wirelss print server question

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Old 03-29-08, 06:21 PM
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wirelss print server question

Hi:

Is it possible to use a wireless print server without having a wireless router

We have two laptops with wifi capability and want to be able to print from either one, without messing with Ethernet (for when we are in the RV).

Just got a Trendnet wireless print server (for our USB HP printer).

Works OK with the Ethernet, but get a funny error msg about DNS (something or other) when we try to "connect" to the print server from a laptop.

Sure would appreciate some advise for this seemingly mentally challenged old fart.

Thanks,
s/Mike
 
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Old 03-29-08, 08:49 PM
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Short answer, no.

You need a switch, aka router.
 
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Old 03-30-08, 07:31 AM
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You need a switch, aka router.
not AKA
switch and routers are two separate animals

consumer grade routers generally have built in switch's but routers are not switch's and switch's are not routers

I have Cisco routers here with no switch capability's and lots of switchs with no router capability's

We have two laptops with wifi capability and want to be able to print from either one, without messing with Ethernet
to use a network device (print server ) you connect with Ethernet (just wireless vs wired )

a cheap wireless router with a built in switch would be the most cost effective solution you don't need to use the WAN portion
 
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Old 03-30-08, 10:20 AM
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Ad Hoc is the way to go

There is an option in Windows XP that allows you to create an "ad-hoc" network between wireless devices. This means you do not need to have a router/switch. If you can create an "ad-hoc" network and then manually configure the print server to have an address in the same network, then the answer is "You can do what you want to do without any other devices".

Do this:
1. Determine if you can configure the Trendnet manually. (unusual if you can't)
2. Google "ad-hoc networking" and look at the articles on how to setup an ad-hoc network.

Hope this helps.
 
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Old 03-30-08, 06:22 PM
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thanks for the hint about ad-hoc networking.
gonna go give it a try.

Thanks again,
s/Mike
 
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Old 03-31-08, 10:45 PM
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Here is a quote from the Trendnet Print Server guide:

TEW-P1PG is a print server that transforms virtually any stand-alone
Parallel printer into a shared network printer. The TEW-P1PG
provides IEEE 802.11g 54Mbps wireless interface for integrating into
existing wireless network.
The TEW-P1PG is designed for printers
equipped with parallel compliant printer port and it is an ideal network
solution to convert conventional parallel printer into a shared resource
on the network.
 
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Old 04-01-08, 08:16 AM
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Find IP address info

Look in the manual and find TrendNet's tech support number. Call them and ask them to help you give the print server an IP address in the same network as your computers. Have you been able to set your computers up in an ad hoc network and see each other? This may take some help from a computer person.

You need for the print server to be able to be configured manually with an ip address. If it can't be configured manually, ask if it has a default ip address and what is it. Then you can use it, but you will have to change the ip addresses of your laptops to be in the same network. An example of addresses in the same network would be:

192.168.1.1 (your laptop)
192.168.1.2 (friend's laptop)
192.168.1.3 (printer)
(All of these have a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0)

The first three numbers here are the Network ID. The last is the host ID. You will need to be sure that the computers have the same network id, but have unique host id's.

If you are still with me on this, notice the subnet mask. It is actually a number that is paired with the IP address to tell you what the Network ID and host ID are. Everywhere there is a 255 in the subnetmask, the number in the IP address is part of the network id. You could pick any number you want to below 255 in your IP address as long as the numbers of the network id match and the host id DON'T match. Stay away from using 127, it is reserved.

Hope this helps.
 
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