saving energy

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Old 11-15-08, 03:24 PM
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saving energy

Can i safely turn off a protected power strip that has a computer,printer,scanner, and phone modem, overnight to save energy?
 
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Old 11-15-08, 03:55 PM
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Yes, provided the switch is rated for the total power that's plugged into the strip. Most are 15 amps, and the devices you mentioned typically come in under that.
 
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Old 11-15-08, 03:58 PM
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Safely? Sure why not? Turn off the PC, printer, and scanner first so thay can do their normal shutdown.

But if its a real Power Strip, it's not going to really save much except for that tiny amount if you have a illuminated on/off switch.

The best thing, if it's actually a surge suppressor of some sort, is to unplug it after shutting things down.
 
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Old 11-16-08, 08:45 AM
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Thank you Gentlemen for the replies.
 
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Old 11-16-08, 11:15 AM
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That's a great idea---your phone will not work----
I think I will do that.............................................
 
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Old 11-16-08, 11:22 AM
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The modem that my computer is on a separate phone line. Shutting off the modem has no effect on the other lines.
 
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Old 11-16-08, 01:12 PM
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I have a switch that kills the cable phone----it was used a lot during election-
 
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Old 11-17-08, 03:07 AM
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When electronic devices shut down they don't actually power off completely. They continue to draw a small percentage of power for the transformers. In the case of remote-controlled devices they also constantly power the sensor circuits.

Taken individually you wouldn't save much -- if anything noticeable -- by unplugging one device. However, if you consider how many transformer-powered devices you have in a typical home the numbers can add up. The problem there is, you have to manually switch off power strips or unplug every device in the house when you're finished using them.

On the other hand is the argument that claims turn-on surges can shorten the life of a power supply, and it's best to let the device handle its own power cycles.

My experience hasn't shown any real advantage or downside to either method, especially in terms of saving a few cents.

The real benefit comes from the collective savings on a global scale: If everyone powered-off all unused devices, how much less electricity would need to be generated? Daswede, if that's what you meant in the subject line by saving energy instead of saving money, you're doing a good thing.
 
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Old 02-25-13, 01:36 AM
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I have also heard of power strips that have remote controls so you can turn a tvs power supply off remotely rather than have to try to find the power switch each time you turn the power off. One I found on Amazon.com works wireless so you don't need to aim the remote at the power strip here is the link to that Amazon.com: Belkin Conserve Switch Energy-Saving Surge Protector with Remote: Electronics . I don't know much about it except it is a bit more expensive than most power strips. It looks like a good power strip for those hard to reach places but you never know.
 
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Old 02-25-13, 06:29 AM
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"Phantom power" is a phenomenon invented and publicized by the companies that make power strips in an attempt to boost sales. You will never recover what you spend on the power strip. Basically you are spending $40 to save 50 cents a year. Save your money.
 
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Old 02-25-13, 06:38 AM
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But, IMO, if you already spent the $40, you may as well turn it off to save the 50. That said, my computer is on a power strip and I never turn it off, I'm just not going to crawl under the desk to do that.
 
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Old 02-25-13, 12:06 PM
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I agree with you Jersey Matt and Mitch17 I actually would probably never buy a power strip like that. As to savings it might save someone money over time and eventually pay for itself. I thought I would point it out though in case he was serious about turning his power strip off. I can get to my power strips but at one time they were buried under papers and very hard to get to not to mention it being a bad idea being under all of those papers.
 
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Old 02-25-13, 01:04 PM
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This is a necro-thread bumped by a spammer.. The post you replied to is gone..
 
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Old 02-25-13, 01:31 PM
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Phantom power IS very real...to the utilities that have to service tens, or hundreds of thousands of units owned by all their customers. In a single residence phantom power is negligible. I totaled up all the phantom power in my home, cell phone charger, wireless telephone charger, clocks on various appliances, standby power on computers and entertainment devices and the like and then multiplied by the cost of my power and for an entire year it comes to less than ten dollars, maybe considerably less as I don't remember the exact figures. My cell phone charger alone was about five cents a year. Considering the inconvenience of turning things completely off and on, often requiring unplugging and replugging, the actions are absolutely ludicrous in any effort to save money on your utility bill.

Remember, if you have any kind of video recorder that you use to record programs unattended you MUST leave these powered at all times and include any powered units (antennas, cable converters and the like) that are necessary for the recorder to operate.

If you have any AC powered analog clocks then dumping them in favor of electronic digital clocks will save you more money than will the silly manual or automatic switched power strips.
 
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