Networking question

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Old 11-15-03, 09:55 AM
sir_jeffrence
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Question Networking question

I recently got a wireless router so I could share my cable connection with my laptop. I hooked the router up, from cable modem to WAN port, then from LAN port to NIC on desktop, turned on router, then modem, but the LAN light doesn't stay on. It lights up and flashes real fast, which it is supposed to do, but it goes off then back on. When I get the computer booted up, the system tray has message saying the network cable is unplugged. It comes and goes like it is plugged in then unplugged. I cannot even bring up the configuration menu. I thought that it was the router so I took it back and got another one but same problem. It is a Gateway WBR-100. Its not the cable or the port so that leaves the cable modem or NIC. Problem is the cable moden and NIC work just fine by itself. NIC is built in and cable modem is a RCA, computer is running XP Home with Zone Alarm and Norton AntiVirus. Tried disabling them to no avail. Is it possible the modem or NIC is not stable enough for a router connection? Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks
 
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Old 11-15-03, 10:04 AM
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Have you tried connecting the computer to the router, but leaving the cable modem unplugged?

Also I am question what you say about the LAN light. How many hardwired LAN connections does this router have? There should be a LAN light for each hardwired connection, and the light should be solid except when data is actually being transmitted. With only a single computer hooked up the collision light should not be flashing either.

One other question, do you live in an apratment or a house? Are there other houses nearby? Is there a way on the router to disable the wireless ports? You may want to try doing that, if you can.
 
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Old 11-15-03, 10:17 AM
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Was the NIC installed by your cable company?
Have you changed the NIC to use DHCP (it should be doing this anyway, but it may have been changed.)?

You probably won't be able to disallow wireless connections until you can get into the configuration - most routers are Web configurable only.

Have you tried resetting the router and cable modem with the RESET button - sometimes this is required to have the cable modem recognize the new MAC address. But, you should still be able to get into configuration - you have a problem between the NIC and Router right now - have you run the WinXP Network Wizard on the NIC? That may resolve some issues between the 2.

Give that a try and let us know how it goes.
 
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Old 11-15-03, 10:20 AM
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I tried it without the cable modem hooked to it and still the same. I live in a house and yes a neighbor is near (bout 20 feet from the wall i'm on) but they don't have a computer network. Also I thought of the cordless phone, but I believe theirs is 900 Mhz. My phone is 2.4 Ghz but I unplugged it. I cannot see anyway to disable the wireless port on the router unless I unscrew the antenna but I doubt thats gonna disable it. I have 4 ports and tried all four to no avail. Thought it could be cable but a different one does not solve it. NIC is built in computer and is configured to set IP address automatically. The cable company never touched the NIC except to configure it to set IP address automatically.
 
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Old 11-15-03, 10:24 AM
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I also tried the reset. I turned everything off, unplugged everything, turned on router, let the power and wireless light turn on, plugged in cable modem, let all the lights get flashing, then plugged in computer then booted up. Also it does this before I even turn on the computer. One time I was able to bring up the configuration menu but then it unplugged on me.
 
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Old 11-15-03, 10:34 AM
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Did you try the Network Wizard? I think you have to run it from Network Neighborhood, but I'm not sure. Haven't used XP Home, so it may be different than XP Pro. You should be able to go to Help & Support and run the wizard from there, if it's not in NN.
 
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Old 11-15-03, 10:56 AM
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Its in My Network Places and I tried that. It says that the network is unplugged and before I can go on, I need to plug it in. Well it is plugged in but same problem. I can ping 127.0.01 just fine but when I try to ping the router 192.168.1.1 it is "host unreachable" Device Manager is not showing any conflicts. I just cannot figure it out. Maybe I should try a new NIC card?
 
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Old 11-15-03, 11:07 AM
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Try setting your NIC card to address 192.168.1.2 (or any last number between 2 and 254) - that will force the NIC onto the same sub-net as the router. Then try pinging again and configuration again. Restart after you change it, just for good measure.
 
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Old 11-15-03, 11:39 AM
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OK I tried changing IP address in Alternate Configuration but that didn't work. I also changed in in the General tab but nope. When I have the computer off and the router and modem on, the collision light is flashing like crazy on the LAN light before going off then back on. When I changed the IP address, I could ping the loopback address but when I tried 192.168.1.2, I got "host unreachable"
 
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Old 11-15-03, 11:50 AM
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Check to make sure that both network cables are wired alike, not a mix of 568A and B or one a crossover cable.
 
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Old 11-15-03, 11:54 AM
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Both cables are Cat 5 568A but the one that came with the router has 8 wires while the one that is plugged in the modem has 4 wires. I should've brought that up since I was wondering originally if that could be a problem.
 
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Old 11-15-03, 11:58 AM
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Pinging the loopback address, 127.0.0.1, means only that the network card is working properly.

However, there is a clue to a problem in your statement that you cannot ping 192.168.1.2 when you think your network card is properly set to that address. You should be able to ping your own address.

Make sure that your network card is set to 192.168.1.2 (if in fact your router uses the 192.168.1.x subnet). Make sure that your gateway address is set to 192.168.1.1.

If however, your router uses an IP address other than 192.168.1.1, then make sure that you use whatever subnet it is using. (In other words, if it is using 192.168.0.1, then youn need to use an IP address in the range 192.168.0.x subnet, such as 192.168.0.2.

Since you say that everything works when you connected directly to the cable modem, then use that Ethernet cable between the computer and the router. All your cables need to be 8 wires, four twisted pairs. Also make sure that your computer is not connected into an uplink port on the router.
 
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Old 11-15-03, 12:03 PM
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Here's how I configured the card

IP address: 192.168.1.2
Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
default gateway: 192.168.1.1

The address for the router is 192.168.1.1 and I still could not ping 192.168.1.2. You say that both cables need 8 wires so I'm gonna get another 8 wire 568A cable. It needs to be a straight through not a crossover right?
 
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Old 11-15-03, 12:08 PM
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Yes, you need straight through cables.
 
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Old 11-15-03, 12:10 PM
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Although you could get by with 4 conductors on pins 1,2,3,6; I would ditch the substandard cable for a standard Cat5 patch cord.
 
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Old 11-15-03, 12:15 PM
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Ok I'm off to get the cable. I'll keep you posted on the results. Thanks all!
 
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Old 11-15-03, 12:21 PM
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I still quaestion whether you have your network settings configures properly.

Go to a command prompt and run the program route with the print option, as in "route ptint". Tell me exactly what it says for active routes, and for default gateway.

Also run the program ipconfig from the command prompt ("ipconfig") and let me know what that program says.
 
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Old 11-15-03, 07:29 PM
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Another thing is that when you change your IP to 192.168.1.2, you should not be pinging that address - essentially that is the same as pinging 127.0.0.1 - the localhost address. You shoud be pinging 192.168.1.1 - the router address. This is the address you're trying to reach. Then, when you finally get that working, you can ping the ISP address, which will show up in the router configuration - but, by this point, it will probably be unnecessary as everything will probably be working.

Try a new cable - and I would still try running the Network Wizard to see if it will setup everything for you. You should have no problem if you can get it to run.
 
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Old 11-15-03, 07:49 PM
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Okay you have a wireless router ... forgive me for being so simplistic but doesn't the NIC have to be wireless to talk to the router? Isn't that the whole purpose of going wireless ... no cables? What's the purpose of a wireless router if you have to cable to it? Higher cost is my mway of looking at it.

Just my thoughts.
 
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Old 11-15-03, 08:46 PM
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Good page on cable modem troubleshooting, and includes setting up zone alarm.
http://homepage.ntlworld.com/robin.d.../security.html

it seems that zone alarm and win xp sometimes have a problem. that might be worth checking into if the cable doesn't do it. I know i have had trouble with it before, but alot of people are trouble free. Sometimes disabling it isn't enough. You might try uninstalling it altogether if need be. Hope it's just the cable.
 
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Old 11-15-03, 09:36 PM
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Usually the cable between the DSL/Cable modem and the PC is crossover. The cable between the PC and the router is straight through. Some routers can autoconfigure themselves, but most don't. If the lights don't come on you have no connection (both the lights on the back of the PC (if you have one) and the router).

Set everything to DHCP. Remove any entries in the networking setup (Gateway, DNS, etc). Let DHCP take care of everything.

Disable any firewalls, then shut everything off. First restart the modem, and let it link up with the cable/DSL end. Next restart the router, and allow it to fully boot. The PC light on the modem should come on, along with the WAN light on the router.
Next restart the PC. When you get to the desktop click on start, run, then Winipcfg (if WinXP right click on networks, then connections, click on your connection, then click on the little checkbox that says "Show icon...". An icon should appear in the taskbar (right side). Right clikc on it, then status, then support. You should have a 192.168.x.x IP address there.
 
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Old 11-15-03, 10:06 PM
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Okay you have a wireless router ... forgive me for being so simplistic but doesn't the NIC have to be wireless to talk to the router? Isn't that the whole purpose of going wireless ... no cables? What's the purpose of a wireless router if you have to cable to it? Higher cost is my mway of looking at it.
Not necessarily. Most wireless routers also have hardwire ports in addition to the wireless access points. This allows you to combine a simple hardwire network with wireless access. I actually have 2 4-port routers, one supports wireless also - so 8 hardwire ports and the wireless access points. For close-by computers, this is a good setup - most computers have a hardwire NIC already installed - if not, it's easy to add one for about $20. On the other hand, if you <i>had</i> to have wireless NIC's, you're looking at $40-80 each. That can get expensive.

As for the problem, I think Tae has a good idea - completely remove Zone Alarm. First of all, it's not really necessary - the router has a built-in firewall. Secondly, it could be hindering more than helping. Try it and see what happens. At least it removes one more factor from the equation.

Good luck!
 
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Old 11-16-03, 07:02 AM
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Trinitro, you are incorrect. Every router I have ever seen designed for connecting to cable or DSL modems connects with a straight through router to the cable modem. This is done for a reason.

The manufacturers want to eliminate, as much as possible, connection problems. They don't want users to have to worry about which type of cable they have. For this reason, the cable and DSL modems connect to a NIC with a straight through cable. Expanding on this, the manufacturers of the routers design their routers so that the LAN port connects with (or at least defaults to looking for) a straight through cable to the modem.

Unless a home user is looking to use multiple routers, he or she doesn;t evebn need to know what a crossover cable is. And with most modern switched and hubs being auto-sensing, the need to understand the difference is almost entirely eliminated.
 
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Old 11-16-03, 07:50 AM
sir_jeffrence
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Ok here's the update. I went and bought two patch cables and a NIC just in case. The two cables did not do it but when I installed the new card....bingo it worked! I remember a while back before I got the router, I kept having to restart my modem because I couldn't get online. I thought the modem was going bad but then all the sudden the problem went away. Its been about a month since I was having that problem. I wonder if the on board NIC was just stable enough for just the modem but not the router? I've never heard of this happening. Wouldn't you think that if the NIC was bac that it wouldn't work with the modem? I went over my configuration over and over and knew it was all correct. Thank you all for the help and if there are any suggestions on why this happened then I'm all ears.
 
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Old 11-16-03, 09:03 AM
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Odd that the NIC was bad.

Bottom line is that you have it working.
 
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