2-4-1-?

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Old 02-09-03, 05:31 PM
execelon1
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2-4-1-?

hi to all and thanks for the help on the sound issue, the card was bad, replaced it and all is well. thanks again.. here's the deal on the 2-4-1. what i want to do is try to run 2 pc's on one cable connection. so far i have a webstar and a 4 position hub, ethernet cable from webstar cable modem to hub and 2 cables from it, one to pc 1 and one pc 2. this is the problem i'm having . only one works at a time. it's a first come,first serve basis. if #1 goes on first #2 can't and viasa/versa . any way to make this work without having to pay again for another service/connection ? thanks EX...
 
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Old 02-09-03, 05:41 PM
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Unless you are going to run the second computer behind the first with internet connection sharing, you will need a router instead of a hub. The router performs the login to the cable system via the cable modem and receives the assigned address. The computers connected to the hub in the router or behind the router share the connection from there.

cable
|
cable modem
|
router
|
(hub, if none in router)
| | | .....
computers

Hope this helps.
 
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Old 02-09-03, 06:16 PM
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You didnt say what operating systems you were using, but you might look here and follow the steps and see if it helps.
http://www.lpt.com/windowsnetworking/regusers/guide.htm
I used a hub and had 3 computers networked and all could access the internet at the same time. just remember that a hub is only one way(only allows traffic to go one direction at a time) whereas a switch allows traffic both ways simultaneously, making a switch much faster.not sure if routers do this or not. Anyway, i am sure its a simple configuration problem. let us know how it goes, and if it wont work we can get more specific. I have a couple ideas, but will wait to see.
 
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Old 02-10-03, 11:42 PM
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I think Chris is right here. You need a router. As Chris mentioned, the router obtains your IP from the ISP, then assigns IP's to each computer connected to it, without this you are just obtaining one IP to whichever computer gets to it first.

If you only have 2 computers, you could also setup a proxy. Connect the modem to 1 computer (with 2 network cards in it) then connect the other computer to that computer and use ICS to get connected to the internet.

Good luck!
 
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Old 02-11-03, 01:07 PM
MichaelJP
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Actually, you can run both computers off a hub.

You need to have a hub that has an uplink. Check you hubs docs and the hub. It may have a button that says something like,
"Normal/Uplink". If so then push it in to use the uplink and connect your cable modem's network plug to it.

Now you need to get to each computer's Network Neighborhood properties then into the network card's TCP/IP settings, the one for the network card not the others.

Click the IP Address tab and choose, "Specify an IP address" and put in a network address such as, 192.0.0.1.
In the other system put 192.0.0.2.

They can use a submask 255.255.255.0

This may work, it may not. Mainly I just wanted to point out you can hook two systems up using a hub.

Also make sure their on the same network workgroup.
 
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Old 02-11-03, 01:31 PM
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I've never seen any cable modem connection work only one IP address using just a hub. Each machine has to have an individual IP address, and only a DHCP server will assign that (in most cases). The 192 address will be ignored by the cable end host computer. That's an internal network IP address. There are 2 ways of doing it. Most cable companies will allow you to "buy" 1 additional IP address. That way each computer will simply get a different IP address from the cable host-computer. If not, then you'll need a router (I prefer the Linksys 4-port router). In most cases you'll need to duplicate all of the info on the computer in the router's setup-screen, but you may not have to do anything. Sometimes it's just plug and play. Basically, the ethernet line from the cable modem will go into the WAN port of the router, and each computer will connect to the LAN ports. After the modem, router and computers are all rebooted everything should work. If not, time to fire up IE on one machine and try to go to 192.168.1.1 . If you can get there, look on the status page and see if you have an IP address. If yes, you're in business. If not, come here again. I don't believe you'll have to though.
 
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Old 02-11-03, 01:43 PM
MichaelJP
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Well I agree a router is best.

It can be done I have it setup that way, Im on DSL, but I don't see any diference in what that would do after the modem box.


***
Just remembered, most Cable internet providers only give out one IP. Thought would be why you can only get one system on at a time. My DSL uses dynamic IP addresses so I don't have that problem.

Sorry
***
 
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Old 02-11-03, 03:12 PM
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I have a feeling we're not seeing the whole picture with Michael's setup. Not to say you're misleading us or anything, but as trinitro mentioned, 192.168.*.* addresses are internal addresses, an ISP will not recognize these addresses as valid. You have to have at least one address that is assigned dynamically by the ISP's DHCP, through the modem (I know, this doesn't necessarily apply to static addresses, but for this discussion, you have to have a DHCP assigned address.)

A true hub will not have a network address, if it does, it's a router, plain and simple. I think Michael may have a router and not realize it. Routers will assign (or use) internal addresses to connected computers. Michael, try typing 192.168.1.1 in your browser, I'll bet you get a router setup page. I may be wrong, but that's my guess. You may also have a special type of modem that acts as a router too, which could connect to the UPLINK port on a hub (which, btw, is only for interconnecting routers/hubs/etc., not computers or modems, in most cases.) While we're on the topic, what kind of modem do you have (make/model)?

Again, please take no offense to this post, just pointing out a few facts.
 
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Old 02-11-03, 03:32 PM
MichaelJP
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Not offended at all.

But I know the difference between a router and a hub.
Or I better, since my customers would get a little upset if I didnt

I have my network setup over a hub with an uplink to my DSL hub. I even contact my provider and they knew it would work.

High speed internet, and really all internet, are nothing more than a network.
They of course get a dynamic IP from the ISP.
When they log in, the ISP gives each system an IP number.

Of course what I wasn't thinking of was the fact that we were talking about a cable provider, they usually will only allow 1 IP, unless you pay for more. I would go with a router in that case since it would save money and protect the local network.
 
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Old 02-11-03, 06:49 PM
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Before you read the following, just let me say that i have 3 computers connected to internet using only a switch. All 3 puters go to switch. and cable modem goes to switch. All are able to access internet at same time. Before the switch, i just had a hub, same thing.ANY computer can be off or on at any time.Connection is straight through.No ics and no router.Hmmmm.....
From linksys support page:
Q U E S T I O N

I've purchased a Hub/Switch to share my broadband internet access, however, only one computer can get on to the internet, What can I do?

A N S W E R

A Hub/Switch by itself can not share Broadband Internet access. However you have 3 options:
1. Purchase a BEFSR11. The BEFSR11 is a 1 port router, which will connect to your broadband modem and to your hub or switch. The BEFSR11 offers an integrated NAT Firewall that will help protect your computer against unauthorized access as well as allowing more then one computer to connect to your broadband internet service simultaneously.
2. Call your ISP and purchase an additional IP address for your other computers. This option will normally cost you more money per month (usually between 5 and 15 dollars). Additionally, it does not offer a firewall.
3. Setup ICS (Internet Connection Sharing) which is built into Windows 98 SE, Windows NT, Windows ME, Windows 2000, and Windows XP. If you only have Windows 95 or Windows 98 (the first version of Windows 98 does not support ICS), you'll have to use third party software such as Sygate, Wingate, etc. This option will require that you have two Network cards in your computer and that computer needs to be on when ever the other computers wish to have internet access. The first two options do not require a PC on the network to be on all of the time.

Author:
Copyright 2002 The Linksys Group, Inc.
 
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Old 02-11-03, 07:13 PM
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multiple connection via switch

tae,

Each of your computers must be getting its own IP address from the cable DHCP server. Otherwise, the packets would not get to the right computer without some way to route them.

In the case of the original post, he is receiving an IP address. Only a single address awarded to the machine that connects to the server first. In the case of a single IP address, there must be some way of masquerading the other machines to share the connection.

Generally, this is done by some variation of Network Address Translation. That way the machines are tracked by the router to handle the packets to and from the internet. The ISP server does not know the difference, because it still handles only the original address.
 
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Old 02-11-03, 07:25 PM
MichaelJP
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Hmmm
Well I am setup with 2 systems on a hub with the uplink to a DSL modem. Both systems have unique IP addresses on the net when they connect.

When I hooked this up I called my DSL ISP to be sure it was ok and I wouldn't be charged extra.
They said while it was better to use a router that would provide internal addresses, that it would be fine unless the ISP started running out of IP addresses then one computer may lose it's connection.
 
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Old 02-14-03, 03:04 PM
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Exactly, you are getting 2 IP's from the ISP. As for excelon, his ISP will only allow 1 IP (as most ISP's work.) In tae's case, I would imagine the same thing is happening.

Check the IP of each computer connected, they will all be ISP assigned IP's (not 192.168, 127, etc.)

As Michael said, this works for the most part, but when hardware and software are upgraded at the ISP, you will probably lose the ability to get 2 or more IP's from the ISP without being charged for it.
 
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Old 02-15-03, 02:48 PM
MichaelJP
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Just wanted to clear up some points.

In my second post I mentioned I forgot we were talking of cable connection and it would probably allow only 1 IP.

I don't think Ill lose my ability, since my ISP, earthlink, uses dynamic IP addresses and they know and allow this.
 
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Old 02-15-03, 06:34 PM
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Michael, dynamic IP has nothing to do with it. Most cable (and DSL) providers use dynamic IP addressing using DHCP (unless you specifically ask for a Static IP, in which case they usually add a few bucks to your bill.) It really has to do with how many subscribers your ISP can handle and whether or not they are willing to allow more than 1 IP to each subscriber. Since they are using the MAC address assigned to your modem, they can limit each subscriber to only 1 IP address if that's what they want to do. Like I say, it really depends on the software used and how they have the DHCP server setup.

I know Earthlink is a pretty large ISP, I would imagine it just has more to do with the area you're in. They probably just don't have enough subscribers in that area (hence, on your server) to worry about IP addressing right now. I wouldn't count on keeping it that way forever, though. With the growing popularity of Broadband access, many ISP's are experiencing more growth than they can handle right now. I would be more worried about network drops and slow-downs for now. As the ISP grows, they will have to expand, which usually means downtime. If they don't expand their capacity fast enough, you get too many subscribers on one server and in turn get network slow-downs.
 
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Old 02-16-03, 01:34 PM
MichaelJP
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Sorry, when I say dynamic IP I mean there is more IPs available to me that just one at a time. I was not clear in what I was saying sorry.
 
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