Computer reboots on its own

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  #1  
Old 08-06-07, 04:37 PM
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Angry Computer reboots on its own

My computer has started to just reboot on its own I will be working away on this thing then all of a sudden it just reboots on its own no warning or anything . I an usually using a photo program editing for printing

I have an asus p4c800 delux mother bord
1 gid ram
2.80 proc

I have ran two different types ov virus scans nothing
also defraged my hard drive
a friend said could be heat issue how do you check for that
any help would be great
thanks
 
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  #2  
Old 08-06-07, 04:42 PM
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There is a hardware component in your machine that is failing or has failed.

Typically, it a failed RAM chip, but it also could be bad motherboard, power supply, vid card, or anything else in there.

Too diagnose, you usually have to remove 1 of these components at a time and see if the problem goes away.

I would start by removing 1 bank of RAM. If it reboots then, reinstall and take out another.

Keep doing this with each component until you find the problem.
 
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Old 08-06-07, 05:51 PM
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I agree on the RAM..
Have you done any over clocking? Make sure the RAM settings are correct in the BIOS..
Clean the RAM contacts with a pencil eraser..
 
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Old 08-07-07, 05:22 AM
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How old is the machine? I've seen cmos batteries cause some intermittent booting problems too when they start to die, although I agree the ram would be a good place to investigate first.
 
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Old 08-07-07, 05:48 AM
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You didn't tell us what OS you have.

Windows XP has a setting that causes it to automatically reboot on a failure. This works great if the system is unattended, but if you want information about a failure it doesn't help much.

I suggest (if you are using XP) that you turn thei setting off, and that you then attempt to learn from the "blue screen of death" that will appear on the next failure what is going wrong.

The setting is available in the Control Panel, under System, on the advanced tab, under Startup and Recovery in the settings window. I suggest that you turn off the automatic reboot and that you have an event written to the system log. if event are already being written to the system log then you can look and see why it has been previously been failing.

Windows Vista probably has a similar setting.
 
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Old 08-07-07, 08:59 PM
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my system is adout a year oold
win xp home
thank you for your help people i am going to try shutting down the syst reboot see it that gives me any help
keep you posted thanks again
 
  #7  
Old 08-07-07, 09:20 PM
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Heat

I am saying heat issue as well. Are all of your fans turning on the tower? If you feel comfortable doing it, unplug the computer and take off the side panel (usually one comes off easily, the other is screwed in place) or crack open the case (Dell systems) by pushing down two releases, one on top, one on bottom, both are towards the back.

Once inside, and out of the way, look for your fans. Got 'em located? Good, now plug the PC in and turn on and then investigate for a dysfunctional fan. There should be around 3-4 fans in there, and maybe more. One on the case itself, one inside the power-supply, one on the CPU (attached to the main board) and one on the video-card (look where your monitor plugs into your computer. That is your video card.)

My guess is the video card fan.

Now, my disclaimer for cracking the case open:
That is, if you feel comfortable doing it. Otherwise, stay out, there are high voltages in there. Use the disable auto-restart suggestion and have a pen and pencil handy to write down the numbers on the blue-screen. Take those numbers and plug them into Google. Let us know what you find.
 
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Old 08-08-07, 04:24 AM
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There are no high voltages in the case. Inside the power supply there are, but not inside the case.

You do need to be careful in the case, but not because of high voltage.
 
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Old 08-08-07, 06:06 AM
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Is the power supply not inside the case? ;-)
 
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Old 08-08-07, 07:23 AM
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Power supplies are not user serviceable. Opening the case does not imply opening the power supply.

Opening the case does not expose high voltage to the user.
 
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Old 08-08-07, 04:32 PM
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But they are user-replaceable.

You're right though, but I always like err on the side of caution when feasible, especially if it is related to new wanderers in electricity. You know, the darnedest things happen. That screwdriver might just slip in that power supply vent hole. To say there are no high voltages inside the case is misleading. To say dangerously high voltages exist inside the power supply is more correct.

Back to the OP: What happened? What did you find out? (I hope it didn't die completely...)
 
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