Hard Drive

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Old 04-24-05, 06:00 AM
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Hard Drive size smaller

I have a computer running win 98se and I put in a maxtor 32 gb HD and windows only shows it as a 10 gb, I have flash the bios and it still shows up as a 10gb, is there something else I need to do after flashing the bios?

Thanks Paul
 

Last edited by pallen; 04-24-05 at 06:13 AM. Reason: Title
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Old 04-24-05, 06:51 AM
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How old is the motherboard? If it's pretty old then it may be your limiting factor, not Windows. Does the bios update readme say anything about hard drive size support?
 
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Old 04-24-05, 08:58 AM
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The computer is about 5 yrs old but I have a felling the mother board was not exactly very new to the system. I will check the read me file tomorrow
(computer is at office) Thanks for the reply
Paul
 
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Old 04-26-05, 08:02 AM
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Did you run the installation CD that came with the drive?
 
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Old 04-26-05, 08:50 AM
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I did at first but not after I upgraded the bios, Do you think I can without needing to format?
Paul
 
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Old 04-27-05, 04:08 AM
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Hmmm...Try this hard drive in another machine and see how much space the other (preferably newer) machine sees the drive as.

Check the space with FDISK so you know you are looking at the whole drives capacity, not just the size of a partition.


We've had a few Maxtor hard drives that did this same thing. If I remember right, they were labelebed as 20Gb drives, but PC's only saw them as 10Gb. The PC's were newer machines that did not have relevant BIOS limitations, and we got the same result with multiple machines. Our conclusion was that the drives were actually mislabeled, and really were 10Gb drives. I've ONLY seen this with Maxtor drives.

BIOS/operating system limitations would seem unlikely to me as 10Gb was never a capacity ceiling that I am aware of. I remember 528Mb, 2Gb, 8Gb, 128Gb (If I recall correctly). All are powers of 2. 10Gb is definately not a power of 2...
 
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Old 04-27-05, 05:47 AM
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I was wrong in my fisrt post, windows only sees it as a 2 GB not 10, will try it in another machine and let u know!
Thanks
Paul
 
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Old 04-27-05, 06:08 AM
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Originally Posted by pallen
I was wrong in my fisrt post, windows only sees it as a 2 GB not 10, will try it in another machine and let u know!
OK, that makes more sense. There are two possible causes of a 2Gb limit:
1) BIOS limitation<--BIOS upgrade *may* cure. Alternately, PCI drive controller or drive overlay software. 2Gb BIOS limit was fixed during the mid Pentium I era, so early to mid P I's, probably P Pro's, and *maybe* a few early PII's had this limitation.
2) Drive is partitioned as FAT16 rather than FAT32.

I'll address option 2, since you have already dealt with option 1, and trying the drive in another PC should eliminate it altogether:
Make sure in FDISK, when the question is asked about large disk support, that you answer YES. If you say no, you are stuck with FAT16, which is an operating system limitation that restricts you to 2Gb. You can still have larger drives than 2Gb with FAT16, but they must be partitioned into chunks 2Gb or less each. FAT32 will allow this entire drive to be seen as one piece.


Note that there is a bug in the Windows 98 format program that will cause it to incorrectly display the drive/partitions size during the format when its size is 10Gb or larger. You will likely see the drive size displayed with only two digits after the comma rather than three, or something goofy looking like that (sorry, I can't recall right off...been a while). The first two digits give you the approximate size in Gb.
 
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Old 04-27-05, 07:13 AM
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I tried to check to see if it was in FAT16 or 32 but it says just FAT no # So it sounds like I would have to refomat anywhere in oreder for this to show more than 2 gb (maybe), This is the boss's computer (so It doesn't get much use lol) and he has a gateway at home that he doesn't use any more with window 98 which was bought about the same time as the problem unit and another in the office and I think it will be more up to date then the problem one which was a built unit (must have been built with old parts!) So I will make 1 out of the 2. Will let you know how I make out
Thanks for the replys
Paul
 
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Old 04-27-05, 07:47 AM
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FAT is FAT16, and the 2GB makes more sense, as others have said there is no 10GB barrier, very likely a BIOS limitation or when Fdisk was used, the option for large drive support (FAT32) was not selected.
 
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Old 04-27-05, 07:50 AM
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Originally Posted by pallen
I tried to check to see if it was in FAT16 or 32 but it says just FAT no #
It is FAT16 then.

Originally Posted by pallen
So it sounds like I would have to refomat anywhere in oreder for this to show more than 2 gb
Make sure to first get any data you need off this drive before proceeding...This process will delete it all.

You will need to first run FDISK. Answer yes to the large disk question. Choose the option to delete the existing partition(s). If there are multiple partitions, you'll have to delete the extended partition first, then the primary. Once done, create a new primary partition. Unless you want the drive to have multiple partitions, just let it use the default size, which will give you the whole drive as one piece.

Once done in FDISK, reboot, then format the new, bigger C drive.

There are a few threads where I've given people detailed, step-by-step instructions on W98/98se installation. I'll try to post a link to one of them if it'll help.
 
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Old 04-27-05, 08:23 AM
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Windows 98/98se fresh install

Boot from your Windows 98 CD. If you have to boot from a floppy disk (ie, machine ignores Windows 98 CD), go to www.bootdisk.com and download the Win98 boot image. Run the file you download to create a boot diskette (you'll need one blank 1.44Mb disk). Answer Yes to the question of whether you want CD-ROM support.

1. Take note of the drive letter the MSCDEX driver assigns to the CD-ROM drive (one of the last things you'll see before you see the A:\> prompt)

2. At the A: prompt, type "format c: /u /s" (u = Unconditional format, s = copy system files). Enjoy a Coke...this'll take a while (You can add a /q at the end of the format line to do a quick format).

It'll ask you for a label when its done. Put in anything or nothing, it doesn't matter.

3. When the format completes, type the following commands hitting enter after each:

c:

md windows

cd windows

md options

cd options

md cabs

cd cabs

4. Put your Win98 disk in the CD ROM drive and type:

copy d:\win98 (***If your CD ROM is NOT D:, change the letter to the letter you noted in step 1)

Watch for error messages. See note below if you have any errors.

5. Remove the boot floppy, the 98 CD, and reboot

6. At the C:\> prompt, type c:\windows\options\cabs\setup

7. Follow the prompts. At some point, you will be asked where you want to put the windows files, and it will *probably* default to c:\windows.000 Change it to c:\windows, and say OK to the warning that the folder exists.



By doing what I prescribed, you will eliminate the need to do the install directly from the CD. If the CD has problems, they will be found in step 3, not during the actual install process. If you get error messages in step 4, you have either a bad 98 CD, or a bad CD-ROM, and you will need to get a replacement/loaner.

The other advantage of this is that whenever your computer needs something off the 98 CD, it shouldn't have to prompt you for the disk since everything it needs will be in the C:\windows\options\cabs folder.

I've done this proceedure dozens of times (perhaps closer to hundreds). Works like a charm...
 
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Old 04-27-05, 01:36 PM
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Chirk's method is a good one. I actually have a batch file on a 95, 98, and ME boot floppy with cd drivers that accomplishes the same thing when I redo customers machines, makes the directories, copies the files, then starts Windows setup from the copied CAB files on the hard drive with one command.
 
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