Punch old four-strand wire into Cat5e modular jack?

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Old 04-20-11, 09:57 AM
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Punch old four-strand wire into Cat5e modular jack?

Hello.

Doing some renos and while I'm at it, rewiring the house with Cat5e where I can (data & voice). All the Cat5e will go back to a pair of patch panels (one for data, one for voice) in my networking box (small switch for data, dsl modem, pair of patch panels and a few other things).

But, not running the Cat5e until later this summer and one of the rooms I'm working on now currently has a single phone line (old, four-strand green/red/black/yellow). This is one of the rooms that will have the wiring replaced with Cat5e later this summer, but in the short term, I'm wondering if it's possible to punch the four-strand wiring into a Cat5e modular jack that I've already installed, just so I have a temporary phone in this room until I run the Cat5e later?

I know four-stand to Cat5e wiring goes...

green > white/blue
red > blue
black > white/orange
yellow > orange

But, I'm just unsure if it's possible to actually punch that old wiring into a Cat5e modular jack? If that is possible, do I need a different punchdown tool, or is my 110 punchdown tool (which I use for punching my Cat5e cable) going to be OK?

Any advice would be appreciated!

Thanks,
Kristin.
 
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  #2  
Old 04-20-11, 11:27 AM
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"D" wire, the standard two-pair (four conductor) cable is usually 24 gauge and Cat5 is usually 26 gauge. The answer to your question is yes, but. Yes, you can punch down the 24 gauge wire BUT it might spread the IDC (insulation displacement connection) to the point that subsequent punch-down of 26 gauge wire may not make a good connection, it depends upon the quality of the IDC to begin with.

Yes, you may use the same punch-down tool if you are referring to a spring-loaded impact tool although you might have to set the tension higher. If you have a non-impact tool you will have to push (or hit) it harder.

I would use a new jack when eventually installing the Cat5 cable. The jacks are cheap enough that it just isn't worth the potential problem of reuse.
 
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Old 04-20-11, 11:39 AM
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Thanks Furd exactly what I was looking for. I have a bunch of Cat5e jacks, so I'll just replace it with a new one when I run the Cat5s cable later this summer!
Thanks again!
k.
 
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Old 04-21-11, 04:03 AM
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Originally Posted by Furd View Post
"D" wire, the standard two-pair (four conductor) cable is usually 24 gauge and Cat5 is usually 26 gauge.
You may want to check that, Furd. The Cat 5e spec says it must be 24 awg and the connectors must be able to take 22 - 24.

The confusion may be because the same gauge of stranded wire is slightly larger than solid.
 
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Old 04-21-11, 09:44 PM
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Yeah, you're right Rick. The D wire is 22 gauge and the cat5 is 24 gauge. Still, once the IDC connector has been spread by the larger wire it may not be secure if re-terminated to smaller wire.
 
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