broadband internet speed

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Old 12-30-08, 10:41 PM
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broadband internet speed

I'm paying my ISP for "1 meg" "high speed" internet service. I checked my actual download speed at one of those testing sites and it read 1297 kbps download speed, which I think is somewhat higher than 1 meg. Why is it that I get somewhat higher than the 1 meg I'm paying for? Does it fluctuate or something? Just wondering...
 
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Old 12-31-08, 12:16 AM
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Some ISP's have a timed boost for when you go on-line.
After that it throttles back.

Another possibility is that there aren't many people sharing the line. With cable internet, the more people using it at the same time can cause your connection to be much slower.

On those speed tests, try different places. You will notice that your speed will differ. Here's a site that I have done some testing:
Speedtest.net - The Global Broadband Speed Test
 
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Old 12-31-08, 08:45 AM
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My internet connection isn't cable, it's DSL. Download speed test results show higher than 1 meg regardless of how long I've been online, doesn't seem to be throttling back at any time. I tried different places on speedtest.net and download speed from most everywhere shows over 1 meg.
This is fine of course that it goes faster than the speed I'm subscribed to. I suppose my ISP sets it a little on the high side somehow and it isn't really an operation that can be that precisely controlled.
 
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Old 12-31-08, 01:49 PM
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I don't know that the following applies to a DSL setup since, I believe, the media is not shared the way a cable setup is, but here's what I was told by a Comcast representative I had to call to register a new modem recently (paraphrasing): "Though you are paying for X mbps and our routers are using QoS (Quality of Service) to shape the traffic as such, in times when the demand on our network is low, our routers may arbitrarily apportioned more bandwidth to your account." Then, who knows how tight their QoS algorithm is.

Regarding the "boost" feature that rbwest mentioned, in the Comcast case, they are supposedly able to tell that you're downloading a large file (I think they said >5MB) and temporarily give you more bandwidth to complete said download quicker. This would not kick in during typical web surfing, IM, email, etc. I haven't looked for information on how often this would apply during any given period of time.

best,
JP
 
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Old 12-31-08, 02:23 PM
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When it comes to DSL, the closer you are to the hub, the faster your connection speed will be. So, it could be that you are very close to the hub and the DSL speeds are faster because those customers at the "end of the line" or farther away are guaranteed 1MB as well and the signal will need to be higher at the output to achieve a higher speed for the farther customers. Does that make sense?
 
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Old 01-01-09, 10:58 AM
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Okay, thanks for those helpful replies. and happy New Year.
 
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