Cox High Speed Internet

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Old 01-26-05, 03:42 PM
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Cox High Speed Internet

I just got Cox High Speed Internet, which I hooked up myself and connected with an Installation disk. The kit came with the Modem, cable wires, splitter and Ethernet and ABS cable.
What I am thinking about doing is connect my second computer the same way but in another room. I have another modem and all the connections.
Do you think Cox can dedect a second connection, using the same Installation Disk?? Also, if I succeed doing this, will both computers be able to run at the same time?? Everything else runs at the same time, like telephone, computers and TV. WHAT DO YOU THINK???
 
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Old 01-26-05, 04:26 PM
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Unless the modem has built in networking capabilities, I think you're going to need a router. If you get a wireless one you can connect by wire to the one closest to the modem you're using and put a wireless adapter in the remote one. Recently hooked up my desktop (with Direcway satellite intenet) and my daughter's laptop like that using a US Robotics wireless router and a wirelss card adapter in the laptop. Works really well. Also added a print server to take of the printer sharing chores.
 
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Old 01-26-05, 04:29 PM
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The following applies to my area, probably to yours as well;

You cannot have more than one cable moden installed, period.
The easiest way to do what you want is to use a broadband router, both machines will have access independant of each other, and you do not need to install the software on the second PC, and yo can likely remove it from the first one as well, it serves no usefull purpose after your account has been set up. Most providers only allow 1 IP, any extras you have to pay for, the router takes care of this as well.
 
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Old 01-26-05, 05:44 PM
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2nd cable hookup

Iam not sure what you mean by each router is independent of each other.
Are you saying All I have to do is hookup the Broadband router to the 2nd PC just like I did with PC 1?? On PC 1 I hooked up with the Ethernet plug. With PC 2 I will have to hook up USB. Does this sound like it will work??
Thanks
 
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Old 01-26-05, 06:35 PM
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each modem will send out a signal that identifies it. the cable company will only allow one modem, and at that, they have to have the numbers for it, so they can add it to the list of allowed signals.

all you need do is hook the computers to the router, and the router to the cable modem. what happens is that the router will keep your one ip address, and no matter how many computers are behind it accessing the internet, it only looks like one. each computer will have internet access, regardless of what any other computer is doing, because they would all go through the router to the modem, instead of having to go through another computer to the modem.

you just need one router, and hook both pc's to it.
 
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Old 01-26-05, 07:02 PM
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Tae did a bit better job of explaining, computers hook to router (over 300 of them if you need that many), router hooks to cable modem, all have internet access.
 
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Old 01-27-05, 05:24 AM
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You'd need a second router to connect up 300 computers!
 
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Old 01-27-05, 05:53 AM
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Correct, mine only supports 253 PC's
 
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Old 01-27-05, 08:38 AM
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Maybe this will help....

...if you think of the router in the same way you think of a splitter for your cable.

-The cable comes into your house.

-Use the cable splitter they sent you so you now have two cables.

-One cable will go to serve your TV(s), the other will go to the modem they sent you.

-From the modem (now hooked up to the cable) use the ethernet cable to connect from the modem to the router.

-Now that the router is connected you can connect (via ethernet cable) to as many computers as there are outputs on the router.

-Then first time, power things up in order from the outside in. Modem, router, then computer(s). After the first time, the router and modem just stay on and you turn on your computer as you always have.

-You'll probably have to run the install disk that came with your modem at this point if you haven't already. Follow the prompts and you should be all set to go.

If you're like me, all you need is a 4-way router for which you can probably find for $50 or less. I currently only need it for my computer and my Xbox, but I have the flexibility to add a computer for my daughter when she's older and maybe another computer if we ever have need for a home office or something.

Now wireless is a little bit different and someone else will have to run you through that, but unless you have a long distance between computers and the router, which would necessitate buying a lot of ethernet cable and/or the task of feeding it through walls/crawlspace (or are using a laptop that you like to move around the house) I'd chose to stay away from wireless as you don't have to worry about interference from coordless phones, neighbors who also have wireless internet, or adding hardware to the computer you already have, etc, because you're directly connected. However, that's just me. What you do will depend on your needs and budget. I was able to hook all of my stuff up with 30-40 ft of ethernet cable total, so it was definitely cheaper/more secure for me to do it that way.

I hope this didn't come across as condesending/overly simplistic, but this is possibly the ONE thing I know how to do regarding computers (although someone please correct me if I got something wrong or missed a step), and with more people switching to broadband I wanted to put things as simply as possible. That way, maybe real novices (like my parents or in-laws, for example) will come across this thread and might be able to follow the instructions and do this themselves rather than paying someone else to do it or being intimidated and just settling for dialup if they have or are thinking of getting more than one computer.

In any case I hope that helps.

-Matt

P.S. sorry for any/all spelling errors. Years of automatic spellcheck (and possibly lead paint) have made me soft in that regard.
 
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Old 01-28-05, 01:45 PM
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Not sure for n'olans, but for cox service here, the only way you can connect a modem to the network is by supplying the mac address to the cable company. They already had the address of the first one, since they sent it to you.

In order for you to use your router, you will need to call cox and tell them what you want to do (don't hook up the router yet, but have it available for connecting). They will need to 'fully provision' the modem for use on the network. Until then, it won't work with the router.

Just had to do this (twice) setting up two relatives systems with routers.

Though I see your reasoning behind wanting to use a 2cd modem.
 
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Old 01-28-05, 03:48 PM
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Actually, I don't see a reason for wanting to use a second modem. The computers would have a very hard time talking to each other through the modems.

As for a mac address, the router doesn't have one, but the computer and the router do. The cable modem has a hardware address. It is similar to a mac address, but also quite different.
 
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Old 01-28-05, 05:08 PM
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you shouldnt have to let cox know. the only reason they know i have a router is that when things go down, they cant ping my computer, so i had to tell them i had one. it's no big deal, and there really is no special setup through them to have one. they do "have" to have the numbers from the modem in order to let it on the network. you can't just simply hook a modem to the line and be online.
the router simply takes the place of the computer. it goes...cable line/modem/router/computers

the router just makes it look like there is only one computer there, even if you have 200, and it keeps track of which computer sends/gets which "signal".
 
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Old 01-28-05, 09:41 PM
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Being able to use a 2cd modem on the other machine would mean he wouldn't have to share bandwidth between them.


But as I said, you do have to call and let them know, you will have to wait until they have provisioned the modem on the network before you can connect it using a router. Already done this twice, had to do it the same way both times. Connect the modem, call cox, get it authorized, then connect the router. Don't just get a new modem and connect to to the router, and then expect it to work through it before being authorized.

Then again, your area may be different, that's just the way it works around here.
 
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Old 01-28-05, 10:34 PM
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Originally Posted by Pendragon
Being able to use a 2cd modem on the other machine would mean he wouldn't have to share bandwidth between them.
Yes, the two modems WILL share bandwidth. Just like you share bandwith with the rest of the neighborhood. That is the nature of cable broadband.

Now, perhaps you are referring to the speed limitation often imposed on cable subscribers. In that case, theoretically this is true. Each PC would individually get the max speed without sharing. That, however, would be considered defeating of the service limitations by the cable co. and probably thus be construed as theft of service.


Originally Posted by Pendragon
But as I said, you do have to call and let them know, you will have to wait until they have provisioned the modem on the network before you can connect it using a router. Already done this twice, had to do it the same way both times.
As Tae said, there is no reason they need to know about the router. I've hooked up my cable modem twice (2nd time was when I moved). I've never told them I had a router. The first time, I simply had the modem provisioned, then connected the router. I didn't even have to re-provision my modem after moving to our house. I never installed their software either, BTW. When they asked me to, I kindly declined.


Originally Posted by Pendragon
Connect the modem, call cox, get it authorized, then connect the router. Don't just get a new modem and connect to to the router, and then expect it to work through it before being authorized.
My read of rlodriguss' post tells me that the modem has already been provisioned, so he doesn't need to do this:
Originally Posted by rlodriguss
I just got Cox High Speed Internet, which I hooked up myself and connected with an Installation disk.

Rlodriguss:
The advise to get a broadband router is very good. In addition to providing a way to connect multiple PC's to your broadband cable service, it provides your PC's a layer of protection from internet hackers. For that reason, I recommend a router even if you only have one PC connected. (Thus, with two cable modems on two PCs, you would need two routers to provide that protection...now THAT's ugly. )

You implied that the 2nd computer does not have a ethernet port:
Originally Posted by rlodriguss
With PC 2 I will have to hook up USB. Does this sound like it will work??
To use a router, you must add an ethernet adapter to this computer. If you have Win98SE or later on it, you can purchase a USB network adapter. These are available either wired or wireless. If the old PC has Win95 or the original Win98, you will probably need to install an internal ethernet adapter. I do not know of ANY USB networking gear that will have drivers for Win95/original Win98, and I would be VERY surprised if there are any wireless adapters that support those older operating systems.


Post the specs on the second PC, and we can advise how to add networking to it.
 
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Old 01-29-05, 08:40 AM
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Originally Posted by chirkware
Yes, the two modems WILL share bandwidth. Just like you share bandwith with the rest of the neighborhood. That is the nature of cable broadband.

Now, perhaps you are referring to the speed limitation often imposed on cable subscribers. In that case, theoretically this is true. Each PC would individually get the max speed without sharing. That, however, would be considered defeating of the service limitations by the cable co. and probably thus be construed as theft of service.
Of course it would, unless he wanted to pay for double service.
Didn't say it was right, said I understood why he might want to.
An informal survey of local users shows that I have the highest service of any of them. But, I also have business internet (4mb/512), which automatically gives me 1mb more than residential (3mb/256). For $30 more, I could up to 6mb/1mb service, I've been seriously considering it, as I know at of least 2 more homes that are on this node now..

As Tae said, there is no reason they need to know about the router. I've hooked up my cable modem twice (2nd time was when I moved). I've never told them I had a router. The first time, I simply had the modem provisioned,
And as I said *in this area* you must, or your service will not work. I don't know what additional information they send to the modem, but without it, the modem won't work off a router. Even if it's already been setup for prior service. If he can connect his router without the phone call, fine, but if he connects it and his internet doesn't work, this is probably why.

[QUOTE
then connected the router. I didn't even have to re-provision my modem after moving to our house. I never installed their software either, BTW. When they asked me to, I kindly declined.
[/QUOTE]

When I moved, I had my service transfered, only it never actually got done in the cable system. Service worked at my new address just fine, because I was on the same node as my old service. They still billed me, they just didn't have the correct service address. Worked out ok for me, as they waived the $150 transfer fee for making the mistake and gave me the next month service free.

I've never installed their software either, don't know why anyone does, unless they are led to believe it's required.
 
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Old 01-29-05, 10:08 AM
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When Time Warner originally installed RoadRunner in this area they required a login. You had to install their software in order to provide this login. At the same time you installed their login software they also installed a version of Internet Explorer that was doctored up. You didn't have to use their version of Internet Explorer, but most people did. Eventually they dropped their login requirement.

Many people who own computers will simply insert a disk and install software, without realizing what it is for, or determining if they need it. This is similar to the virus problem. Some people who get attachments in email will open them without having any clue why they are doing so.
 
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Old 01-29-05, 03:01 PM
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Cox High Speed Internet

Originally Posted by Davejb
Tae did a bit better job of explaining, computers hook to router (over 300 of them if you need that many), router hooks to cable modem, all have internet access.
THANK YOU GUYS FOR ALL YOUR INPUTS, BUT THIS IS
WHAT I AM THINKING . IF I CAN CONNECT 4 TV'S IN 4 DIFFERENT ROOMS, 3 OF WHICH I CONNECTED MYSELF, WHY CAN I NOT BE ABLE TO DO THE SAME WITH ONE MORE COMPUTER??. SEEMS TO ME THAT IF I CONNECT THE SECOND COMPUTER JUST AS I DID THE FIRST COMPUTER, BUT IN A DIFFERENT ROOM, AND NOT USE THE SOFTWARE, IT SHOULD WORK UNDECTECTED, JUST LIKE THE 3 EXTRA TV'S IAM USING. DOES THIS SOUND LOGICAL??
I PREFER NOT TO CONNECT BY ETHERNET CABLE IF AT ALL POSSIBLE, TOO LONG A DISTANCE, APPROX 60 FT.(SE DEN TO NW BEDROOM.) I TRIED WIRELESS, DIDN'T WORK, TOO MANY WALLS, TV'S AND CELL PHONES.
 
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Old 01-29-05, 04:00 PM
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You cannot hook up computers the same way as you hook up your TVs. Your TV signal is "dumb", which is why it can be split to multiple TVs (as long as the signal is strong enough). Your cable internet signal is not the same as the TV signal. What you want to do simply won't work. When you hook up your cable modem, your computer becomes part of a huge network. Your cable company runs the server, and your computer is identified by your computer (or router's) IP address. It is up to the cable company whether it allows you to communicate on that network. You are allowed to use that network by virtue of the fact that you pay for internet access. Simply plugging a new computer into that signal doesn't automatically allow that computer to communicate with your cable co's server.

Are you balking at running the cable because you think it might be too difficult, or because you think it's too far away (60 ft is not far at all, in cat5 terms).
 
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Old 01-29-05, 04:52 PM
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ok, here's the problem. each modem has a specific number assigned to it internally by the factory. it is hardwired in..(i know it can be hacked, just trying to keep it simple) each time any information goes out, that number is sent at the beginning of the message, and if that number does not match a number on the providers server, the information is not allowed through. once the modem is "authenticated", or recognized by the provider, you can move it around, or hook it up to a different computer, but only one computer at a time, unless they are networked either by a hub,switch, router, or direct cable connection from one computer to another.
you can put a router anywhere, including in the middle of the two computers, so each would have a run of 30 feet. they are small....mine is the same size as my modem, and can be mounted in any way, sideways,upsidedown, etc.

anyway, as you can see, a cable video signal is stupid, in other words, its always there, and requires no authentication from a television(yet), whereas the internet signal part of it does require authentication from the hardware to work.
 
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Old 01-30-05, 11:45 AM
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The Cheapest way

is to put a second network card into your first computer and use ICS (Internet connection sharing) on that computer (which is included with Windows).

Then run an ethernet crossover cable (not an ethernet patch cable, make sure it is a crossover cable) from the main computer to the second one.

The best way (but not the cheapest) to do this is to buy a wireless router with two wireless network cards and connect it after your cable modem. Enable WEP and create a wireless access list so your neighbors can't use your broadband connection for free or do any packet sniffing on your network.

But seriously, someone who doesn't know why a broadband connection cannot be split like an analog TV signal should probably get outside help to do anything.
 
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Old 02-04-05, 10:06 PM
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Yea, but he wouldn't need two wireless cards. Just put the router where the closest computer is to a cable connection, and plug it all in there. He'll need to sell the modem and probably get professional help.
 
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