Comcast self installation

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Old 11-05-16, 03:42 PM
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Comcast self installation

About three years ago, Verizon took away cooper line coming to my house, and replaced with fiber optic. This is while I had Comcast, and XFinity Internet worked without problem. I then switched to Verizon for two year contract, and now I want to go back to Comcast. I used the same coax line coming out of wall outlet for both Comcast and Verizon. However, outside my front door right under Verizon Telco Box (see the pics), there is a Verizon splitter. To self-install Comcast, do I simply disconnect the wire on the side of splitter where there's one connection, and then connect the wire that has a weather cap on to the splitter? 2 years ago when switching from Comcast to Verizon, the Verizon tech told me that he has weather capped the comcast line and showed me the lines I'm showing in the pics.

Another question is once I switch back to Comcast, can the Verizon Fios backup batter unit be unplugged in my garage?

Many thanks. I look forward for your knowledges and advices.
 
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Old 11-05-16, 03:52 PM
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You cannot remove Verizon equipment but you can shut it off.

You can use the same coax feed to inside but you'll need to switch back to a new Comcast modem/router. You can remove the splicer and cap from the Comcast line and put it on the Verizon coax.

And of course.... Verizon will want their modem/router back.
 
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Old 11-05-16, 04:08 PM
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May I ask why you want to go back to Comcast?
 
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Old 11-05-16, 04:44 PM
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So I think you're saying that I just need to disconnect Verizon line on the Verizon splitter (I think you're calling this a splicer) wich I'm showing in the pics and then remove the cap on the Comcast line and connect it to Verizon splitter? Did I understand you right?

Of course, I'm not going to remove any Verizon equipment (Telco box, and backup battery unit), and I will need to buy or lease a Comcast DOCSIS 3.0 cable modem. That I understand. I just wanted to check that Fios backup battery unit can be unplugged from power outlet in my garage when the switch to Comcast is done.

If I understood right, do you mean Verizon Telco box can be powered off after switching to Comcast? Thanks.
 
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Old 11-05-16, 04:47 PM
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Comcast has a good one year promotion in my area which beats the price hike from Verizon by enough $ amount that justifies switching.
 
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Old 11-05-16, 06:23 PM
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A few questions.

1. What services do you receive from Verizon? Telephone, television and Internet are the choices and you could have any combination of services.

2. Have you asked Verizon to meet, or beat, the Comcast price for the same services? If not, I suggest that you do.

3. Are you going to retain any of the Verizon services?

If it is a clean break from Verizon then yes, you can unplug the Verizon power supply but be sure to also unplug the back-up battery.

I don't know how YOUR set-up is but as I understand the Verizon ONT (optical network terminal) has a coaxial cable that goes to the modem/router in the house and this coaxial cable has a tee (not a splitter) that sends the signal on its way. From the tee it WOULD go to a signal splitter to split to more than one jack. The modem/router is necessary for either Internet or television service as I understand the system. I do not have television service from my FiOS so I could be completely wrong on this point.

Telephone service is direct from the ONT and if you retain telephone service you WILL need to keep the power supply plugged in.

I personally think that going back to Comcast is a step backwards. My Internet was so improved when I went from Comcast to Verizon I would NEVER go back. I could not even use VoIP service on Comcast but on Verizon it was perfect. I get my television service via antenna but IF I had to go "cable" I would definitely go with the Verizon, or in my area now, Frontier.
 
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Old 11-05-16, 07:39 PM
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I had switched to the Optimum online cable triple play package because Verizon was being stubborn. When the Optimum contract was ready to expire they were playing hardball and refused to budge. FiOS had just started a new package requiring a two year signup. The package included a $300 gift Visa card. I jumped back to FiOS. They do have the best system.

This year my contract expired and I renewed with FiOS. It came to a $10 a month increase and in exchange for that increase they gave me 50mb up and 50mb down internet service.

Most of the time you need to go with the triple play (phone-internet-TV) in order to get any kind of package deal.

The cable system internet has many slow times..... especially from 6PM-9PM.
I wouldn't consider a change back to cable now.

Your are correct with the FiOS system. The cable leaves the ONT and goes to a standard two port splitter. One split feeds the modem/router. The other port is sent to a splitter to connect the TV boxes.

The modem/router supplies On Demand TV service, the cable guide and the internet service.
 
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Old 11-06-16, 06:03 AM
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When did you have Comcast last, Furd? I have them (now called Xfinity) and they're not backwards anymore. They've upped their internet speed and improved the TV service along with a new voice remote. I still have a landline so can't speak for Voip.
My son has FIOS (Verizon) and I don't see any differences.
 
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Old 11-06-16, 03:56 PM
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I can't honestly say when I dropped the Comcast Internet service, wait, yes I can as I have the file right next to me. It was near the end of November 2007. I had about a one week overlap when both services were active and I could do head-to-head comparisons.

Now it may be that Absurdity is better than it used to be, I don't know. I DO know they advertise a 100% fiber optic system and THAT is a lie. The "last mile" (may be more or less than a mile) between their distribution amplifiers and a residence is STILL via coaxial cable. They have NOT upgraded any coax to fiber all the way to the house of anyone I know using Comcast.

Comcast uses a slight subterfuge when they advertise their Internet speeds. They send the data in short, very high speed bursts with varying periods of no transmission interspersed with the data. It is the periods of no data flow that cause the problems, especially with any kind of streaming service. When used with VoIP there is a measurement called "quality of service" that very roughly takes into account these high speed data burst intermingled with the (relatively) long periods of inactivity. Q of S below about 70% results in choppy voice service and much below 50% simply doesn't work. I was consistently getting Q of S ratings of 35% or often so low as to be immeasurable with the Comcast service while at the same instant getting 96% to 98% with the Verizon connection.

Now for the majority of subscribers Comcast works just fine. Where the problems show up is when they have a large number of subscribers all having data intensive usage. Cable Internet works on a time-share basis and as such the more subscribers on any particular "loop" the slower the service. This can ONLY be alleviated with using a better mode of transmission (fiber optics) OR by adding additional "loops" and reducing the number of subscribers on any one loop.

As an example, consider a home with several Internet connections running at the same time. Perhaps an on-line gamer, someone watching a movie being streamed via Internet and a third person just "crusin' the 'net. At the same time there are two televisions each watching a different channel. At this point the data handling ability, the bandwidth, of the coaxial cable is being pushed to the maximum. [I use the term 'bandwidth' in its true sense here as data amount per unit of time rather than the more incorrect, but often used total data regardless of time]

Fiber optic data transmission is inherently better than coaxial cable and has a vastly higher bandwidth than does coax. Until Comcast brings the fiber to the house before changing the data transmission to what our computers and televisions use they will always be less than what a fiber system can provide.

A little story and I'll end this. My sister lives in a newer development, built in 2006. She was having so much trouble with Comcast Internet service that she changed to Frontier (Verizon sold most of their western holdings to Frontier a few years ago). It made such a difference for her that she, like I, would never go back to Comcast for Internet service.


As for the television service via Comcast, I have detailed my experiences in other posts on the subject. Suffice to say that I won't be going back to Comcast (or Absurdity) for TV service either.
 
 

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