Hard drive erased...

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Old 07-15-07, 05:06 PM
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Hard drive erased...

I've got a hard drive that I think is still good. I installed a linux program on it to mess with and when i went back to put xp (tried other platforms also) on it the puter says no hard drive found. If i piggyback it to another pc it shows up in device manager but no dice on 'My Computer'. I was thinking mabye the mbr is messed up but not sure how else to get into the hard drive or repair it. Any help would be appreciated. Tnx......

P.s. Its a maxtor brand and does not making any funny noises either if that helps any.
 
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Old 07-15-07, 10:21 PM
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Once a hard drive is partitioned with Linux, it can be hard to get it where you can use it with Windows again. Unfortunately, the partitioning program in Windows setup just won't get it right.

Two things you can do:
1. Boot off the Linux disk (see * below) and get into it's FDISK utility. Have it delete all partitions, then have it write a new blank DOS partition table. Be sure to have it save changes (it may complain that it can't proceed without a partition, in which case you can have it create a FAT or FAT32 partition). Once this is done, shut down and put in the XP disk. It should be able to see and change partitions now.

2. If the above fails, download DBAN (http://dban.sourceforge.net/) and run the most basic disk wipe it does. This will wipe out all partitioning info. Then boot off the XP disk and proceed as if the drive is new.

Good luck and post back your results!


*This was actually easier with older Linux boot disks such as RedHat 6, which did not compain if you saved a blank partition table without creating a new partition...the newer versions are too "smart" to allow you to do that, since 99% of people running a Linux install disk are, after all, installing Linux, and will need a partition to proceed.
 
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Old 07-16-07, 07:48 AM
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easy fix

The partition table isn't a problem, windows just doesn't know what the partition is or what to do with it, so it is ignored. This is simple to fix, just follow the steps below:

Control Panel -> Administrative tools -> Computer Mangement

Click on Disk Management in the panel on the left (it's under stroage)

You will now see all the partitions on the drive in the right panel.

Right click on the volume you want to format and select format

Right click again and assign a drive letter

It will now show up in "My Computer" as a usable drive.
 
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Old 07-16-07, 12:43 PM
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Also remember, Windows will not let you format any partition that has the OS installed on it while in Windows. You can only format partitions that are for recovery/extra type storage.


I've used the DBAN program that chirkware mentioned many times. It works well and formats better.
 
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Old 07-17-07, 06:54 PM
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Tnx for the replies. I've been busy lately but will go try some of these tips tonight, hopefully, and reply as soon as i get a chance. Tnx
 
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Old 07-18-07, 03:11 PM
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Well I got to play with this a bit last night. I first tried Joker's way, which seemed the easiest, but I dont get anything under Disk Management but the "Healthy" C: drive thats in use. Maybe I missed something.

I tried chirkware's dban way but I think I need to play with that some more. I d/l'ed the file at the top of the list off the link and made a floppy disk to work from. I then went to the command list and used the "quick" command. All seems to go well till the end, it keeps wanting to write files to the floppy. I didnt know if I had to keep going after # 14 when i ran out of space and disks on hand. So maybe I'm doing something wrong here also or need more floppy disks? I'll try going further tonight but maybe whoever has used this can tell me if this is what it's supposed to do. Tnx

I'll try linux after I play a bit more with Dban.
 
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Old 07-19-07, 01:59 AM
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Remove Partitions

I would suggest you download delpart.exe. Just google that file and you will find it easily. This program is simple and works in most cases.
 
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Old 07-19-07, 09:32 AM
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Sorry my easy way didn't work. It has for me in the past but that dosen't mean much for you I suppose.

Just in case you aren't familiar with the 'nix command line here is how to use fdisk
from the comand line first verify which drive you want to modify.
The following command (executed as root) will list all your drives and the partitions on those drives
/fdisk -l

your drives will be identified something like the following: /dev/hda /dev/hdb /dev/sda

now lets assume you want to modify the slave drive on the primary IDE channel (a.k.a. /dev/hdb) type at the command line:
/fdisk /dev/hdb

from there it is pretty self explanitory.

FWIW, If dban ran for a while it very well may have already wiped out your partition table so you may be good to go already.
 
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Old 07-19-07, 04:17 PM
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Found this utility on the maxtor site.

SeaTools for Windows
SeaTools for Windows has replaced SeaTools Online and PowerMax. SeaTools for Windows is a comprehensive, easy-to-use diagnostic tool that helps you quickly determine the condition of the disc drive in your external hard drive, desktop or notebook computer. It includes several tests that will examine the physical media on your Seagate or Maxtor disc drive and any other non-Seagate disc drive.



http://www.seagate.com/ww/v/index.jsp?locale=en-US&name=SeaTools&vgnextoid=720bd20cacdec010VgnVCM100000dd04090aRCRD
 
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Old 07-23-07, 08:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Booming View Post
Well I got to play with this a bit last night. I first tried Joker's way, which seemed the easiest, but I dont get anything under Disk Management but the "Healthy" C: drive thats in use. Maybe I missed something.

I tried chirkware's dban way but I think I need to play with that some more. I d/l'ed the file at the top of the list off the link and made a floppy disk to work from. I then went to the command list and used the "quick" command. All seems to go well till the end, it keeps wanting to write files to the floppy. I didnt know if I had to keep going after # 14 when i ran out of space and disks on hand. So maybe I'm doing something wrong here also or need more floppy disks? I'll try going further tonight but maybe whoever has used this can tell me if this is what it's supposed to do. Tnx

I'll try linux after I play a bit more with Dban.

Sorry for not responding sooner...At the end, Dban gives you the chance to write a log file to document what it does...I never bother with it.

Joker's method did not work, because Windows does not understand how to deal with the Linux partition table...it just does not manipulate it correctly. That's why you need Linux to delete it's partition table and make you a new, blank, DOS partition table (or, use DBAN and kill every last bit and byte on the drive). I learned this several years ago after we took an old drive array out of service that had a Linux partition table on the 14Gb IDE drives. I pulled the drives and tried to use them as replacement drives on Windows 95 PC's. I went through the entire install process...partition, format, install W95, all looked good, but, when done, the machine could not boot the OS off that drive (and yes, the partition was marked "Active")...I finally found that it was because of remnants of the Linux partition table. Unfortunately, I did not have DBAN back then. The Linux boot disk fdisk trick I mentioned before worked though...I think it was Red Hat 6 I used then. Once I started doing that, I was successful in recycling all of the 14Gb drives from that old array (hey, back then, a 14Gb drive was worth something!).

The beauty of DBAN is that if it runs a complete wipe of the drive (even the most basic single pass), there will be NO partition left on the drive...DBAN overwrites EVERYTHING. When you boot from the Windows CD, it is just like having a brand new, unpartioned drive. It sounds like you got to that point...just forget the log at the end and reboot with your Windows disk...
 
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Old 07-24-07, 09:41 AM
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I just want to correct chirkware. Windows can read a partition table created with linux, at least Win 2k on up, I haven't ever tried with Win ME, 98, or 95. I know this for fact as I have windows currently installed in a partition created with linux, and that windows install can see all the other linux created partitions on my machine through the disk management tool (although windows cannot identify the filesystem types). I have also successfully converted 'nix partitions to windows partitions through the same tool. Now, I am not sure under what exact circumstances this all works, I just wanted to note that it can work.
 
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Old 07-24-07, 09:45 AM
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joker,

Whether or not Linux can see a Windows partition and Windows can see a Linux partition depends on how the partition was formatted. If attempting to be able to access the partitions from either OS, it is necessary to make changes to the defaults.
 
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Old 07-24-07, 12:27 PM
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Seeing a partition and being able to read the partition are two different issues. Yes, reading the data depends on the type of formatting. I was clarifing that a linux created partition table can be read by windows. That is to say windows can see that the partitions exist, it just can't read the data on them. And yes, there are ways to read linux partitions from windows and vise-versa as you alluded to, but that is way beyond the scope of the origional post.

chirkware stated that windows can not read a linux partition table, in my experiance this has not been the case. Not that that helps the origional poster, but it could help someone else at some point to have that little tidbit of information.

In my experiance windows can detect all my 'nix partitions just fine. they will not be assigned a drive letter and the only place you will see them is in the disk management tool. Unfortunately this wasn't the case for Booming, and if you could explain why I would love to know.
 
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Old 07-28-07, 09:12 AM
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Download this file and make a bootable diskette with it..
Write 0s to the drive and try to install XP again..
http://geocities.com/axelmike/files/diskimages/maxtor_quantum/powermax.zip
 
 

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