Turning computer on and off

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  #1  
Old 05-10-04, 04:30 PM
las
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Turning computer on and off

I think has far as windows goes It's not a bad Idea
to turn computer on and off when not In use just
to get the benifits of a reboot each time... so windows
can refresh It's world?
 
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  #2  
Old 05-10-04, 05:45 PM
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This is a question of great debate. Some think there's no need to turn them off. Some do. Personally, all of my machines run 24/7 (unless of course they fail).

As far as power consumption, computers use virtually none. All I do is shut off the monitors, and leave the computers running 24/7. I'll generally reboot Windows machines about once a month or so to clean 'em out a bit, but that's it. My linux and other unix machines stay on, period.

It's up to you completely. There's really no NEED to turn them off, but it really doesn't matter either way. It's a matter of personal preference. Other than the fact that I see no point in shutting them all off, I also run seti, which is another reason to leave them on.

Chris
 
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Old 05-10-04, 05:47 PM
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It should be pointed out that if you are running Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows My Enemy, that your PC should be rebooted daily. These three operating systems share a common bug which does not exist in Windows 200 or Windows XP related to the proper handling of resources. Over time, these three operating systems run out of resources memory area and run slower and slower.
 
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Old 05-10-04, 08:35 PM
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That's somewhat reasonable, Bob. I don't know about daily though. Windows isn't THAT bad, is it?!

Chris
 
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Old 05-10-04, 10:16 PM
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I run win98 and after about 8-10 hours of heavy use, it starts to not load websites, or partially load websites. Really bogs down. Quick reboot, and its all better. But if its only being used for light duty (checking email, etc. ) throughout the day, it will go at least 2 days before bogging down(never left it on longer than that). It probably doesnt help that the anti-virus, firewall, and seti are all running in the background using up resources.
 
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Old 05-11-04, 05:21 AM
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As pt_fixer said, it all depends on how heavily you use your Windows 9x or My Enemy PC. For many people, a daily reboot is easy enough to do. Just shut down before you go to bed and boot up the next day when you need to use it.
 
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Old 05-11-04, 06:50 AM
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The issue regarding some versions of windows (95 & 98) and many other operating systems like it, is resources and available resources. The more that is running in the background, the less there is available during usage.

RAM (Random Access Memory) plays a big roll in such. Adding more RAM helps matters greatly. As can increasing the amount of disk space allocated to such, within limits of course.

Such operating systems store everything done on the machine. Lots of cache is stored and maintained in some operating systems. Windows 95 & 98 are just two of them that cache lots of stuff. (To much, in my opinion)

Doing so makes web site etc used often appear quickly and the rest that is new, than loads up. That's the secret to being quick, based upon the technology used back than. And it works well.

Problem is, windows saves much too much while in both daily use and that which is stored. Add in programs that run in the background, etc, heavy use and the system loads up and begins to slow down as windows begins scrambling to find places to save stuff, when ram becomes scarce.

Thus, a reboot is wise, when the OS (Operating System) begins showing signs of slowing down. Adding more RAM helps dramatically but is not the only cure all. Nor is increasing the disk space allocated.

Windows, (older versions at least) in and of itself, does not do a great job of clearing out it's own cache either. Thus vendors sell software to do so for those whom do not know how to manually do so.

Nor should a user do so, unless they know exactly what to do and not do. Thus, the places windows stores stuff in the "C" drive is not as easily accessable to the average user nor should it be.

Windows software writers knew some would look in places they should not be. If the user does find the folders in the OS they should not be in, the writers used a very effective method to deter us.

They simply coded the folders so they would not be understood what they are for.... Brilliant method that works. Average person whom finds a folder(s) coded as such and cannot ID it's meaning, is very likely to past it over.

If that fails to deter, a popup should appear with a warning note. Brilliant idea and very effective method used. A HUGE CAUTION sign...

As a result of all this and much more, turning off the machine daily is a wise idea. Doing so allows the OS to clear it's RAm and start fresh. Or at least attempt to. Not always possible as a result of windows own OS and all the programs we add and or allow to run in the background, etc.

A reboot helps, while a full shut down does a better job of refreashing the OS. More RAM is a wise investment, to a cetain point. As well as other methods. Best bet and least expensive way to prevent slow downs and avoid freeze ups and or crashes....reboot and or turning the system off.

Running the system tools at least once monthly and in the correct order, helps plenty. Doing so, windows will automatically bring to the front cache those programs etc used most often and do so in the proper order we use them. Now that, in my opinion, is yet another brilliant method.

Learning from experience is a good teacher.
Learning from the pros, is a huge benefit too.
I have had the fortune to have both.

My "Dimes" worth.....

Good Luck
Sharp Advice
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  #8  
Old 05-17-04, 06:02 PM
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Watch out for Lightning

Hi Guys, I spent 31 years chasing lightning strikes working for BellSouth, and unless you have a PC power backup with lightning surge protection on the PC and using a dialup telephone line with a very good surge protection, I would at least unplug the POTS Line, I have seen Houses and Business Offices computer systems fried because the POTS modem was still plugged into the phone jack. Thousands and thousands of times I visited these places after a lightning storm and advised these customers that even through you have a good surge protection on your computer, and or even if you turn off your computer, there is -51 volt live wire that sometimes acts like a lightning rod straight into you computer. That little phone wire can carry a lightning bolt right into the back of you computer. Inside your computer the voltage jumps all over the place.
My 2 cents.
 
  #9  
Old 05-17-04, 06:23 PM
las
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on and off

Yup I got my modem plugged Into the same receptacle
so It gets shut off when I turn my computer and monitor off
I can shut off a second receptacle thats what turns the modem off
So when I shut things down I can work It so the modem stays on
or I can also shut the modem down...I have choosen to shut the modem
down also...I often thought about that...what If there was a surge of power even thou the computer Is turned off what about the modem and what about
the surge protector Itself,I would want to protect my surge protector from taking a unecessay hit...thats why I use two receptacles
 
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Old 05-17-04, 06:29 PM
las
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If modem Is turned off?

O.K. then If the modem Is turned off can the surge still go threw the phone
line and Into the computer
 
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Old 05-17-04, 06:50 PM
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I have a surge protector, but I dont really trust that against lightning. Anytime there is a thunderstorm, I unplug the surge protector and unplug the cable modem from the coaxial cable. I dont know if there is a possibility of the lightning running up the coax cable wire, but if it does, I doubt its going to stop at the modem, even if its unplugged from the wall. If lightning can jump from earth to cloud, hows my cable modem gonna stop that. I think that would apply to your telephone line as well, las. Someone correct me if I am wrong.
 
  #12  
Old 05-17-04, 07:28 PM
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Lightning Power grid

30 or 40 years ago each if the utilites was grounded separately. Each bonded to a earth ground somewhere in your house. If your neighbors house was hit by lightning the house might burn to the ground and your house may not even get a surge, only the building hit by lightning got the full strike. For the last 30 years or so all utilities must bond to the power company's ground. Telephone cable, and Cable TV, must be bonded to your power utilies ground. That forms a GRID. The benefit is the GRID draws down the voltage from a lightning strike so no single building takes the full charge, BUT the problem with the GRID is that every building for miles in all directions gets a surge each time lightning strikes.
Today, if your neighbors house gets hit by lightning, your house and every neighbors house get a big surge. The surge travels to every bonded ground. the surge jumps from the power lines to the Cable TV, to the Telephone lines and back. Inside your home, every AC unit, stove, TV, Frig, Microwave, and Computer get a surge, it's spread out so most of the time the surge protectors everywhere ground out the lightning, BUT depending on how close you are to the actual Lightning HIT, depends on how much you voltage get.
Many times the lightning will blow apart the Telephone Protector outside your home, to save your house from a surge. Thousand of times I went on a repair call and the people would fuss at me and Bellsouth because the telephone was dead, they changed their minds when I would tell the the phone went dead to save their home.
My 2 cents
 
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Old 05-18-04, 04:41 AM
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I always thought that the lightning went to ground through the ground system, not to everybody's house.

If 1,000,000 volts of lightning at 200,000 amps from a typical strike were spread out through the neighborhood, it would seem that everything in the area would be fried. Especially, if the surge were coming through the unfused ground system.

It has been my experience that lightning can enter on any conductor: electrical wiring, telephone, cable, and so on. The cable folks will tell you that the cable is grounded, but only the braid is grounded. The center conductor can carry a significant induced charge.

A surge protector will protect from a power surge which is what happens when a large appliance switches or the electric power comes on after an outage. A direct hit from lightning will incinerate the surge protectors along with anything else in its path. The grounding system on your house will go a long way to protecting it from lightning and protect you from an unsafe electrical system. A lightning strike on your service drop will still do significant damage. The best protection for a direct hit would be a MOV system on the service entrance.

Here is a good description of how a surge protector works, for all those who would like to know: http://computer.howstuffworks.com/surge-protector.htm

The best protection for a computer in an electrical storm would be to disconnect all wiring that leads to it.

Hope this helps.
 
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Old 05-18-04, 05:00 AM
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Originally Posted by las
O.K. then If the modem Is turned off can the surge still go threw the phone
line and Into the computer
Yes, the surge can go right through the phone line.
 
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Old 05-18-04, 07:50 PM
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I live in Darwin in the Northern Territory of Australia. During our Wet Season, we have the highest rate of lightning strike in the world. As I also work in the IT field, I have some experience with lightning.

The quoted link http://computer.howstuffworks.com/surge-protector.htm
contains the following:

"When lightning strikes near a power line, whether it's underground, in a building or running along poles, the electrical energy can boost electrical pressure by millions of volts. This causes an extremely large power surge that will overpower almost any surge protector. In a lightning storm, you should never rely on your surge protector to save your computer. The best protection is to unplug your computer."

I think this is the important point. A lightning strike, even one or two houses away, will just waltz on past your surge protection. Zap! Bang! Computer dead!

Even against not-so-close lightning strikes, depending on MOV based protection is pure folly. The reaction time of an MOV (ie the time it takes to detect a surge and change it's resistance) is measured in microseconds. Lightning induced surges - eg on a power line - can rise to the megavolt range in nanoseconds. So the strike has been, gone and destroyed your PC before the MOV even thinks about reacting. Forget MOV protection. They are ONLY good against low level surges.

Unplugging EVERYTHING is the ONLY way.
 
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Old 05-19-04, 06:48 AM
las
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I believe you

If a storm does approach I'll unplug everything
even the jack In the wall
 
  #17  
Old 05-19-04, 06:51 AM
las
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I guess I do not need a surge protector

Thanks a million for advice I think more people will
be turning there computers off more when not In use
or they'll monitor there situation better...I believe a surge In power will
get past the surge protector If It's lightening
 
  #18  
Old 05-19-04, 08:20 AM
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las,

Regardless of whether you unplug the machine or not during a storm, you still need a surge protector. They're so cheap, they certainly don't hurt.

Chris
 
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Old 05-19-04, 04:17 PM
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If you are really serious about protection, ie you absolutely MUST use your computer, even during a violent electrical storm, the ONLY solution is a true UPS with an isolation transformer. With a good quality surge suppressor on it's input side, this will protect the load from all but a direct hit. Even big Arnie can't protect you from that!

But of course we are talking thousands of $$. Please note I am not talking about the MANY toys on the market. They are only battery backup units.
 
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Old 05-19-04, 04:59 PM
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A surge protector protects against surges in the house current from switching large demand appliances, such as: air conditioners.

Here is some interesting material on lightning protection and MOV, gas tubes, and avalanche diodes:

http://www.arcelect.com/lightnin.htm
 
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