Power Switch

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Old 02-13-06, 12:18 PM
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Power Switch

We're afraid to turn our PC off. Every time we do it takes forever to get the power switch to actually switch on the PC. Usually a long totally unpowered (i.e. unplugged) period works. I'm thinking I should just replace the power supply but I'm not sure. Any ideas?
 
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Old 02-13-06, 12:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Who
We're afraid to turn our PC off. Every time we do it takes forever to get the power switch to actually switch on the PC. Usually a long totally unpowered (i.e. unplugged) period works. I'm thinking I should just replace the power supply but I'm not sure. Any ideas?
That's probably your best bet. Unless its something exotic power supplies are fairly cheap and easy to replace.
 
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Old 02-13-06, 05:31 PM
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Changing the power supply never hurts... but there's times when power supplies go into a power lock.

If you unplug the power cord from the back of the computer, leave the main power switch on the power supply on (if equipped), then press and hold the power button for 10 seconds or so. This will drain the power supply.

Plug the unit back in and see if it boots right away.
 
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Old 02-13-06, 06:45 PM
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Thanks - there are no switches on this power supply. I'm just hesitant to switch power supplies unless needed because I'll probably end up with too few power connectors for all the drives or something silly like that forcing extra downtime. Would 3 or 4 AA batteries in series (4.5 - 6v) wired through a pushbutton swith connected to the power button work instead? (I'm only 2% serious on this <g>)
 
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Old 02-13-06, 09:40 PM
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A switch is just a way to open and close a circuit. When a circuit is closed that meand there is a closed loop that electricity can flow through.

Why not just, as a test, connect the two wires for the switch together. Then use the power cord, or whatever, to power on the computer. This is nothing different than what happens when you press the switch. What you are testing is if the switch is bad. If you are able to turn on the computer easier then it is a bad switch.

From the description of your problem it doesn't sound like a bad switch but you had better find out...a switch can cost $2 whereas a power supply can cost $40. Big difference.

I had a switch on my (wood working) router get clogged up with saw dust. I took it apart and cleaned it, works like a charm. I can think of SEVERAL people that would have thought the router burned up and got a new one...all it took me was about 20 minutes and a little effort.

Good luck.

Joe
 
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Old 02-13-06, 11:35 PM
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Originally Posted by JoeVB
Why not just, as a test, connect the two wires for the switch together. Then use the power cord, or whatever, to power on the computer. This is nothing different than what happens when you press the switch.
Joe
Got me doing a double take on this one...

The switches on newer pc's are a normally open circuit, push button to close then open again when released. The circuit does not remain closed anymore. You do not want to hotwire these switches. It's not that easy to do anyway with the existing wiring in the case. If you want to bypass the switch, use a jumper on the motherboard, directly at the "power switch" pins, and hit them momentarily. If you want to be savvy, you can open the tower and move the "reset" line to the "power" line and use the reset switch.

How old is your computer? What brand?

If your computer powers up after "long periods of being unplugged", then it's probably a power supply issue. Don't buy a cheap power supply, spend the extra 40 bucks and get a decent one. They are "usually" easily replaced, depending on case layout and/or brand name.
 
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Old 02-15-06, 02:23 AM
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I had a problem like this with some tower style computers a school I worked at owned. The towers had a plastic front with a power switch in the middle. The power switch was mounted in a plastic bracket that was open in the back. These brackets eventually cracked allowing the power switches to slip back into the front panel to the point that you could not push them in to turn them on. You simply could not get the tip of your finger to push them far enough to make contact. I disassembled the tower case and then carefully removed the front panel. I put a wire around the bracket to put pressure on the switch to hold it in place then, but now I think I would simply use some "Super Glue" to glue the switches back in place. These computers were locally assembled so the liklihood of ever getting replacement parts was nil.
 
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