Image Resolution

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  #1  
Old 01-11-03, 12:14 PM
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Image Resolution

I had some .jpg images prepared by the photo developement company that processes film at the local drug store.
How can I verify the resolution and color composition of the image?
 
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Old 01-11-03, 12:26 PM
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The size of the image indicates the degree of resolution. The color composition is likely a standard through the jpg compression algorithm.
 
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Old 01-12-03, 04:26 PM
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I understand what resolution and quantiy of colors would do to an image. I would like to be able to determine the resolution and color quanity of colors of some particular images that I have. Obviously the higher the resolution, the more comfortable I will feel having a large size print made from it.
 
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Old 01-13-03, 09:49 AM
kliot
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It should be easy to check the resolution through any photo editing program. As far as color quantity I'm not familiar with that term but remember that jpg by it's nature compresses by loosing quality. If you are looking to do quality printing don't let the processing company save your files as jpg's they should save them as tif's or some other non compressed format.
 
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Old 01-21-03, 05:36 AM
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kliot,

I don't believe you can 'upgrade' quality of a pic. If you want a tiff file, you have to take a tiff pic with the camera. (You can save a jpg as a tiff, but it's still an inferior jpg - only 72 dpi)

Ron,
Take your jpg's(or preferably (.tiff's) to a regular photo store and talk to them. They'll process your pics with better results. A color laser printer will give you much better output.

fred
 
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Old 01-21-03, 09:39 AM
kliot
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Fewalt,

You are correct you can not 'upgrade' the quality of a pic, once the damage is done it's done. I was unclear as to whether the lab was scanning pictures or was being given jpg files to print. Most digital cameras have a tif or raw setting that will give better quality than lossy jpg setting.
 
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