that, in that case, he should have known already that it was not a homerun system. I understand that, in fact, there should have been only one line in the basement for a multi-drop, and that the second line might just be redundant in that it "continued" on from the last connected outlet unnecessarily.
 
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Old 10-22-10, 04:40 PM
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You should be able to connect those two active wires to a DSL modem and be online. Those two active wires are the ones that enter your house. Those should be the same two wires that are distributed, so if everything is wired properly you should be able to connect the DSL modem to any phone jack in the house.
 
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Old 10-22-10, 05:10 PM
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if you only have "two wires "vs two pair than the problem may be substandard untwisted wiring . I'm not real sure how DSL will travel on untwisted pairs it really depends on how far you are from the DSLAM

more then likely its a poor connection somehow from the basement to where your trying to connect . I would pull all jacks prior to the one you want to use and splice the wires to insure continuity ., I wouldn't connect anything downstream of the modem destination . doing this you would in effect be creating a home run

the two wires are a old bell way of running loop cabling vs home-run its basically two ends of the same cable ......start it the basement , loop through the hose end at the basement ...

as to weather he should have been able to "detect a signal " if it aint there , it aint there and somebody needs to troubleshoot
 
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Old 10-22-10, 05:34 PM
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the installation tech checked for a circuit at the location that I wish to use for the DSL connection, he didn't get a signal. I
But as others asked did he get a signal at the NID, the place where the Phonco wires connect to the house wiring. If no signal there then that needs to be fixed first. The house wiring may be ok. Note DSL will work on a single wire so even if one wire of a pair is bad you may be able to get a signal with just one good wire. I don't recommend that just saying it is possible.
 
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Old 10-23-10, 04:49 AM
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Question Further developments

As the original poster, things have gotten "curiouser". To clarify things a bit, I was able to set up the gateway provided by AT&T at the NID. Two conducting wires are run to the basement from the NID (blue and white). Subsequent to setting up the gateway, I connected the leads from the NID to the red and green wires of the 4conductor cables used for running to the jacks without regard to any color matching. Using the gateway as a tester, I tested several jacks, including the one jack I wish to use, to see if I had a DSL connection. Being unable to get a connection on the jack that I wished to use (as reported by the tech - no continuity with his tone tester), I disconnected the red and green "continuing" leads on the jack and tested the circuit again with no success. I then tested several jacks in the house without success either except for one in the kitchen. I then disconnected the wires from the NID from the distribution cabling and connected them to the red and green from the other end of the loop in the basement without success at any jack except, again, for the one in the kitchen of this 2 story house. I reconnected the 2 wires previously disconnected at the jack I wished to use and retested the various jacks again without success except that the one in the kitchen is still working - I'm on the gateway now, wirelessly. I do not understand how it could be that I'm able to connect to the jack in the kitchen when it is wired from either end of the loop where other jacks in the loop are not working and even when there is a break purposely made in the loop. Fortunately, I'm able to run a cable directly to the jack I want to use, but that leaves me dead in the water for the other jacks if I, or subsequent owners, should ever want to tap into those. I can diagnose that problem later, but I don't understand what is going on with the situation now.
 
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Old 10-23-10, 06:37 AM
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Originally Posted by Stranded View Post
I'm on the gateway now, wirelessly.
Are you trying to connect your computer to the phone line to get to the DSL router? That won't work.

Each (wired) computer needs a "home run" Cat5e or Cat6 cable. "Home run" means the cable runs directly from a computer to the router. One cable per computer.

A phone line is a circulating cable made up of at least one twisted pair of wires. The cable can branch off at any point to feed individual jacks, or it can "daisy chain" from jack to jack. The DSL router must be connected to the phone line.

If you have a multimeter, you can check to see if you have good connections at all jacks. Disconnect the house from the NID and attach a 9-volt battery to the house pair(s). Take your meter - set to DC volts - and see if you have voltage at each jack. Check all of the pairs of wires -- someone may have swapped them before you bought the house. If you don't have voltage, there's a break in the wiring somewhere.

Did this house have an alarm system that was disconnected?
 
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Old 10-24-10, 06:44 PM
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As indicated, I was connecting the gateway to the DSL lines to diagnose the connection at various jacks, not having diagnostic tools at hand. so there was no attempt to connect the computer directly to the phone line.

The home run connection that is relevant I understand to be from the NID to the gateway, not from the router to the computer. I've since run a separate DSL line near the computer which I successfully connected the gateway to and accessed the internet.

I've found that there are evidently some "compromises" in the wiring to explain the problems initially described. Re that, I opened up several of the jacks and found that at least one was not in a continuing loop but that the wires terminated there. Also, curiously, one of the jacks was wired with both the "feed" 2 pair wiring but wires leading away were 5 pair, albeit all being connected properly (red and green only). Testing of that situation remains, but evidently the wiring was done by elves. (This is a new installation and there was no previous alarm system connected).
 
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Old 10-25-10, 06:18 PM
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Typically when we use the term home run, we are referring to the pair of wires being uninterrupted from the nid outside to the jack where the modem/gateway will reside.

I'm assuming by standalone you mean that you have no land line phone service. If that's the case the 9 volt battery trick that Rick mentioned may be the only way to test.

Chances are the wires at the jack your trying to use do not make it outside to the nid, or they show up on a different pair than the tech expected them to.

Any way to post pictures of the wiring in your NID and at a couple of the jacks in question? The white/blue outside and the red/green inside is throwing me off. Do you see the white/blue wire inside any other jacks inside?
 
 

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