Starting points for open source OS

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Old 12-30-05, 06:30 AM
John Whorfin's Avatar
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Starting points for open source OS

Been a Network Admin for years, but have always worked with MS.

I want to get into and learn some open source OS for my own knowledge and also for some job related functions. I will search the internet for info, but if anyone has some good web sites or info that would speed along my quest I would appreciate it.

Does anyone prefer a particular Open source OS more than others?

Thanks
 
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Old 12-30-05, 01:15 PM
bf140-Albert
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Google 'open source OS'

I just did a Google search to see what I might find. Most of the open source OS items were related to Macs. Since Apple produces both the HW and SW for its computers, there is not much common ground for understanding for the MS or IBM oriented professional. As I remember from a much simpler Apple machine I bought for my daughter years ago, the programming was much more difficult and strange than I ever imagined!

Linux is a popular easy to get UNIX based OS that runs on IBM PCs. You can find user groups and forums devoted to it. Printed materials are easy to find as well. You will find serveral books on it in the computer sections in Borders or Barnes & Noble. As if that isn't enough, your local Community College may have courses for Linux, too.
 
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Old 12-30-05, 03:51 PM
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there are various "flavours" of linux. check out the info and download sections:
http://www.linux.org/


Those curious to see the capabilities of Linux can download a live CD version called Knoppix . http://www.knoppix.org/
It comes with everything you might need to carry out day-to-day tasks on the computer and it needs no installation. It will run from a CD in a computer capable of booting from the CD drive. Those choosing to continue using Linux can find a variety of versions or "distributions" of Linux that are easy to install, configure and use. Information on these products is available in our distribution section and can be found by selecting the mainstream/general public category.

Freebsd is another popular choice:http://www.freebsd.org/

Another is free dos: http://www.freedos.org/
 
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Old 12-30-05, 10:47 PM
hevnsnt
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John,

If you are serious about learning linux, (which by Opensource I assume) I cannot say too much about Ubuntu Linux (http://www.ubuntulinux.org/). As with any system, immersion is the best way to learn, but here is the thing about Ubuntu:

It just works.

Not only that, but they have a VERY active community, and help is always right around the corner. If you want my advice, download the Live CD of Ubuntu, and boot your computer with it. It will allow you to test it out without installing it. Then go ahead and take the plunge and install it on a spare machine you have laying around (or a laptop)
 
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Old 12-31-05, 07:33 AM
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Thanks for all the feedback. I did some searching as well and found some pretty good sites that list info about each. Of course like anything else, there is so much out there it is hard to find the good sites with usefull information.


This site actually seemed pretty good as a starting point. Listed lots of open sources OS's and info about them.
http://www.freeos.com/

Think I will start out with one of the Linux OS's and FreeBSD and see how I make out with those two.

THanks All
 
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Old 01-01-06, 09:56 AM
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We use a lot of different flavors of OS at work... We've got a bunch of RedHat and Fedora, which I wouldn't recommend unless you've got your heart set on doing a lot of reading, tweaking, and futzing around (which *I* enjoy!).

The other day, I put Ubuntu on a spare machine and I'm pretty impressed with it. I bet I could give this to my parents and they'd be able to use it without any problems (they're my mythical test case for end users!). For casual desktop use, it's very well done. Worth a look!

-Chris-
 
 

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