Using # 22 4 strand wire for telephones?

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Old 01-19-11, 12:42 PM
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Using # 22 4 strand wire for telephones?

I just bought an alarm system and I have a ton of leftover #22 wire. Can I use this instead of having to buy CAT 5 for the telephones.
 
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Old 01-19-11, 03:13 PM
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Yep, as long as you don't have punch down blocks. Solid wire will punch down fine ,but not stranded. If you just have the standard screw terminals, then go for it. It used to be all telephone wiring was 4/C 22, but normally solid.
 
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Old 01-19-11, 04:33 PM
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Thanks, yes it is solid wire. I assume punch down blocks are the connections where you simply push the wires into a v-groove on the plate.
 
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Old 01-19-11, 05:06 PM
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if you are only using this wire for phone then you are safe i have seen contractors use thermostat wire for phone. I suggesr CAT 3 cable for phone and CAT 5 or better for network. just check the type of jack that it is rated for the wire guage you have. any other question about telecom let me know
 
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Old 01-20-11, 03:45 AM
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I wouldn't use it if it's not twisted-pair. It will be susceptible to interference.

For the record, stranded wire (in cable) is used all the time with punch blocks in the audio industry for mic & tie lines in pro sound and broadcast systems, and even for speaker lines in school paging systems. 18 awg to 22 awg will punch into a 66 block. 20 to 24 will punch into a BICS. The wires are not stripped before punching, so the insulation helps hold it together. The bare shields are given a twist and pulled tight before punching.
 
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Old 01-20-11, 01:19 PM
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Floor joists and 22awg

I'm running out of holes to push all of my wires through in my basement. My floor joists are starting to look like swiss cheese with all the runs I've done.. Can the 22 awg wire that will be used for alarms and telephones be in the same hole as as 12-3 or 14-2 wire?

Rick Johnston - Does the interference increase with the length of the wire.....I have one short run and one long one?
 
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Old 01-20-11, 04:16 PM
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when running cable for telecom all runs should cross any AC circuit at a 90 degree angle so not to pick up induction never run next to each other. look for anouther route you could staple it along a support beam or such. give me a few ideas and i will tell you which is the best. hpoe i can help
 
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Old 01-20-11, 04:32 PM
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Originally Posted by bish80 View Post
Does the interference increase with the length of the wire.....I have one short run and one long one?
Interference is caused by proximity to a noise source, not the length of cable. Twisted-pair telephone cables reject noise because of the twists in the wires inside the cable. If the 4-conductor cable you plan to use doesn't have two pairs twisted around each other, every time that cable gets near an AC line, dimmer, fluorescent light ballast, HVAC motor, or other source of electrical noise, you will hear a hum or buzz in the phone line. If you want to get farther into it, look up Common Mode Rejection.

As Mr.fios said, you want to keep the low-voltage cables as far away from the AC power cables as you can.
 
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Old 01-24-11, 10:49 AM
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Thanks guys, that was a big help. I always like posting here because I learn so much.
 
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Old 01-24-11, 08:56 PM
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If ya can, get a length (or box) of proper cat5 4 pair cable (or cat5e if ya can). If not you, the next owner might want to put in some data or even video over dsl etc. Once its all in and closed up, you might kick yourself down the road if you cheap-out.

Keep that alarm wire for doorbells and thermostats.
 
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Old 01-31-11, 07:49 PM
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Doorbells, can I use if for the doorbells?
 
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