laptop internal hard drive

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  #1  
Old 03-29-09, 09:14 PM
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laptop internal hard drive

I'm wondering if any 2.5 inch internal hard drive will fit. I'm a bit of a computer idiot so be easy.
I ask because last week my laptop made a clicking noise when I tunrned it on then said no bootable device. A guy at work restarted it in safe mode and it was fine for a day but after that it has acted up again.
At this time I have a 100gb hard drive and was looking at a 160gb seagate. The computer is a compaq c700 if that helps.
Thanks for any help.
 
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  #2  
Old 03-30-09, 03:24 PM
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the size is not a problem but the type of drive it is could make a difference. Drives come in 2 major types : Pata (also called IDE) and SATA (dont have another name I know of).

If this is really old, it may be PATA.

To find out you can use a free program such as Belarc Advisor (from their website) which takes a few minutes but tells you all kinds of neat stuff about your PC:

Belarc Advisor - Free Personal PC Audit
 
  #3  
Old 03-30-09, 08:12 PM
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Thank you captain.
I ran it and am amazed it can tell all that info most of it I have know idea what it is but it's cool to look at. It says I have a fujitsu mhy2120bh hard drive. The computer is about 1 year old so I'm assuming it's the sata.

Next question is what will a bigger hard drive do for me I'm using about 1/2 of the space now. I use the computer to hold music and to surf the web but that's about it.
 
  #4  
Old 03-30-09, 08:12 PM
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Try this site for specs on your computer model and some upgrades.

Buy Hard Drive, Laptop Hard Drives, Notebook Hard Drives, Data Recovery at DriveSolutions.com
 
  #5  
Old 03-30-09, 08:45 PM
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Thanks Crabbyman. I have a sata. I've learned more this week about computers than I ever expected I would. This being my first computer I'm amazed how much I use it and how I feel like I'm lost without it. A year ago I would use it to look on the auction site and check e mail about once a week, now I spend at least 1-2hours a night. And I can type with 6 of my fingers!


Any idea of what the model numbers mean mhy,mhw,mhz?
Thanks again.
 

Last edited by samuari; 03-30-09 at 08:53 PM. Reason: adding info
  #6  
Old 03-30-09, 09:58 PM
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You are correct that it is indeed a SATA drive. You should be able to remove the sled that holds the drive and replace it with any other model SATA drive 2.5". Check with the manufacturers home/support page as a lot of them now show you how to change the hard drive out.

Your specs are:

120 GB (how much size there is. you are using roughly 60GB)
5400 RPM (basically, speed)


You can get a larger or faster hard drive but you may not need a lot of extra muscle. Since this is a year or so old as you stated, make sure its not covered by warranty first.

However, before you do much else. BACK up your data as soon as you can. If your hard drive is dying then its critical to get a copy of everything while you can.

Look for a new SATA 2.5" of at least 5400 RPM and 120 GB (more of either is fine, too).

A faster drive would speed some things up but creates more heat which can shorten the lifespan of the computer, and ironically, slow it down, too.

A larger drive would just give you more space but of course cost more.

Hope that all helps.
 
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Old 03-31-09, 05:06 PM
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Beer 4U2Thanks again, unfortunatly I traded this computer for a boat and after the deal was done I found out I didn't get the operating software and the guy wouldn't return my calls, well he didn't get a title for the boat after that.
Anyway I did buy a external hard drive to back everything up and have a new vista program on the way.
 
  #8  
Old 03-31-09, 05:22 PM
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Sounds like it was sort of resolved then, so best of luck with the Vista and let us know if you have further problems.
 
  #9  
Old 04-01-09, 04:47 AM
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Originally Posted by samuari View Post
This being my first computer I'm amazed how much I use it and how I feel like I'm lost without it. A year ago I would use it to look on the auction site and check e mail about once a week, now I spend at least 1-2 hours a night. And I can type with 6 of my fingers!
That's because you're now a moderator in the Marine forum! You have the big red DIY tat on your forehead!

Beer 4U2
 
  #10  
Old 04-01-09, 07:20 AM
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Originally Posted by TheCaptain View Post

You can get a larger or faster hard drive but you may not need a lot of extra muscle. Since this is a year or so old as you stated, make sure its not covered by warranty first.
If he bought the PC a year ago, the hard drive may be warrantied. But drives in pre-built systems tend to be OEM and don't carry the same warranty of a store bought retail boxed drive.

However, before you do much else. BACK up your data as soon as you can. If your hard drive is dying then its critical to get a copy of everything while you can.
Yep. Get your data off ASAP using Acronis True Image (free trial). The clicking you heard is what drives do just before they die.

Look for a new SATA 2.5" of at least 5400 RPM and 120 GB (more of either is fine, too).
Go with a new 2.5" SATA 5400 rpm or better yet, a 7200 rpm drive. The HDD is the #1 bottleneck component, so you'd really see a speed boost.

btw... buy a Western Digital Scorpio Black Series w/the integrated fall-sensor.

A faster drive would speed some things up but creates more heat which can shorten the lifespan of the computer, and ironically, slow it down, too.
While it's common knowlege that heat lowers components lifespans, i've yet to see much proof of substantial life shortening. I've ran my Intel Q6600 quad core for 2 years straight, 24/7 @ 3.6ghz (stock is 2.4ghz) and zero problems. I haven't turned off my two 10,000 rpm Raptor drives in 4 years except to reboot.

btw.... since when does heat slow a PC down? (other than when a CPU hits 85'c and throttles itself to prevent a meltdown)


A larger drive would just give you more space but of course cost more.

Hope that all helps.
320gb WD 7200 RPM Black Series 16mb cache = $89 @ newegg.com
 
  #11  
Old 04-01-09, 05:37 PM
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Life was easier last week when I thought this thing worked on magic smoke.
What is a fall sensor?
 
  #12  
Old 04-01-09, 09:19 PM
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Originally Posted by samuari View Post
Life was easier last week when I thought this thing worked on magic smoke.
What is a fall sensor?
It's a little sensor inside many new notebook hard drives which have the ability to detect if your notebook falls off a table, etc. It automatically returns the hard drive disc armature to the "off disc" location so it does not hit the internal disc platters.
 
  #13  
Old 04-02-09, 05:35 PM
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LB:

a cpu can be throttled down in response to high heat as can other components. Speed is one of the few things limiting chip speed.
 
  #14  
Old 04-04-09, 08:46 AM
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Originally Posted by TheCaptain View Post
LB:

a cpu can be throttled down in response to high heat as can other components. Speed is one of the few things limiting chip speed.
Yes, most new computers have features which throttle down the CPU's speed if the processor's cooling setup cannot keep the chips temperature within reasonable levels. The only notebooks I've seen this occur on were some of the HP Pavilions like the ZV5000(?) series that had older AMD processors. Almost always, the cooling heatsink and fan is designed to not let the processors heat get out of check, but like stated earlier.... dust, blocked intakes/exhaust ports, loose CPU cooler, etc can all cause processors to overheat.

The CPU temps in my new Dell XPS m1530 dropped about 8'c on average while under load due to simply getting rid of the thermal grease and use Arctic Silver 5 thermal compound. A good dusting also does wonders. Just keep in mind, those cans of air PC stores sell not only cost a lot, but they don't have that much power. I tend to take both my laptop and desktop workstation down into my garage and blow them out with 140psi of super powerful air via my 26 gallon Craftsman air compressor. (and yes... i have an extensive air drying/filtering system attached so no moisture gets into my computers).
 
  #15  
Old 04-24-09, 09:52 PM
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Just a update and a Thank you to all that replied.
I did buy a 250 gb 7200 rpm wd hard drive, I as most men wanted to upgrade performance even if I never use it. I was wating for my operating software and the old hard drive was working untill last weekend then it locked up and wouldn't do anything. I recieved my new vista discs yesterday and went to it got the new hard drive in and vista loaded. My first computer repair wehe. Thanks again.
 
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