cable modem

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  #1  
Old 11-19-03, 02:14 PM
josh1
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cable modem

how long for dvd quality full length movie to transfer across basic cable modem? can encoding reduce file size significantly? ie mpeg4? if you could give me average time, worst case time and any ideas on how to speed up large video data transfers over cable lines?


Thanks-Josh
 
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Old 11-19-03, 03:03 PM
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You could go to movielink.com and test your connection to learn the very thing that you ask.

Data transfers are faster over cable when there are fewer users connected. Each user taps some of the limited bandwidth, slowing each other user a bit.

The last time I pulled a full-length movie over DSL, it took four hours. I have a connection cabapble of 150k, but the server was not so fast and robust. If the server is as fast as the connection, the connection is the limiting factor. On the internet, any bottleneck dictates the maximum speed available.

Hope this helps.
 
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Old 11-19-03, 03:48 PM
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I agree with what you just said. Ever used file sharing programs like, "Morphous" "LimeWire" "Napster"???

These all have the same options in them. And that is the ability to change how much of your bandwith is being used to allow others to download files off of your computer. What is so frustrating about that is when they have cable modem with plenty of bandwith, they only allow users to download at speeds of
2 to 4KBPS

That is the amount of a dialup modem! When I am online on file sharing programs, I allow people to download out of my maximum 350KBPS............50KBPS

Now thats what I call being curtious!

PS: Incase no one has ever noticed. At 2 to 4KBPS, it takes an hour to download a 10MB file. And a whole day or more to download a 100MB file! If your still using dialup, and you surf frequently, download files, and games, then you should switch to cable. Do not go with DSL. I not only hurd you have to be within your ISP control center for you to have DSL, but I have also hurd that people frequently get dissconnected once in a while just as if you were on dialup. ITs usually allways due to your ISP.
 
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Old 11-19-03, 04:40 PM
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I not only hurd you have to be within your ISP control center for you to have DSL
You must be within 18000 feet of the central office for there to be sufficient signal for DSL.

I have also hurd that people frequently get dissconnected once in a while just as if you were on dialup.
Odd how things get around.

they only allow users to download at speeds of 2 to 4 KBPS
This is similar to bittorrent except there are many servers running simultaneously so the receiving computer will see rates close to the maximum bandwidht available. But bittorrent is legal.
 
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Old 11-19-03, 07:39 PM
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Each DSL provider is different. I have never been inadvertently disconnected from my DSL connection, and my DSL connection is faster than the cable modem connection I used to have. I switched because DSL was faster and cheaper.
 
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Old 11-19-03, 09:04 PM
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im using 56K so movielink wont let me play. 350K seems small I thought cable could handle 1.5mbps?

how small can you compress a dvd movie in actual file size?(never checked a dvd file size?) Im sure compression results in some quality loss, but say how far could you compress the file and still get a decent cable TV style image quality? is a dvd closer to 7.66 gb? or usually smaller?

what file on the dvd disc is the actual "movie" so I can check its size? 7.66 is just whole disc+software junk etc

Thanks-Josh
 
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Old 11-19-03, 09:24 PM
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Well you do but, when many people on you get a average of 350KBPS. The only time you will ever get 1.2MBPS is when hardly anyone else is on the internet! Which never happens. The difference is that you will not get disconnected like you do with DSL.
 
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Old 11-19-03, 09:36 PM
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Even with Cable service, you won't get 1.2 or 1.5Mbps - unless you are signed-up for those speeds - which, of course, costs major bucks.

Cable and DSL signals are now regulated at the ISP for speed, so your modem won't go faster than your highest rated speed - read the fine print "up to" ---- speeds.

BTW, 350Kb is the Download speed, upload is usually no more than about 128K on cable or DSL - at least, residential service.
 
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Old 11-19-03, 11:48 PM
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ah, but what if im rolling my own WAN? (see other thread about cable networks) can I dictate my own transfer speeds? Im still limited to 1.5 max right? a direct connect between remote and the network should be faster than cable co internet limits, and in theory could i not keep it at 1.5 max, subject to line loss?

Thanks-Josh
 
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Old 11-20-03, 01:28 AM
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If I understand him corectly he is asking if there is a way or is it possible to have more than 350KBPS downloading speeds? If he is I would like an answer to that question weather or not that is his question. Thats my question too I guess. I will be starting this home network soon and just wondering what of download speeds I will get to the other computer.
 
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Old 11-20-03, 08:46 AM
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Just for grins, I downloaded a movie from movielink last night. 560 MB in 1 hour 7 minutes. Numerically, 139 k sustained. As a trial, I pulled a 700 MB file off of my file server. I got a sustained rate of 6 MB/sec (48Mbps) over a 100 Mbps Cat5 network. That is as fast as the drive on the server will run.

I have seen peak download speeds here of 400 kbps, but that is quite rare.

You can get faster download speed from faster connections.

T1 - 1.5 megabits per second
T2 - 6.3 megabits per second
T3 - 44.7 megabits per second
T4 - 274.1 megabits per scond
T5 - 400.3 megabits per second

A T1 line costs about $500 a month.

At 350 Kbps sustained, Terminator20 could download the same 560 MB movie in about 20 minutes.

For your home network, a switch will provide all the computers the same rate. Unless, you get a fast internet connection, the limiting factor will be the speed of the connection. A basic 10BaseT network running at 10 megabits per second is many times faster than the data from the internet. The speed of a home network is not important unless you are transferring large files across your network. After all, the drives can transfer data only so fast.

Hope this helps.
 
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Old 11-20-03, 08:51 AM
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8 bits in a byte. 100 Megabits per second rate is 12.5 megabytes per second.
 
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Old 11-20-03, 10:07 AM
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Yes, big difference in bytes vs bits. Most cable modems are 1.5 to 3 megaBITS (1500 to 3000 kbps) per second . Mine happens to be 3 Megabits and I can consistently download about 350 kiloBYTEs or 2800 kiloBITs.

1 byte = 8 bits


Maybe I'm just in a good neighborhood, but I never notice slowdowns on my downloads during "busy" times.
 
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Old 11-20-03, 03:10 PM
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While it is true that 8 bits equal a byte, this is true only in theory, not in practice.

For serial transmissions, such as over a regular dial-up modem, each byte will actually be ten or even eleven bits. This is because there are start bits, stop bits and possibly parity bits associated with each byte to be transmitted.

When using a dial up or serial connection, divide the baud rate (bits per second) by by ten to convert to bytes per second.

For TCP/IP connections it is even worse than that. All TCP/IP packets have overhead packets that are transmitted along with the data packets. Depending upon packet size, the overhead may be quite extensive. It is very difficult to actually take the size of a file and use the bits per second rate to try tio figure out how long it takes something to be transmitted.
 
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Old 11-20-03, 04:59 PM
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Actually, taking Chris' example - the math is very simple:

560Mb/139KBps/60secs = 67 minutes

Pretty much everything these days has the average KBps while downloading - and for that matter - it also has the average time left. Of course, you never know exactly what KBps you'll get due to the internet being an ever-changing array of servers that crash and overload, etc. But, for the most part, with some simple math, you can figure out how long something will take to download.
 
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Old 11-20-03, 05:45 PM
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While it is true that 8 bits equal a byte, this is true only in theory, not in practice
How true.
The difference between theory and practice, in theory, is less than the difference between theory and practice, in practice.
 
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