How do I tell what type of Video Card I need?

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Old 10-21-11, 11:22 PM
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I did a bit of checking and found a power supply manufacturer that does support JerseyMatts assertion that having a larger power supply as far as wattage is concerned will not harm your computer. So I owe you an apology I was wrong and you were right. That being said however there is a matter of compatibility. I say that because I tried puting in a much newer power supply into my old computer I had just bought at auction and the computer would never stay on. Something by the way that the power supply manufacturers representative said might also happen as he said there might not be any overheating but the computer would just start and then re-start over and over again which is what my old HP did. Of course it could have been the motherboards fault as it never worked right even with the old power supply it had in it and my newer power supply came from a system I had just built so I know it worked. So I will say that it is probably a mattter of how the power supplies are wired and not actually the wattage as I was lead to believe. Also a matter of voltage as some of the motherboards made for Dell or HP may need a different amount of voltage in some areas that is not to regular standards if you were to build your own computer.
 
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Old 10-22-11, 08:01 AM
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Well there are AT power supplies and the newer ATX power supplies and probably an older computer (+8 years) might not support ATX.

An AT power supply uses a regular on/off switch. One position it is on and the other off.

An ATX is always on. The power switch is a momentary contact switch that just sends a signal to activate the computer.
 
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Old 10-22-11, 01:35 PM
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Matt your logic is tortuous. If you use a bigger power supply like a smaller power supply that a system was built around, then sure, you won’t have a problem with the system. And obviously if you can get a good deal on a power supply that is at least adequate, then by all means use it. That all goes without saying.

But ask a manufacturer if you can change to a bigger (more watts) power supply for their system any rational human being would assume you want to use the extra watts. A rational person would assume that if you were going to put a larger power supply in the system, but not use the extra wattage, then you wouldn’t need to ask him about it in the first place?

In other words, there is no such thing as a sensible question such as :

“ can I use a 600w power supply on a 300w system if I only plan to use 300w or less?”

An intuitive grasp of the obvious would say yes. No one was asking that question? I don’t think any manufacturer would assume that was your real question.

I think if a manufacturer said “sure you can put in a larger power supply, but just don’t use the extra capability” – that would be taken as a very sarcastic answer, never mind the ethics of an answer like that.

Putting in a larger power supply but for future expansion doesn’t change the question? It only postpones it. Either you can use the larger supply or you cannot.

Yes I know that people who sell power supplies encourage you to “upgrade” to a higher wattage power supply, pointing out that you only draw what you need (wow, what a revelation!) , and you will get more efficient operation, etc. Hedge has just saw that first hand. But do they really care if you buy more than you can ever use in your system?

I think it is Alice-in-Wonderland nonsense to say you certainly can add some extra capability to a system as long as you don’t use it!

btw- I am familiar with power distribution, component draw, and where the heat is generated. We built critical custom command and control systems that ran in environments cooled to the extreme. Just so that in the case of a catastrophic event in which air conditioning was lost, there would be that much more time before any surviving computers overheated and failed.
 
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Old 10-22-11, 03:13 PM
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I think this thread has run its course.
 
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