Building a PC

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Old 07-13-10, 07:25 AM
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Building a PC

Considering building my own desktop PC

Is this cost effective and relatively uncomplicated?
 
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Old 07-13-10, 07:50 AM
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Pc

Not necessarily cost effective. A great way to learn what components are necessary. Requires lots of research unless you are a computer tech.
 

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Old 07-13-10, 09:43 AM
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All my computers have been home made, often part road kill others threw away. Other parts were last years latest and greatest bout on Ebay from over stocked suppliers. I never spent over $300 and usually less.

I'd never buy a factory. Of course part of the problems with most of the factory ones is they come with Windows, the only operating system that is prone to viruses and malwear. If you can use an erector set you can build a computer. Just buy the individual parts and plug them in.
 
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Old 07-13-10, 10:43 AM
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If you buy new parts, figure it will cost more than buying something already built

That said, it will be exactly what you want and no doubt about the quality of any of the parts
 
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Old 07-13-10, 01:30 PM
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This is were you'll have to learn basic stuff like bus width, bus speed, etc. So that everything works at the same speed and your not accidentily paying lots of money for ...let's say a fast video card that's bottle-necked by a slow memory chip or mistaking a card with lots of slow memory for performance gain. Just know the basics and consider compatibility since you might as well make it worth the effort. You'll also be in a position to choose your own OS.

So if your entertaining the notion, look at a book first and see what you think.
 
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Old 07-13-10, 03:53 PM
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Honestly probably never learned the basics, never read a book. It's not really as hard as it sounds.

Ebay and Google has always been my guide.

[a] Find a few mother boards you can afford on Ebay.

[b] Check out the price for CPUs on Ebay that fit those mother boards.

[c] Google the mother boards. Your looking mainly for independent negative info on the boards.

[d] When you find a MB and CPU you can afford look for cases you can afford that the MB will fit. The larger the case the easier to work in. Cheap cases are mainly cheap because of the power supply. No need to spend a lot. You can always replace the power supply later if needed with a better power supply. The main thing is the power supply should be rated at least 100 watts more the minimum for the MB.

[e] Memory is the only thing you don't want to cheap out on. Go to Crucial and buy the recommended memory. Now days at least 1 gig.

[f] You will need one or more hard drive. Find a 100 Gb are larger you can afford on Ebay. I recommend SATA. I have had good luck with used drives but if you can afford it buy new. If friends have junk computers you may be able to use the HDs from them,

[g] Floppy and CD drives are legacy technology unless you have a special need I'd just skip those. Buy a cheap DVD drive that gets good reviews when you Google. Again Ebay will be a good source. Find what you can afford then Google to see if it has problems.

[Purchase Note] Both Newegg and Tiger Direct are good sources and products have readers opinions. From reading them it is apparent they aren't censoring bad reviews.

[H} Even if the MB has built in video you are better off using a video card. See what fits your board, look for ones you can afford then Google to check quality.

It usually takes me a couple of months to buy parts. I spend a lot of time on Ebay looking at what is available, Goggling my choices, then bidding at prices I can afford. J-bid is excellent free software for sniping an auction just a few seconds before it closes.

Finally there is the operating system you install. You can spend a couple of hundreds of dollars on Windows and worry about viruses or use one of the easy free versions of Linux that are not prone to viruses or malware.

Of course you can also buy a "bare bones" unit and save a lot of the work. It will all ready have a mother board installed in a case and have a CPU installed. You just add memory, drives, and cards of your choice.
 
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Old 07-13-10, 09:54 PM
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cost verse speed

it depends on what you intend the desktop to do

I have built mine for 10 plus years
back when 486-66 was da bomb CPU
for me cost was never and issue
control, speed and power was / is

my 1st factory computer was a disappointment in the "upgrade" path
so I ended up dumping it, keeping only the CPU and mem, drives and rebuilding.

only in laptops is whee you choices become fixed ( and even then you can customized them or build them if you really got the know how )

desktop can be built frugally for simply needs ( web )
or loaded up for heavy lifting ( gaming, video editing )

like the old auto saying, speed cost money, how fast do you want to go?
 
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Old 07-14-10, 07:34 AM
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Thanks for all the feedback. Sounds like a fun project that could be relatively inexpensive.

I don't have a need for gaming or hightech editing items. Mostly for MS office and web.

I will do some research and see how it goes. I have found Newegg to be a great resource. In fact, I just purchased a external hard drive from them last night.
 
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Old 07-14-10, 09:13 AM
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Tigerdirect is also a good source for pc parts. I think they're a little cheaper than Newegg but some of our kids swear by Newegg and they know a LOT more about pc's than me.
 
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Old 07-14-10, 12:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Stumped1 View Post
I don't have a need for gaming or hightech editing items. Mostly for MS office and web.
Consider a Mini ITX Atom based system then.

You can likely build one for well under $500, and it will save in energy consumption. I use an Atom based netbook, and it does fine for those tasks, except for playing high end video. It does all it can to play regular SD video. Some Atom boards have video chipsets with video decoding assist though.
 
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Old 07-14-10, 08:42 PM
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RAY-could you talk a bit more about O/S other than 'windows'??
I did't know they exist!
 

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Old 07-14-10, 09:22 PM
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Originally Posted by newtofta View Post
RAY-could you talk a bit more about O/S other than 'windows'??
I did't know they exist!
That is because Microsot ads lead you to believe a PC is Windows. It isn't. PC simply means "Personal Computer" it isn't a paticular type of oprating system. Actually even a Mac is a PC.

The various flavors of Linux are the main ones besides Mac but there is also BSD. There are perhaps two hundred or more flavors of Linux but maybe 10 major ones. Three of which are commercial and have both free and pay versions. Almost all the rest are free only.

I use PCLinuxOS. It is very complete and easy to use with great user support. You can test it and many other versions of Linux by running it as a live CD. Try Googeling Linux and you will come up with thousands of hits. You might want to start by going to Built Penguin Tough PCLinuxOS and reading a bit. You can download an iso file to make a live CD. I suggest you start with the full KDE version.
 
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Old 07-15-10, 06:57 AM
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Lots of flavors of Linux is right and a lot of people like one a lot more than another, so trying different ones you can run from a disc is a good way to start
 
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Old 07-15-10, 08:10 AM
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I build all my own systems. Cost effective?? Depends. I build my systems the way I want with none of the other crap that comes with prebuilt systems like speakers, unneeded water cooling, and software I never use.
I also keep upgrading in mind. For instance the Mobo I'm looking at have 6 GB/s SATA and 3.0 USB None of which I have but it will come in handy in the future.
I build my systems for gaming in mind so you know it will have high end graphics
Here my future system as it stands now:
Asus P7P55D-E PRO
Intel i7 860 1165
Corsair 850TX PSU
Radeon HD 5850 Turbo or Nvidia GTX 465/470
4GB (2x2GB) DDR3 ram
 
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Old 07-15-10, 09:45 PM
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wasser boxer

Originally Posted by Tolyn Ironhand View Post
unneeded water cooling,
unneeded? i have never seen that as standard unless it's gaming..and even then high end

but my last, rig, which was a gaming ( and still is with the i5 in there ) is water cooled, for one reason, it's quiet.

I cannot stand fans kicking in, especially now with the onset of summer temps, though I need a new water block for the i5 since the last one was was for my mighty amd 4400+, but other than my nvidia 9750 sli and my PPC PSU, there are no case fans as I am using a totally passive radiator
 
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Old 07-27-10, 12:03 AM
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Originally Posted by Stumped1 View Post
Considering building my own desktop PC

Is this cost effective and relatively uncomplicated?
Building a desktop for the first time can be very exciting and frustrating. What I would recommend for a beginner is buy a complete barebones kit from tigerdirect or newegg. All of the parts will ship un-assembled, but you will know all of the parts are compatible.

Beyond that it's not overly difficult, and there are a million guides and message boards online (just like this one!) to help you along the way.

As far as cost effectiveness goes, it can be if you find a good deal. But desktop prices have gone down significantly, so you can usually find an adequate desktop for a few hundred. If you are a gaming enthusiast or have a very specific need building would also be a good idea.

Honestly building your own is usually more cost effective because people just pirate all of the software (OS, antivirus, office, etc) that would usually come bundled with a purchased computer. That knocks off anywhere from 99 to a few hundred dollars.
 
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Old 07-27-10, 12:40 AM
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Honestly building your own is usually more cost effective because people just pirate all of the software (OS, antivirus, office, etc) that would usually come bundled with a purchased computer. That knocks off anywhere from 99 to a few hundred dollars.
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Or you can just do it legally and use Linux where the OS and all the software are free. That has the advantage too in that you can buy last years hardware cheap at close out sales and get the same performance as if you bought this years hardware and used Windows.
 
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Old 07-27-10, 06:22 PM
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Originally Posted by ray2047 View Post
Or you can just do it legally and use Linux where the OS and all the software are free. That has the advantage too in that you can buy last years hardware cheap at close out sales and get the same performance as if you bought this years hardware and used Windows.
Very good point, there are definitely a lot of free open source options out there. If you were gonna go the Linux route I'd suggest giving Ubuntu a look, it's one of the most user friendly Linux distros out there.

OP-If you wanna mention a budget and what you'd like to do with the computer I could suggest some hardware.
 
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Old 07-27-10, 07:09 PM
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Ubuntu is like Firefox it gets all the press but there are other options which may work better for you.
 
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Old 08-19-10, 06:46 AM
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If you just want a middle of the road computer that will surf the internet and all new games at medium graphics setting, you can't beat the price of a pre-built, but if you want a higher end computer for max graphics and big monitor or if you're outputting video to an HDTV or want ridiculous amounts of ram for google earth or audio/video editing or whatever reason, than it's cheaper to build yourself, but you will still pay more than a middle of the road pre-built.

Another reason to build is a lot of pre-builts come with bios's that are locked and can't be overclocked. Building yourself gives you way more control over your system and allows it to perform equal to much more expensive LOCKED pre builts. overclocking may reduce the life expectancy of some components but their date-until-obsolete is very short anyway, and if you know how to monitor system temps and troubleshoot, if something does happen, by the time it happens, it's usually time for an upgrade anyway.

A great way to learn and get opinions on system builds is to pile a bunch of parts in your shopping cart or "add to wishlist" then you can get a link to your wish list and post it and everyone can look at all the parts you've chosen and tell you if any parts are missing or incompatible etc.
 
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