What type of cable?

Reply

  #1  
Old 01-06-08, 11:25 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 118
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
What type of cable?

Hello-
I have a wireless router in my basement for internet usage. Unfortunately, the signal is weak up on the second floor of my house, which renders intrenet browsing to a crawl. I wish to install a cable which will run from my router (which has 4 RJ45 ports available), through a wall, to the outside of my house, and then back in to my daughters room where my other computer resides. I have a few questions:

1. What type cable will I need?
2. Can this cable be cut or spliced, or do I need a specific length?
3. If I can cut the cable to size, what tools are needed?
4. What type box must I install in the wall?

PS- I have Verizon FIOS (fiberoptic high speed). But the existing connection to the router from Verizon's terminal is Radioshack RG-6 quad shielded cable (if that makes any difference).
Thanks in advance!
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 01-06-08, 11:31 AM
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 504
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Cat-5 will do it. As far as splicing, read this argument.
http://forum.doityourself.com/showthread.php?t=329747
 
  #3  
Old 01-06-08, 11:38 AM
Member
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 929
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by argekay View Post
Hello-

1. What type cable will I need?
2. Can this cable be cut or spliced, or do I need a specific length?
3. If I can cut the cable to size, what tools are needed?
4. What type box must I install in the wall?
It would be best to use a purchased cable with the ends already on it. Cat-5 at minimum. You can get it at most big box stores and office supply stores. Called 'patch cable', but do not get a yellow cable or 'crossover cable.' They are different.

Try to get one long enough and avoid splices.

Extra is not going to hurt anything. It wouldn't be economically feasible to purchase the tools unless you cannot find a cable long enough.

You don't HAVE to have a box in the wall, but a standard single box will do. One that can be secured without having to tear out wall covering and replace. There are boxes with 'wings' that will expand out as the box is secured in place.

If the run goes outside you will need exterior grade cable. It will be less expensive to contain the cable in a pvc conduit than to find exterior grade cat-5, I think.
 
  #4  
Old 01-06-08, 01:30 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,973
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
You can buy cable by the spool (in various lengths) and vut it to the size you need, or you can buy it by the foot cut to length. In either case you can attach the ends. No special tools are needed. Look at the big box stores, they sell the parts you need.

You install a faceplate (with or without a gull box behind it at each location. The faceplate would be for at least a single RJ-45 jack. The CAT-5E cable then attaches to the back of the jack. I recommend against running cable outside. To do so you need more expensive waterproof cable, and you have to make sure to install drip loops before having the cable enter the house. To go from router to faceplate and faceplate to PC you use standard patch cables, which I recommend that you buy rather than attempt to make.

By the way, are you sure that your router is connected using RG-6 coaxial cable? My Verizon FiOS optical Network terminator box has a standard CAT-5e cable from it that carries the Internet signal.
 
  #5  
Old 01-06-08, 02:36 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 118
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
First off-
Thank you Mdtaylor, oneofamill and racraft.
I do have to run the cable outside. Inside would be a nightmare, as I have a half-slabe type house. What type/grade of cable would you suggest for the outside?
Racraft- It is indeed RG-6 cable that runs from Verizon's terminal on the inside of my house to my router. The tech who installed it said the existing (RG-6) cable in my basement was suitable. I go to www.speakasy.net and my connection speed is 19642 kbps download and 4486 kbps upload. So I think that's about as good as it gets (this is through the RJ45 connection, not the wireless, which is slightly less).
 
  #6  
Old 01-06-08, 04:17 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,493
Received 33 Votes on 25 Posts
I had FiOS installed about a month ago and I had to specifically request the technician to use the Ethernet connection between the ONT and the router. He said they usually use the coaxial connection.

For speed testing I prefer to use http://myspeed.visualware.com/voip/ because it gives more information on the total connection. I always had decent speed when on a cable connection according to speakeasy and other speed tests but I had trouble with VoIP service. I found out it was because I had poor "Quality of Service" through the cable service.
 
  #7  
Old 01-06-08, 05:03 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 118
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Furd-
Are you saying that I should change the RG-6 cable? I do use my laptop for VOIP with the Skype program, and never had a bad connection.
Also-
Anybody have any recommendations for my outside cable?
Thanks!
 
  #8  
Old 01-06-08, 05:26 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,493
Received 33 Votes on 25 Posts
Nope, I only meant to offer what happened during my installation. I assume the coax is just fine.

As for your outside cable you need to find one that is rated (listed) for outdoors exposure with UV (ultra-violet light) protection.

Try a Google search for RJ-45 cable or Ethernet cable. The selling store should list the different cable jacket ratings.
 
  #9  
Old 01-06-08, 06:59 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 118
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Okay. Thanks Furd!
 
  #10  
Old 01-06-08, 07:54 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,973
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Wow, you learn something every day. I was not aware that FiOS Internet could be installed using the coax connector off the ONT. How does the coax connect to the router? Did they give you a special router that has a coax connector, or is there some kind of adapter? Can the coax still be used for FiOS TV?

As the others have stated, you will need cable that not only is waterproof, but also that is UV resistant. It will not be cheap.
 
  #11  
Old 01-06-08, 09:16 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,493
Received 33 Votes on 25 Posts
Yep, the router has a coax connector. I'm guessing but I suspect that they will use a cable splitter to connect the coax between the ONT, router and television cable.

Verizon is looking at offering television via FiOS around September in my area.

Maybe I should look at the CD-ROM that came with the router.
 
  #12  
Old 01-06-08, 09:26 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 118
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Racraft-
From the ONT I have nothing but coaxial cable. I have a 1 to 4 splitter that goes to 2 upstairs TV's, and the last goes to my wireless router. My router model is the MI424WR, and that has a coax type connection in the back.
By the way- thanks to all for your help on the outside cable issue!
Furd- went to the myspeed website, and I do like that one better. Thanks!
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: