Computer Command

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Old 02-10-09, 05:44 AM
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Computer Command

I have a Dell PC and I am trying to determine what I have in there RAM (type and amount). I believe there is a command I could enter which would give me that info, I did a search but did not come up with it.

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Old 02-10-09, 06:22 AM
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Ram

Go to Explorer > Desktop>My Computer>Right Click>Properties>General
 
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Old 02-10-09, 06:59 AM
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Thanks, that tells me i have 512 but I want to know what kind and if there are slots to add more.

Thanks
 
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Old 02-10-09, 07:11 AM
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Well, any of the memory sellers have places on their websites that will tell you. Best Buy, crucial.com, Kingston.com, etc

You may need to know you complete model number. There was one that will actually scan your PC, but I'm not sure what it is.

There is plenty of software out there that will do it...but I'm not sure if Windows or Vista has it built in.
 
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Old 02-10-09, 07:15 AM
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Crucial will scan your computer and give you all the info you need.
 
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Old 02-11-09, 07:44 PM
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Try CPU-Z

The program CPU-Z will ID the motherboard, GPU,CPU and Ram and it will even tell you how many ram slots you have

CPUID
 
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Old 02-11-09, 08:26 PM
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if you plan on upgrading your memory, it is good practice to open up the case beforehand and physically identify if you have open slots or if your current rams are a matched pair. their should be markings/label with ram info on them.

with the power off (powercord still plugged in), practice removing and placing back the current ram sticks. be sure to touch the metal case with a finger numberous times to discharge static off your body prior to touching the ram sticks/motherboard.

-a|ex
 
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Old 02-12-09, 06:14 AM
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Originally Posted by Devine Shadow View Post
with the power off (powercord still plugged in)
Why are you saying to leave the power cord plugged in? There's still power to components in the case that way.
 
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Old 02-12-09, 03:12 PM
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Originally Posted by chandltp View Post
Why are you saying to leave the power cord plugged in? There's still power to components in the case that way.
if it's unplugged, you will not discharge the static in your body.
it's a polarized plug, no worries with stray current.

you can unplug it, just remember to touch the closest wall outlet screw to discharge the static in your body. walking on the carpet will generate enough static to destroy microcircuits.

btw, there's no power to the components, but some motherboards have a powersupply light that stays on.



-a|ex
 
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Old 02-12-09, 05:50 PM
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Hi smallengineguy,

Dell has a tutorial and online tool to identify and eventually upgrade the memory

Or, if you prefer, in your computer click--> Start (bottom left)--> All Programs--> Dell Support--> Support--> Support (again) --> System information--> More information
 
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Old 02-13-09, 06:33 AM
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Originally Posted by Devine Shadow View Post
if it's unplugged, you will not discharge the static in your body.
Agreed. But then again, you only need to be at the same potential as the case.

Originally Posted by Devine Shadow View Post
btw, there's no power to the components, but some motherboards have a powersupply light that stays on.
As long as you don't accidentally turn it on.

I've never toasted a component with static electricity, as long as I maintain contact with the case. I always use a wrist strap if I'm dealing with expensive components.
 
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