DSL Networking Question

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Old 12-17-06, 04:20 PM
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DSL Networking Question

I have Verizon DSL right now and my brother just moved in and he has a dell desktop and I would like to hook that up so it will have internet access. He has an internal modem and Ethernet card but I need a card that has a little antenna on it that comes out the back of the computer correct?? This won't take place right away b/c we have to totally delete the OS (XP) on the computer and then reinstall it b/c you can't even turn it on. Any help will be appreciated!!! Thanks
 
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Old 12-17-06, 05:06 PM
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First question: Does YOUR computer have a network card?

You will need a router for starters. It goes next after the DSL modem and then your network cables go from the router to your computer(s). If you want to go wireless, which is somewhat less secure and a little slower, you will need at least one wireless network card. Normally the computer that is closest to the DSL modem and router is simply networked by cable and the other computers either also have cables run to them or go wireless.

If you search archives here you'll find quite a few posts on the subject.
 
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Old 12-17-06, 05:57 PM
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Verizon DSL

I used to have Verizon DSL (switched to Fios! Zoom!) and can offer some insight here. If I remember correctly, Verizon has already given you a router.. probably a 4 port one. Your DSL modem is already plugged in to it and most likely so is your computer. There should be at least 2 ports left open on it.

All you need to add additional computers is a normal Cat-5 ethernet cable. Plug one end of that cable in to any open port on the router and the other end in to the new computers ethernet port. Depending on the layout, you may need a very long cable and I wont even get in to how you will get the other end to where it needs to be. Thats up to you.

You will need to tell Windows to let the network assign and IP address automatically, and same for the gateways.

If you want to connect the new computer via wireless, you will need to replace the current router with a wireless one (one with an antena) and tinker with the router settings so you are not accepting everyone's computer within range on your network. It will eliminate the need for that long cable, but usually at the expense of some speed.
 
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Old 12-17-06, 08:58 PM
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There are many generations of DSL modems that Verizon has provided.

The earliest were nothing but a modem. The real IP address is provided at the Ethernet port of the modem. If you have this type then you need a router. Either a wired router or a wireless one.

Another type of DSL modem provided by Verizon includes a firewall and router. However, only a single Ethernet port is provided. The real IP address is translated and the router provides a non-Internet routable IP address through DHCP. To use this DSL modem with multiple machines all you need is an Ethernet hub or switch. You can also use a router with these, but that adds a second level of network address translation.

Another type of DSL modem provided by Verizon includes a firewall router and has multiple ports (typically four). As long as you don't have more than four devices, you can plug them directly into the DSL modem. To use more than four devices you need either an Ethernet hub or switch.

Finally, Verizon sometimes offers DSL modems that include a wireless firewall router.

You need to understand what you have and go from there.

Unless you know what you are doing or are willing to learn, I recommend you avoid wireless. Wireless requires that you enable any and all security on the router. any people don;t do this, and it isn't enabled right out of the box. Their networks are available (usually without their knowledge) to their neighbors, and worse yet to people driving down the streets looking for networks and computers to snoop for personal information.
 
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