DSL/Broadband

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Old 03-18-03, 02:44 PM
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DSL/Broadband

What is the difference between broadband and DSL? Is there a cost difference? Do you need additional hardware?...
 
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Old 03-18-03, 08:10 PM
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DSL is af form of broadband.
 
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Old 03-19-03, 12:42 AM
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Broadband is just a general term for high-speed internet. Many forms of connection fall under this category: cable, DSL, wireless, etc. Some would even consider Satellite broadband. There's no specification for what is or isn't broadband. That's one of the problems with the term. For instance, is ISDN (128kb) broadband? I wouldn't call it broadband, but some may.
 
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Old 03-19-03, 04:50 AM
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Broadband...

Then if its all the same in a general term...what is the difference in speed like my dial up is 50,600kb...then you said ISDN is 128,000kb, how fast is satellite? Why is it the modem is rated as a 14.4kb or the 28.8kb and then the 56??? Is there a different type of modem for cable, DSL, What speed is T-1?
 
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Old 03-19-03, 04:56 AM
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Meaning

What I meant was why is it the modem is rated by a selected speed, and DSL has no speed to compare it to. I would think the next generation modem would have been 112,000kb anyway...The one consolation I could see is that I wouldn't get cut off during a download... Also, are the dangers of someone hacking into your computer equal with a direct connection vs a dial-up?
 
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Old 03-19-03, 07:37 AM
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Wireless service vs. Satellite

"While both services transmit data without the use of wires, satellite access sends and receives data through satellites orbiting around the earth. Wireless Internet access uses a path of antennas between you and the Internet service provider. The two types of data are distinguishable by the kind of equipment that is used to translate them (a wireless receiver and a satellite dish and modem). "

go here http://www.ntlhome.com/ntl_internet/vs_broadband.asp#
and click on "Comparison Table"
From that site:
Downloading 32 MB
56KB/second modem 85 min 46 sec
Broadband at 128 kb/s 37 min 56 sec
Broadband at 60 kb/s 8 min 5 sec
Broadband at 1024 kb/s 4 min 44 sec

Right now, modem speeds are limited by law to 53 kb/s

from here:
http://www.umanitoba.ca/acn/remote/faq/speed56.html

"56K modems are asymmetrical in nature. When you connect to a 56K modem, you can only transmit upstream at a maximum speed of 33.6Kbps. The data can be transmitted to you at a maximum speed of 56Kbps. This means that downloads to you can be much faster, but uploads are no faster than V.34 modem connections.

There are many reasons why you may not be able to get a 56K connection. The first requirement for a connection greater than 33.6K is that the service provider side, or our side of the connection, has a digital phone link and digital modems. We have that. The end user needs a 56K modem. Even if those conditions are met, there can be other reasons why you cannot get a connection speed higher than 33.6Kbps. The reasons can include:

The FCC in the United States has a regulation that data speeds over telephone lines cannot exceed 53K. Until that law is changed the modems are artificially capped at that speed. |snip|"

Go here for T1
http://www.akornaccess.com/wireless/...ss_speeds.html

Technology Symetrical? Max Speed
ISDN...........Yes.............128 Kbps (2 channel)
ADSL...........No..............1400 Kbps (download)
T1...............Yes.............1500 Kbps

Each type of connection uses a different type (DSL, dialup, etc.) of modem, and within that there are different protocols and speeds.

"Always on" connections (DSL, cable) hacks can be pretty well thwarted by inserting a broadband router between the computer(s) and the modem (this won't work with most dial ups), and/or the use of software like Zone Alarm.
 
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Old 03-19-03, 08:50 AM
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Then if its all the same in a general term...what is the difference in speed like my dial up is 50,600kb
Broadband just refers to high-speed, pretty much anything over 56k is considered "high-speed" (I still don't consider ISDN high-speed, but that's because I use cable at almost 1mb.)

Broadband doesn't have a speed rating. It's just high-speed.

...then you said ISDN is 128,000kb, how fast is satellite?
Depends on the ISP and equipment used. Once you get into Broadband/High-Speed internet, speeds can get confusing. You have ADSL, SDSL, IDSL, then Cable uses different speeds. Basically it's like dial-up, except that now it depends on the ISP, not the modem the end-user is using. Usually you have different "packages" to choose from that offer different Upload/Download speeds. Everybody is different when it comes to these "packages" and it's all controlled by the ISP.

Why is it the modem is rated as a 14.4kb or the 28.8kb and then the 56???
That's just the way technology works. It's like CPU speeds, they just keep getting faster. Well, for a while, modems were doing the same things. Unfortunately (or maybe fortunately??) dial-up modems finally met their limits, 56k. So, along came Broadband.

Is there a different type of modem for cable, DSL,
Simply put, yes. It's usually external, similar to a network hub or switcher. Take a look at http://broadband.motorola.com/noflash/surfboard.html for some of the most widely used modems, the SurfBoard. Great modem, btw.

What speed is T-1?
As abnormal mentioned, it's around 1.5mb. T-1 is typically used commercially. The cost for installation and monthly service is too high for most residential customers.

What I meant was why is it the modem is rated by a selected speed, and DSL has no speed to compare it to. I would think the next generation modem would have been 112,000kb anyway
Yeah, you would think so wouldn't you? That's just technology for you.


...The one consolation I could see is that I wouldn't get cut off during a download...
Very true. If you go with a good ISP, one that has at least 99% uptime, you don't have to worry about cut-offs. Of course, like anything else, you still have some problems, but the technology has been around long enough to get most of the bugs worked out. And upgrades these days are few and far between.

Also, are the dangers of someone hacking into your computer equal with a direct connection vs a dial-up?
No, the dangers are higher, but only because the exposure is highter. Think about it this way, if you're in your car driving around 24/7, then your chances of being hit by someone else are much higher than if you just get in your car and drive to work, to the store, to pick up the kids, etc. But put in a decent firewall (whether hardware - built-in to router - or software - Zone Alarm, Black Ice, McAfee, etc.) and you protect yourself from the outside world. Hackers are really overrated anyway. Virus protection is much more important than a firewall. Virii these days don't destroy your computer, they get in to it and leave ports open and distribute your information. Without good AV software, a FW will do you no good.
 
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Old 03-21-03, 05:47 AM
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Thanks

Thanks so much for the replys...I'm kind of getting tired of waiting around with dial up, and ready to upgrade to something a little faster...without the cut-offs!
 
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Old 03-21-03, 01:21 PM
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in order to understand why dial up modems stopped at 56k, and never developed faster, you must understand how your telephone-telco works.

Quite simply, a single phone line like the one in your home is refered to as a ds0 in the telecom world. A ds0 is rated at 64kpbs. Because there is overhead (such as signaling packets, information etc) your phone line gets rated down to a 56k line, the other bits are used for signaling and data for the phone company switches, etc--kinda difficult to explain in 3 sentences.

For that reason, it is impossible to develop say a 100k dial up modem-the bandwidth simply does not exist--the max that the phone line can handle is rated at 56k by the phone companies.

The reason why dsl can achieve higher speeds over the same phone line, is because it uses a different frequency than voice does. You see, your dial up 56k modem dials up over the same frequency that your voice travels on on the telephone line 3-3000 htz if I remember right. This is why you can't talk on the phone and be on the internet at the same time.

The voice frequency is rated for voice and was never designed for data. There are frequencys attainable above 3000 htz on your telephone line that is unused by the voice frequency. DSL uses the portion of the telephone line that your voice does not travel on. The frequency is too high to carry voice, but with the right equipment is perfect to handle data. This is why you can be on the phone at the same time and use the net with dsl--because you are using to different frequency's within one phone line.

The term broadband therefore refers to pretty much anything beyond the 56k dialup.

don't be quick to criticize isdn. You guys are all thinking of the 2b+d rate---128k. ISDN is still the industry standard for digital communications. I work for a major long distance provider, and the standard for digital communications is ISDN at the primary rate, meaning a t1 isdn 0r isdn at 1.544 megabits, which is substantially faster than the 128kb rate.
 
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Old 03-21-03, 03:14 PM
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Yes, but that is commercial ISDN lines. Typically ISDN is 128k at the residential level (which is what we are discussing here.)

Besides, no one was criticizing it, I just said I don't consider 128k ISDN broadband, or high-speed. As I said, the term Broadband does not specifically refer to any certain speeds. So technically I could say I don't consider DSL or Cable Broadband, only T-1 or T-3 connections. But that's just an example.
 
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Old 03-21-03, 03:24 PM
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I guess I was a little unclear on that---

when I went to school, they used to rag on isdn, and say how it was on the way out. then I got a job and found how untrue that is--on the t1 level

I agree, the 128 isdn can barely be considered broadband.

I use my sprint pcs phone and usb cable as an isp to my home desktop computer. It hooks up consistently at 115+k speeds should I consider it broadband?? the lines are a little blurred
 
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Old 03-22-03, 06:56 PM
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Broadband

Well I tried to see if I could get broadband and with the phone number I guess they can tell if you are able to get broadband....I think this is why my neighbor got a sattelite dish, but he runs a business from his...I'll have to wait I guess... my neighbor said they stopped at the begining of my street...Great!.......
 
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Old 03-22-03, 07:03 PM
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Check on Cable, Wireless, and Satellite in you area too. Just because DSL is not available doesn't mean you are out of options.

Also go to www.dslreports.com to see if maybe another company offers some sort of IDSL or other "slower" DSL line (still better than 56k dial-up.)

Good luck!
 

Last edited by SafeWatch; 03-23-03 at 11:17 AM.
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Old 03-22-03, 08:35 PM
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Cable???

By cable do you mean Cable TV cable??? We have that here by Cablevision....I'm looking to pay no more than about $50.00 a month for something faster....I don't think wireless would fall into that group??? I think satellite is up around $90.00 or so....??
 
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Old 03-22-03, 08:48 PM
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Yes, Cable TV company provides Cable Internet service. I pay $75 a month for Internet/Digital Cable/some Premium Channels. Cable Internet is around $40-50, and usually they will install for a low to nothing price.
 
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Old 03-22-03, 09:32 PM
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OK

I'll check into it!
 
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Old 03-23-03, 06:19 AM
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hvac get your facts straight man. Satelite is fast on the download, but limited to 56k on the upload. Unless you have your own means of transmitting (which is way to expensive for the average home owner). Also DSL is rated for service levels. The level of service though will depend on the distance from your connection to the modem and the connection to the phone company central office. (Not over 18,000 feet) there can be no coils or taps in place. Dsl can go up to 7.5 meg for business with a miniram on site, but usually runs at 700 down/150 up. Cable is the way to go though. Very little interuptions, faster connection. 2meg all the time. At least through Comcast.
 
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Old 03-23-03, 06:42 AM
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Comcast?

What does Comcast charge monthly? It sounds like your implying that its one speed??? Isn't it like DSL?... 60K is their cheapest, then 128, 600, 1024..depending what your willing to pay???
 
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Old 03-23-03, 11:26 AM
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Yes, that's true. JJ0072 makes a good point about Satellite. Another reason it's not recommended. However, if it's the only thing available, it's much better than 56k up and down. Here's the thing, most homeowners get online to check e-mail, do some surfing, download some software, etc. None of this requires much upload. The typical homeowner simply doesn't use much upload bandwidth. So, upload speeds are usually not a factor. On the other hand, if you run a webserver from your home (or anywhere, for that matter) and you are constantly FTP'ing files back and forth, uploading and downloading constantly, this could be a huge factor in deciding who to use.

Keep in mind that the typical DSL/Cable connections also have slower upload speeds than the advertised download speed (it's not 56k in most cases, but usually not much more than 312k or so.) Again, this is RESIDENTIAL DSL/Cable, not commercial lines.

And, yes, Hvac, most companies do have different "levels" of service you can choose. The reason is simple, your ISP pays for bandwidth just like you do. The more you use, the more they have to charge.
 
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Old 03-23-03, 02:38 PM
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Talking OK!!!

Thanks to all for your insight...It's just I hate buying something and learn later the pro's and Con's ....
 
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Old 03-24-03, 03:33 PM
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Hvac, Safewatch is correct. The faster the connection you want the more money you will pay. Also not everthing is availible everywhere. Even satelites have there limits. (tree line, horizon clearance, etc...)
 
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Old 03-26-03, 08:34 PM
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Oh yah!!!

Well I found out the other day the cable company only provides television cable signal here....A local ISP in my city can't offer even DSL to my house he said because I'm too far from a switching station (telephone)...I guess I'll just have to wait till the stage coach pulls in, to find out when they're going to get with it!...
Thanks again I'll just have to be patient, I guess...
 
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