Connect cable phone system to home wiring

Reply

  #1  
Old 05-01-13, 02:01 PM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 7
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Connect cable phone system to home wiring

I used to have 2 Verizon landlines (main residential and a second line for work). I replaced the work line with cable voice system but kept the Verizon resi landline (reliable during extended power outages in our rural area). The work line is located close to the cable modem so easily set up. Now I want to move the work line location and thought I could connect the cable voice to my home wiring so as to access it from an existing wall jack. I've researched the steps online but am new to this and have run into some confusing issues. Some (or all) of the following may be incorrect including my terminology.

I do not have an external NID (there is a box outside but I see no customer access section) but have the setup shown in the attached pictures. The top box is an alarm system, next is a Network Interface with a modular jack connecting it to an entrance bridge. One picture shows the wiring in an existing wall jack. The top jack has no dial tone and the bottom jack carries home Verizon line. (Unconnected blue/white blue wires have exposed copper and I assume should be taped off).

I believe I need to disconnect my home wiring from the telephone company first. Since I want to keep my existing land line, I assume this means I must disconnect the green/white green wires on my entrance bridge as these match the top connection on the wall jack (no dial tone). Then simply connect my cable modem to the matching wall jack.

However, I unplugged the modular jack from the Network Interface assuming it would cut off my landline dial tone but that didn't happen. I plugged a working phone into the Network Interface but had no dial tone. Also, the yellow/black wires are not connected to the bridge. The orange/white orange wires are butt plugged to red/blue wires. (Orange wiring is connected to the bottom wall jack). Am completely confused and not sure how to figure out what I should do. Any suggestions?
 
Attached Images      
  #2  
Old 05-01-13, 02:44 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 60,786
Received 1,326 Votes on 1,225 Posts
The plate with the swivel/locking cover looks to be your NID at that location. Both phone numbers would have appeared there at that block. Now you would find only one active number there.

Drew a pic for you. I may have the phone numbers backwards but that's where you would make your phone line changes.
 
Attached Images  
  #3  
Old 05-01-13, 04:13 PM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 7
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks. I assumed that is my NID but I thought that if I remove the modular jack to the NID and plug in a phone I should get a dial tone (but I don't) and when I unplug that modular jack I still have a dial tone on my working phone line (which I'd expect not to happen). Do I have that wrong?
 
  #4  
Old 05-02-13, 03:00 AM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 60,786
Received 1,326 Votes on 1,225 Posts
Yes....you still have a working phone when you unplug that modular plug since you are getting one of your lines from the cable modem. That test port is only for the incoming Verizon lines.

There are two phone lines in that modular plug. When you plugged in your test phone it would connect to the red/green pair only. Your active line must be on the black/yellow pair.
 
  #5  
Old 05-02-13, 05:16 AM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 7
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The phone that still works when I unplug the NID is the Verizon line. I have checked it on a wall jack in another room. The NID itself has no dial tone. The cable modem is plugged directly into a separate phone not tied into my home wiring. (To be certain it wasn't affecting anything I even unplugged the cable when I checked my wall jack for a dial tone).

In one of my pictures you may be able to see that the black/yellow pair from the NID is not connected to the bridge. I am starting to think that my home Verizon line bypasses the NID (not sure why this should be) and that the NID is only for my old Verizon work line (the NID has a 4 digit number on it that I've checked and discovered is the business number of the previous owner). If so, it seems I just unplug the NID so that I can connect my cable to the home wiring. But that leaves me wondering if I should do something about the way my Verizon line is connected.

I appreciate your assistance and hope I am not simply being dense here.
 
  #6  
Old 05-02-13, 07:05 AM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 7
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I think I confused things in an earlier post when I referred to my Verizon line as my "working line" (meant that it is up and running...could be confused with my cable line for work). Sorry.
 
  #7  
Old 05-02-13, 09:29 AM
T
Member
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 614
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I'm not following the story 100% but one thing to consider is that the alarm guys may have re-wired your incoming line to hit the alarm box first for line seizure purposes.
 
  #8  
Old 05-02-13, 01:06 PM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 7
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the idea, Toolmon. I am away on business for a day so can't trace what's going on with the alarm until I get back. I do know that the alarm system can dial out on my Verizon line and has a cellular back up so the alarm is connected to my resi line.
 
  #9  
Old 05-02-13, 01:12 PM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 7
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
In looking back at my original post I think part of it could use clarification. When I got the cable phone service, I simply discontinued one of my Verizon lines and connected a phone directly to the cable modem. Now I am relocating that phone to another part of the house far from the modem so I thought I could connect the modem to my home wiring...which is how I started trying to figure out my Verizon connection, NID, etc.
 
  #10  
Old 05-02-13, 04:02 PM
F
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,495
Received 36 Votes on 28 Posts
Residential telephone wiring is quite straightforward and easy to do. What complicates matters is that while there ARE standard color codes and practices the field work is often done in the most expedient manner rather than in strict accordance with the best practice. Compounding this is when homeowners or handymen make changes but do not follow the standards.

There are several different types of cable used with residential telephones depending on the area and the age of the wiring. Most common up to about 20 years age was Bell specification "D" wire which consisted of four individual conductors of red, green, yellow and black. This was normally used for a single line telephone connected to the red and green wires with the yellow and black either not terminated or one (or sometimes both) terminated to earth ground. Older telephone sets that had a lighted dial might require a transformer and if so the transformer output (6-8 volts AC) was connected to yellow and black for this dial light. More modern phones with a dial light use an LED that derives its power from the telephone line itself so it works with only two wires.

In the same era if you had a two-line (or possibly a three-line) telephone with no auxiliary functions, (common ringing, hold, intercom, call transfer or the like) you would likely have Bell specification "G" wire and this was the first of the "category" cables. It has three paired sets of conductors and could support up to thee lines of service and no auxiliary functions. The pairs would be colored blue with a white tracer paired to a white with a blue tracer, orange-white/white-orange and green-white/white-green.

Today telephone cable is often category 5e or category 6 simply because those are common for data wiring. In truth, category 3 is still the standard for voice telephone service. All three of these "category" cables have four twisted pairs of individual wires and the color codes are the same; blue-white, orange-white, green white and brown white. Sometimes you will find a telephone-only cable that has five pairs and the fifth pair is slate(grey)-white.

Now, after all that useless trivia, what you need to do is unravel that rat's nest of wires and cable you have so that you can determine exactly what it active telephone (from Verizon) and what is something else. Then you need to determine what among the something else was used for the second Verizon line. Once you do that the rest is easy.
 
  #11  
Old 05-05-13, 03:10 PM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 7
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the info. I haven't been able to spend time on the wiring yet. Should have a friend coming over who knows more about this to help me sort it out sometime in the coming week.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: