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Old 10-26-02, 12:43 PM
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One-hundred-megabit connections through ordinary AC wall sockets within two years?

Quite possibly, if the HomePlug Powerline Alliance can meet its timetable.
HomePlug officials said Thursday that the consortium's members will begin crafting a next-generation specification, called HomePlug AV, designed to let homeowners network HDTV-quality video around their homes.

Two years may sound like a long time to develop a specification, but executives said the current 10-Mbit HomePlug specification required that long to develop. "It's not an insignificant undertaking," said Tom Reed, president of the alliance and a consultant with Cogency Semiconductors, a powerline networking semiconductor company. "Prior to finishing the specification we conduct field tests…other, standalone companies that develop a specification announce the spec, then test it in the field."

In April, ExtremeTech testers evaluated the first generation of powerline networking technology and found that it was extremely easy to set up, although performance lagged compared to wired Ethernet, and in certain instances specific outlets could cause problems. Wiring a home can distribute high bandwidth, but also slap homeowners with a few thousand dollars in cost, too.

"At this point we're getting close to a significant number of products that have been announced to move into the channel," Reed said. While most have been adapter-type products, Reed said powerline networking will move more aggressively into the camera space controlled by X10, which uses powerline networking for control purposes.

Reed said that an ideal HomePlug AV scenario would consist of a user storing a movie or high-definition television stream on a Personal Video Recorder, then decide to watch it from his or her bedroom, streaming it over the internal powerline network.

Of course, consumers will be far less tolerant of drops in the video or audio than a data packet or two. HomePlug 1.0 contains quality-of-service (QOS) standards which kick in if data rates drop to a megabit or 1.5 Mbits, where priority is assigned to audio and less to data traffic like Web surfing.

"For video, there will be a much higher level of QOS," Reed said. "It will be parameterized, almost guaranteed QOS. QOS really will be the most important piece of HomePlug AV."


source= http://www.extremetech.com/article2/...99TX1K0100486.

Brian
 
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Old 10-26-02, 06:57 PM
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Sounds rather fanciful. I can imagine what we will have to contend with if this comes to pass with interference from cheap cordless telephones and touch swithes on lamps. If RG6 is needed for good quality video feed now, how in the world will sending video over 14 guage unshielded wire be an improvement?
 
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Old 10-26-02, 11:36 PM
bigmike
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Cool Well...

It is already in test here in Springfield, but the one thing they have forgotten is loss. There is so much radiated RF from the lines that it’s actually causing blank spots for TV, FM and where we have really noticed it is in the two-meter ham bands. So if having a connection to them means my FM radio or ham equipment will not work right I will stick with cable, satellite links!
 
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Old 10-27-02, 06:02 AM
jmiddleton
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Sending data over the power lines isn't a new idea - my first exposure was the old BSR X10. Very few people bought into the idea back then and I doubt very many will buy in today. I personally believe the future is wireless. 802.11a already gives 54mbps which is more than enough for home use (including video) and the ipv6 protocols that make it practical to connect your TV, stereo and kitchen appliances have already been developed and are in the process of being deployed. The 802.11 wireless technology is very affordable and prices will continue to fall. 2 years from now, when this AC wireline technology becomes available its window of opportunity will already have passed.
 
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Old 10-28-02, 02:14 PM
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I prefer a fiber line over any wireless or power line. Any line that is dedicated for one task is usually faster then a line shared for multiple uses. I always push customer to get an Ethernet line if possible for thei networking. If at all not possible, then use wireless or power line.
 
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Old 10-28-02, 06:06 PM
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Didn't even think about that when I first read the story. The twist prevents the cross-talk, there is no twist in elect wiring. Doesn't sound like much thought has gone into the idea, just the development portion.

Brian
 
 

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