Installing DSL

Reply

  #1  
Old 11-13-08, 07:40 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 30
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Installing DSL

I'm getting ready to install DSL in my condo, and could use some help with the wiring. The condo was prewired for a home network, so all the "telephone" cords wired through the house are actually cat5e cables, including the incoming line. When I moved in all the jacks were wired to panel in the utility room. All the jacks were wired how they were supposed to be (the colors of the wires matched the colors on the board), however the incoming line was different. It had the blue and blue/white wires spliced into the orange and orange/white wires of one of the jacks. At the time when I switched everything over to actually set up the home network, I didn't anticipate on ever having phone service so I just terminated the incoming line into one of the empty jacks on the patch panel. Well now I'm needing to install DSL, and I need to know how to wire the incoming line in order to have it work correctly. I'd like to still wire it to an empty jack in the patch panel, then hook the standard telephone line into this jack and run that cord to the modem. What I'm not sure of is how to wire that jack. Right now it's wired like all the other cables (blue to blue, blue/white to blue/white, etc...) however since it originally had the blue spliced into the orange, I'm not sure what to do. Hopefuly some of this makes sense, and hopefully someone can help me out.

Thanks in advance.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 11-13-08, 10:31 AM
JoeTheZombie's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Idaho
Posts: 216
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Typically, the DSL modem will expect the signal to be on the center two pins. If it is an RJ-11 jack, that's pins 2-3. If it is an RJ-45 jack, pins 4-5.

Often times, we don't know what color pair the phone company used to connect, so we have to look in the NID (box on the house where the wires terminate) and see which ones are hooked up. Just make sure these wires are on the center pins of the jack, then use a regular phone cord to connect the DSL modem to the jack.

There are lots and lots of compounding issues with DSL, especially if you are planning on sharing the connection with multiple computers.

Does your DSL have voice service?
Do you have more than one computer?
Are the jacks in the rooms RJ-11 or RJ-45?
Are you using wireless technology?
Do you have an existing network?
Do you have a security system?
 
  #3  
Old 11-13-08, 10:35 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 30
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
No voice service, it's a dry loop dsl account
The modem will be hooked up to my router which will be sharing the internet connection throughout my condo.

What kinds of issues are you referring to?
 
  #4  
Old 11-13-08, 10:41 AM
JoeTheZombie's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Idaho
Posts: 216
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Not so much if you're not trying to push voice or a security system around as well. The problem is if these asets are in place, we have to worry about RJ-31X jacks, filters, and running out of wire pairs in the existing wiring.

It sounds like those concerns don't apply in your situation, so as long as the incoming service is on the center two pins of your jack, you won't have a problem.
 
  #5  
Old 11-13-08, 02:41 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 30
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Here's a photo showing how everything was originally wired. Notice the incoming line has the blue wires spliced into the orange wires. It looks like the orange wires are pins 3-4. Should I put the blue wire there or in pins 5-6 like you suggested?

http://i33.************/2relaup.jpg

for some reason I can't post a link to the picture, but if you replace the *'s with "tinypic" then you'll be able to see it.
 
  #6  
Old 11-13-08, 05:31 PM
JoeTheZombie's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Idaho
Posts: 216
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
It was probably that way to deliver the dialtone from the telco coming in on the blue pair to the jack that the orange pair goes to. That would be where the phone was located.

I'm not sure why they did it like that, because it is flaky and will eventually fail.

What you have there is a telephone distribution module hub, and will not work for a data network. Basically, block "0" is the input. The wire coming from telco should land there. The rest of the blocks would then deliver what is coming from telco to each of the jacks those blocks service. What they did was effectively bypass the distribution module and only deliver service to the jack the orange pair is connected to.

The bad news is you can not run a data network off that telephone distribution hub. You'll need to either crimp RJ-45 connectors on the ends of the blue cables and plug them directly in to your router/switch, or install an RJ-45 patch panel and use network cables to go between your router/swtich and the patch panel. In either case, the wiring must be done according to the 568A or 568B standard. The standard must be the same at both the jack, and at the patch panel (or connectors if you choose that route). You'll need the proper punch-down tools or crimpers.

You also need to make sure the jacks in the rooms are indeed RJ45 jacks. Because of the use of the telephone distribution hub, I'd hazard a guess that your jacks are actually CAT3 style and are of the 3-line voice grade variety.

The good news is we know with some degree of certainty that the telco will deliver the DSL on the blue pair coming from telco, since that is what was used previously. You can buy a regular RJ-11 jack and land the blue pair on the center pins of the jack (red and green), then use a regular telephone cord to connect the DSL modem to the jack. If your DSL modem has a built in multi-port switch/hub, then you could just connect your rooms to that.
 
  #7  
Old 11-13-08, 05:46 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 30
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The picture I posted is what the wiring looked like BEFORE I finished the home network wiring. I've since added a patch panel and now all of the wires terminate into the panel and each have a rj45 jack. The home network is taken care of and works just fine. The only thing left I need to do is figure out exactly which pins I need to attach the blue wires of the incoming line to in order to get the DSL service to work when it gets turned on.
 
  #8  
Old 11-13-08, 06:03 PM
JoeTheZombie's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Idaho
Posts: 216
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Excellent. Your DSL modem will expect the signal to be on the center 2 pins of your jack.
 
  #9  
Old 11-13-08, 06:04 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 30
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Your comment about 568A or 568B got me thinking, and I want to run something by you. I know all the jacks in the condo are wired as 568B. When I installed the patch panel all the pins were color coded without any option for 568A or B. At the time I didn't think anything of it and simply matched up the colors. It seems to have worked because the home network has been up and running successfully for a month or so now. Since it's working can I assume the wiring was done correctly? I'm just wondering now since I didn't have two wiring options on the patch panel like I did on the jacks. On the jacks there were wiring diagrams for both 568A and 568B, and whoever did the initial wiring did them all as 568B. I'm now wondering if, since that's the case, I should of done something different when wiring the patch panel than simply mathching up the colors.

I apologize for my ignorance on this, I'm still learning about all this.

Also, still in regards to the DSL wiring, I have one last question. The pin layout for my RJ45 patch panel looks the same as the one in the picture above. The colors go blue, orange, green, brown. That order does not match up with either the 568A or 568B standard. When you say I should hook the wires to the center pins, do you mean the center pins according to the 568a/b standards (which would be blue) or the center pins on how the patch panel would be laid out (which would be one green and one orange).
 
  #10  
Old 11-13-08, 06:17 PM
JoeTheZombie's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Idaho
Posts: 216
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
If it is working, then they are most likely OK. If you had 568A on one side, and 568B on the other, you would have created, in effect, crossover cables (typically used for interconnecting switches). However, now days a lot of the newer switches have auto-sensing jacks that correct the pinout on the fly. The only way to truly know for certain is to use tester. If your network is working well, I wouldn't give it second thought.

Some panels' color scheme do not match the standard, but are internally wired so that the end result is one of the standards. Lucky for us, both standards show the center pins as 4-5, and are blue. So just punch down on blue and you *should* be good to go.
 
  #11  
Old 11-13-08, 06:21 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 30
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
the network is definitely working, so I guess I won't worry about it. Now you said the incoming line (blue wires) should be hooked up to pins 4-5, which according to both 568A & B are the blue wires, I should already be fine. As I mentioned I had already terminated the incoming line to one of the RJ45 jacks in the patch panel, so it should already be hooked up how I need it right?
 
  #12  
Old 11-13-08, 06:23 PM
JoeTheZombie's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Idaho
Posts: 216
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I think I was editing while your were replying, and then the server disconnected me. Anyway, yes... just punch down on blue and you should be good to go.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: