"Wired" Networks - Questions

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Old 11-01-09, 11:03 AM
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"Wired" Networks - Questions

I need to temporarily add Internet access for an additional computer at a relative's house. They have a broadband cable modem. It doesn't justify the time or expense of setting up a wireless network, and I've never worked with switches. A few questions...

1) If I pick up something like the Linksys EZXS55W switch and use patch cords from the modem to the switch, and then more patch cords to the two PC's, will that provide Internet access to both computers?

2) Will this require software install or simply hook it up and go?

3) They are considering changing from cable to DSL broadband. Should the switch work with either?

Thanks for your help.
 
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Old 11-01-09, 11:26 AM
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Yep...it will work fine....shouldn't need any setup...as you said..should be plug and go. The output of the modem to the input of the switch. Should work with either modem.

I still don't really know the diff between a router and a switch, seems like they do the same thing....one of the Pro's may explain further.
 
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Old 11-01-09, 12:03 PM
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Hold it, you may need a router. It all depends upon your ISP and your cable or DSL modem.

In most cases you will be assigned ONE real IP address by the ISP. If you try to use a switch to connect two computers, you may find that only one computer can be on at a time. Each computer needs it's own IP address.

A typical home router will use what is called NAT or Network Address Translation. It takes that one real IP and translates it into another range of addresses, typically 192.168.x.x These addresses won't work in the "real" internet but your router handles all the translation.

Most routers include a switch. It's more efficient than a hub as it only allows packets (data) to go where it needs to go. In other words, in a hub everybody gets it, in a switch only the guy that needs it gets it. It reduces collisions and improves performance.

You need to check with the ISP as to what you need. In most cases, you'll need a router. There is another advantage, it gives you a level of security by "hiding" your own internal network from the real internet.

Hope that helps. Let me know if you have more questions.
 
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Old 11-01-09, 12:09 PM
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Ahhh see....maybe I'll just shut up now...lol.

No I won't....

You can probably find a router about as cheap as the switch..and still no real setup required. Just in case they wanted it later..you could buy a wireless router and disable the wireless..just use the wired ports that almost all have. I've seen brand name wireless routers for around $30 on sale.
 
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Old 11-01-09, 01:54 PM
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Well bummer... It was worth a shot. Yeah, I think I'll just pick up a wireless router and plug into it. Thanks for everybody's feedback.
 
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Old 11-01-09, 02:19 PM
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Yeah, you can get a router and disable the wireless portion. There will be some configuration, you will need to tell it what type of internet connection you have at a minimum and assign any passwords if necessary. If you set it up for wireless you'll have more to configure.

Hope it helps.
 
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