Help figuring out network interface device...

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  #1  
Old 09-18-12, 08:54 PM
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Help figuring out network interface device...

I am providing a link to a picture of the box outside my house. This doesn't look like pictures of network interface devices I see on the internet. As you can see, there is nothing attached to the courtesy jacks.

I have a great deal of static on my line, and when it rains I often lose the phone entirely. I would like to be able to determne whether the problem is on my end or the phone company's end, but am not sure how to do that without the jacks.

I am also wondering whether this box is my responsibility or the phone company's.

85922937-7A17-48C3-86CC-C9995E644AAD-10539-00001341DA228D15_zpsc2c62a11-1.jpg picture by joublie - Photobucket

Thanks for any advice on how to start approaching this!
 
  #2  
Old 09-19-12, 03:18 AM
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Welcome to the forums.

That looks like a simple junction "biscuit" where the feed from the NID is split to the house wiring. It could certainly be a cause of noise, but it doesn't seem to be your NID.

Can you see where the cable enters the house? The NID is usually on the other side of that wall penetration.
 
  #3  
Old 09-19-12, 05:34 AM
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You may not even have a NID. ( I didn't)I would call the phone company to report the noise and they may put a modern NID. Normally the wire going to that device (and the device) is the phone companies. Wiring after that is your problem. I would clean up what is "after" , maybe get a temporary jack for testing purposes, then call them. Use Rick's advice to find the first connection point in your house to verify what you posted is the first connection point.
 
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Old 09-19-12, 10:05 PM
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Thanks for the input. It seems I probably don't have an NID. The phone cable runs from the pole across my yard directly to this box (which is on the outside of my house).

Tribe_fan, I'd like to explore the idea of using a temporary jack for testing. Can anyone give me any input into how to go about doing that? This is definitely my first connection point.
 
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Old 09-20-12, 04:51 AM
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Telephone noise rejection relies on connections to twisted pairs of wires. Am I looking cross-eyed at your picture, or do I see only the blue and white/orange wires connected to the gray cables? The twisted pairs are blue & white/blue, and orange & white/orange.

The blue pair is used for Line 1, and the orange for Line 2 if you have one. In your case, since the orange pair from the telco isn't connected, you only have one incoming phone line.

I'll bet a lot of the noise goes away if you change the white/orange wires to the white/blue wires at every jack.
 
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Old 09-20-12, 10:04 AM
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I cant tell the colors from the picture but -
You have identified "your side" and the "Phone company side"

Get an RJ11 from Home Depot - its square and the cover comes off to connect the wires. You could also "borrow" one if you have one installed inside your house.
Label and remove the wires on "your side" - Like Rick said there is only two wires involved.(there may be multiple wires on each terminal)
Wire from the terminals to the RJ11 - There are 4 terminals, but you only use the center pair.
Plug a phone into it. If you don't get a dial tone, then reverse the wires.

If you have noise - call the phone company.
If not, then follow Rick's advice !

I am assuming you have disconnected every phone in your house before doing all this.
I also never saw something like this outside - on my old house the block is in the garage. It needs to be shielded from the weather.

I heard you could get a "tingle" if someone calls you when touching the wire, but I don't think is dangerous. (unless it causes you to fall of a ladder)

Edit - I just looked at the picture again - you should be able to connect to the courtesy Jack if they are not too corroded - (and disconnecting "your side" to test.)
 
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Old 09-21-12, 09:46 AM
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It is obviously differences from telco to telco. If this is exposed to rain, you may get some trouble when it gets wet.
If you are going to handle this yourselves, it is a lot of options. 1: Move it indors. 2: put up a fairly closed box instead of the exisiting one. 3: The no cost solution: cut a soda bottle in two screw it on the wall with the opening down by loosing the existing box from the wall, and put it back with the bottle on.

You should as mentioned over use the twisted pairs together "color and white with same color stripe" If some of the wires are connected with only one wire, it will be unbalance witch may cause hum. Disconnect, or connect both wires in a pair.

Touching the bare copper may be felt unpleasant, especially if its ringing, and could be harmful if you have heart trouble.

dsk
 
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Old 10-10-12, 08:44 PM
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It looks like what you have there is simply a duplex jack attached to the side of your house installed by who knows who. I doubt a telco tech would have installed that as a NID. You should have some sort of lightning supression on your incoming lines. If those 2 grey blocks on the right are jacks as it looks to me, make sure they are not corroded and shorting out. Better yet, call the phone company and have them install the proper equipment. If there is a lightning strike in the near vicinity it could fry any equipment you have plugged into your phone system.
 
 

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