How do I tell what type of Video Card I need?

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  #1  
Old 10-19-11, 10:17 AM
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How do I tell what type of Video Card I need?

I have an older Dell Inspiron 530 computer.
I gave it to my grandson and he wants to be able to play a video game on it but apparently his game needs #d Accelerated Video with 512 MB dedicated video memory and pixel shader 3.0 support.
Other than that the computer will apparently support his game.
I don't mind buying the video card or installing it for him (I am told they just plug in to a slot internally?) but how do I go about determining what type of card to buy?
I see terms like PCI and PCI express which doesn't tell me much.
 
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Old 10-19-11, 10:57 AM
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According to the specs...Documentation you should have a PCIE slot you could use for a video card.

If you look inside the case at the motherboard, it will be the very long 164 pin connector. PCI connectors are only 124 pin, thus shorter. If it's empty (probably is if stock) you should be able to just plug and go.
 
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Old 10-19-11, 11:00 AM
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Thanks for the link.
I will open it up. I had it open at one time and I know there is a long slot of some type there.
 
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Old 10-19-11, 11:41 AM
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Hi,

Use the pci express slot. You only have one. PCI express is 500 MB/s. The older PCI slots, you have two are older and only 133 MB/s.

Secondly that is a very good computer IMO. You should absolutly expand the memory also. up to 4 GB for the 530 and 8 GB for the 530a or 530c. Not sure what you have.

You have 4 memory slots. Each should have 1 MB if the 530 for 4 MB max. or each slot should have 2 MB each for 8 MB if the 530 a or c.

Note. If you only have a 32 bit version of windows it will only recognize 3-3.5 MB. So dont go over that if so. There is a way to check by right clicking on My computer then properties. What does it say where is says System in the general tab?

As far as the video card they are a lot of money. An older NVIDIA Geforce 7 series would be your cheapest option. The 8 and 9 series are a lot more money.

I have not checked all prices lately but I know the memory is abot 40 bucks. Cards can be found on that auction site very cheap.

Mike NJ
 
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Old 10-19-11, 12:35 PM
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I found that the computer has it's manual in it's memory.
I have 2 GB of ram and that is plenty for the game he wants to play and it's fast enough too. It is a 32 bit windows system.
In looking at the manual I see I have 2 PCI slots, one PCI express and a PCI Express 16 slot but until I open it I won't know what is in each slot, if anything.
All I remember when I bought it is that is was just a basic computer.
I guess the next step is to open it up and see if that long slot is available and go buy a card and thanks for the recommendation.
I just hope it does not cost me a lot of money to buy it!
 
  #6  
Old 10-19-11, 12:46 PM
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OK, I just plugged in my Service Tag and this is what is says it came with from Dell when I bought it and I have changed nothing.
1 2336V Card,Planar,No Sound,Dimension4100,a
1 657WP Processor,80526,1GHz,256,133, FC
1 35KKW Keyboard,104,6P,United States,SLTEK,RD,SB
1 886MJ Mouse,Personal System 2,6 Pin,2 Button,Wheel,Microsoft
1 554WF Dual Inline Memory Module,128,133M,16X64,4K,168
1 699YR CD,128K,I,F5,48X,REV,LG,8482B
1 98483 Cable,Data,Compact Disk Drive,EIDE,D,Klinger
1 088GF Card,Multi-Media,Audio,CT5807,PCI64,FAJ
1 57589 CBL,AUD,MOLEX TO MOLEX
1 2010V 17" (16.0" viewable,.28dp)E770Monitor,Dimension
1 1D732 Card,Graphic,ATI,Rage-128 4100
1 7020T Floppy Drive,1.44M,F3,No BezelSony,F/EJ3
1 98480 Cable,Data,Floppy Drive, Klinger
1 5828D Cable,Assembly,ATA66,2Drop, Klinger
1 740NG Hard Drive,20G,IDE,7.2K,F3, 1 Inch,No Controllers/No CableWD-XL20
1 53YPV Kit,Software,OFCSBE-2K-SR1, English,Original Equipment Manufacturer
1 77MYY KIT,DOC/CDSK,W2KPRO,SP1,F5,ENG
1 74UMJ Card,Network,Ethernet,PC Interface,3C905C,RJ45


I see an ATI card, I guess that's a video card? Will I pull that one?
And from what you see here what is the likelihood that the PCI Express 16 slot is open for use?
 
  #7  
Old 10-19-11, 01:06 PM
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It says card...but what I found is that's its actually just a chip on the motherboard. You shouldn't have to remove anything.
 
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Old 10-19-11, 01:28 PM
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OK, so according to what I am reading, if I understand correctly, I should use that long slot, the PCI Express 16?
OK, so in shopping for a card, It says, and I quoted it wrong the first time, that I need 3D accelerated video with DirectX 9 min, 512mb of video memory and Pixel Shader 1.4 support (min) with 3.0 better.
In reading the details of these cards I just don't see all that information.
 
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Old 10-19-11, 01:49 PM
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Whoa back up.. Vic, the specs you linked to aren't for this computer. Either they've recycled a model number or the OP told us the wrong model. The service tag specs show this as a Pentium3 1GHz machine with a Dimension 4100 motherboard. If this is true, then it predates PCIe, and all it will have is PCI and AGP slots. In which case, the choices for a card will be VERY limited, as DirectX9/PS3.0 was right at the upper limits of AGP's speed capability.

Basically your only hope is to find an nVidia GeForce 7800GS512. It was the last and most powerful AGP card that nVidia made, and it is one of the only ones that has 512MB of VRAM. Keep in mind it came out 6 years ago so you're basically only going to find used ones.

Ken, are you sure of the model number and service tag info? How old is this computer? If the service tag specs are right, it would be 8+ years old. If the model number info is correct, it would be under 3 years old.
 
  #10  
Old 10-19-11, 02:00 PM
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I bought this computer new and the case says it's an Inspiron 530.
I just realized that I misread the service tag and got the wrong information, sorry! The service tag sticker is faded and I saw a 0 for a G!

This is the correct information for my computer!

1 CP825 Assembly, Heatsink, Fan, Mini Tower
0 01323 INFORMATION..., NO ITEM
1 CN481 ASSEMBLY..., CHASSIS..., MNTW, Pentium 4 Prescott DT, 3.0GHZ, 1 MEGB, 800FSB..., NON PFC..., PWA INTEGRATED...
1 G614J Processor, 450, 2.2, 512KB Celeron, 35W, A1
1 WN585 INSTRUCTION..., DEVIATE L6 TO L5+, Pentium 4 Prescott DT, 3.0GHZ, 1 MEGB, 800FSB...
1 JY172 PLACEMAT..., GETTING STARTED..., DIMENSION..., DAO/BCC
0 702EX INFORMATION..., PREPARATION MATERIAL..., DEVIATION..., PRECISION WORKSTATION..., INCREASE..., #1
1 DW559 Assembly, DVD+/-RW..., 16X, Half Height, BARE, Sony Nec Optiarc Inc.
1 C003P TECHNICAL SHEET..., DROP IN BOX..., RETAIL..., GENERIC..., ENGLAND/ENGLISH...
1 M144H KIT..., SOFTWARE..., VHB32SP1A, DIGITAL VIDEO DISK DRIVE..., MULTIPLE..., 5
1 R020C Kit, Software, Works, 9, English
0 83535 INFORMATION..., PART, ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY ATTACHMENT PACKET INTERFACE..., DEVICE
1 JF495 Modem, V.92, Data Fax, Internal SON2, Lead Free, Dell Americas Organization
1 C831D Kit, Software, Powerdvd, 7.0 Digital Video Disk Drive 7.0-02
1 XN966 KIT..., MOUSE..., UNIVERSAL SERIAL BUS..., 2BTN, OPTICAL..., LOGITECH...
1 P005H KIT..., SOFTWARE..., ROXIO..., 10.2-0, DE
1 F750N DISPLAY..., FLAT PANEL DISPLAY..., 17, S1709W, , FLAT PANNEL IN BOX..., RETAIL...
1 RH659 Keyboard, 104, UNIVERSAL SERIAL BUS..., UNITED STATES..., Black, DARFON ELECTRONICS, CORP...
2 CM633 Dual In-line Memory Module 1GB, 800, 128X64, 8, 240, 1RX8
1 TR687 Technical Sheet, Terms And Conditions, Generic, Retail
1 X146C Kit, Speaker, 1.2W, AX210, Nmb, Ship In Box
1 TY782 Hard Drive, 250G, S2, 7.2, 32M HIT-GEM
 
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Old 10-19-11, 02:04 PM
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That ATI card is part of the mother board and cant be removed.

This is what it should look like on your computer.




You have 0ne pci express slot. Should be empty.

You have two pci slots. One may have a modem card plugged in. One may be empty.

What you want to use is the PCI express slot. Get a card and plug it into there. Then the connections from the card that will be wxposed out the back of the computer is where the monitor plugs into.

Note. There are things to consider when looking for a card. These boards need power. If the computer power supply dont have enough watts it will not work. Most basic computers have like 300 watt supply. These cards need like 350-400 watt supply.

Cant be sure I am no expert in this area. Just do your homework before you buy.

Thats why gamer PC's are Gamer PC's. It probably can be done because you need to find a card that supports 3.0 shader and has a lower power consumption. Like I said the NVIDIA 6 or 7 series. They are good cards. There are other manufacturers but I like Nvidia.

Support.

Support

Mike NJ
 
  #12  
Old 10-19-11, 02:09 PM
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Wow, this is sure getting involved.
I am going to have to do more research now for sure.
 
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Old 10-19-11, 02:12 PM
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Ok that's better.. Yes you would have a PCIe slot and could use a capable budget card such as the GeForce 200 series. Here's one for $50: Newegg.com - EVGA 01G-P3-1313-KR GeForce 210 1GB 64-bit DDR3 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready Low Profile Ready Video Card


HOWEVER, since this motherboard has its video built in, you might have two issues with the power supply. First, it may be under powered/too small.

If you look at the sticker on it and it says anything less than 400W, it'll need to be replaced.

Second, PCIe cards require a special connector. Look for a loose rectangle connector with 6 or 8 pins, and only yellow and black wires going to it. Because there are adapters available this isn't critical, but if the supply isn't big enough you can't even use an adapter.
 
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Old 10-19-11, 02:15 PM
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I assume you are talking internal on the machine on the power supply for the wattage?
 
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Old 10-19-11, 02:19 PM
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Yes. There should be a sticker listing its total wattage. Ideally you shouldn't be under 450w, but under 400 is not going to cut it. Dell usually uses bare minimums, so dont be surprised if it says 350w or less.
 
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Old 10-19-11, 02:21 PM
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OK, Thanks.
This is going to get expensive, I can tell.
 
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Old 10-19-11, 02:24 PM
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IWhat games is he playing? It may be cheaper to just get him a gaming console like XBOX 360 which I feel is the better of them all.

Mike NJ
 
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Old 10-19-11, 02:25 PM
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Not really, you're looking at $100 or less all told. If you go with the video card I linked to:Newegg.com - EVGA 01G-P3-1313-KR GeForce 210 1GB 64-bit DDR3 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready Low Profile Ready Video Card

..and a decent budget power supply would be like $45 or so:Newegg.com - COOLER MASTER eXtreme Power Plus RS500-PCARD3-US 500W ATX12V v2.3 Power Supply (this even has a $10 rebate on it, so it's $35!), it's not that bad.

The only other thing (that's optional really at this point) is doubling the RAM, and that can be had for $30-40.Newegg.com - CORSAIR XMS2 2GB (2 x 1GB) 240-Pin DDR2 SDRAM DDR2 800 (PC2 6400) Dual Channel Kit Desktop Memory Model TWIN2X2048-6400
 
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Old 10-19-11, 02:30 PM
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OK, I just talked to him on the phone and I was getting conflicting information.
It turns out that the minimum requirements for his game are as follows:

3D accelerated Video with 32 mb dedicated video memory. Windows DirectX 9 compliance (pixel shader 1.4 support)
That is directly off his game called Realflight.
And the ram rquirements were 2 GB which that unit has.
 
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Old 10-19-11, 02:36 PM
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Originally Posted by keninaz View Post
OK, I just talked to him on the phone and I was getting conflicting information.
It turns out that the minimum requirements for his game are as follows:

3D accelerated Video with 32 mb dedicated video memory. Windows DirectX 9 compliance (pixel shader 1.4 support)
That is directly off his game called Realflight.
And the ram rquirements were 2 GB which that unit has.
Integrated video generally has little or no dedicated memory, it shares system memory (Intel calls it DVMT - Dynamic Video Memory Technology). This is not meet the requirements so you're still going to need a new video card.
 
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Old 10-19-11, 02:38 PM
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And that card you are talking about you think will require a bigger power supply if it's under 350w?
 
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Old 10-19-11, 02:43 PM
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Originally Posted by keninaz View Post
And that card you are talking about you think will require a bigger power supply if it's under 350w?
It depends on how small it actually is. I just looked up its requirements and it's not a hog - it only uses 18w, but if your system already has 285w on a 300w supply, it's not going to work.
 
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Old 10-19-11, 02:46 PM
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OK, thanks, opening the unit up again to look.
 
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Old 10-19-11, 03:11 PM
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Just my luck, it's only a 300 watt supply.
Now, the next question, how would you tell what kind of power I am already using?
Or should I just assume that in stock configuration that this unit was being taxed pretty much to the max already?
 
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Old 10-19-11, 03:14 PM
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Matt here is spec on that card.

Requirements
Minimum of a 300 Watt power supply.
(Minimum recommended power supply with +12 Volt current rating of 18 Amps.)

Mike NJ
 
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Old 10-19-11, 03:15 PM
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OK, I guess I could try it then?
 
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Old 10-19-11, 03:20 PM
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Your better off getting the 210 at a place like this. $11 bucks. Look around.



PNY NVIDIA GeForce 210 (VCGG2105XEB) 512 MB DDR2 SDRAM PCI Express 2.0 x16 Gr... | eBay

Mike NJ
 
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Old 10-19-11, 03:25 PM
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OK, give the kid a computer and spend $100 making it into what he wants it to be.
What a deal?
Thanks for all the information.
I will have to see what's available locally. Small town with very little I am afraid to say.
But my son spend money on the game for him too so he's already out money too. Kids!
 
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Old 10-19-11, 03:48 PM
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Honestly I wouldn't buy that from ebay used. Especially from a private seller with no return policy. Too big a risk of DOA, then you have to fight with ebay over protection. And it's not $11, that's what it's currently bid to with 4 days left.

The GeForce 8400 would work too, and that's a few bucks cheaper: Newegg.com - EVGA 01G-P3-1302-LR GeForce 8400 GS 1GB 64-bit DDR3 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready Low Profile Ready Video Card
 
  #30  
Old 10-20-11, 04:33 PM
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Sometimes Companies like Dell and HP will sell video cards that will work better with what you have. HP I know does that for sure as I looked into a video card for for the old motherboard on a computer I bought at auction only to find out that the motherboard was malfunctioning. So I would speak to someone at Dells parts department first as they just might have a card that will work with your present power supply. Make note however that not all power supplies are made equally as are not all motherboards equal in the power requirements nor can all mother boards take the same amount of wattage as another board so that has to be carefully considered. I know some Dells for instance have proprietary power supplies and you can sometimes find a replacement not made by Dell and sometimes not. So look carefully at the motherboard and note all of the places on the board where it needs a power cord as some motherboards take power at one spot and some two spots. Also be sure to unplug the computer and stand on a tile floor if possible to avoid static electricity or ground yourself with a grounding strap you can buy online or at an electronics shop. Not doing so could fry your computer. I wish you luck with your project.
 
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Old 10-20-11, 07:24 PM
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There's no reason to unplug the computer. Just turn off the main switch on the back. Keeping it plugged in actually keeps the case grounded, which helps keep static at bay. But make sure the main switch is off, because otherwise there could be problems.

Also, Dell hasn't used proprietary power supplies in desktops for a while. It is cheaper for them to source off the shelf parts than proprietary. Only some models in the XPS series and some servers still have a proprietary supply.

And finally, there is no such thing as 'too big' when talking about a power supply. The wattage only indicates what it is capable of providing. The power supply doesn't "force" wattage into the motherboard, so there's absolutely no reason to wonder if the motherboard can "handle" it. You could put a 5,000 watt supply into a Pentium 2 computer if you want, and the motherboard will only draw the couple hundred watts that it needs.
 
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Old 10-20-11, 07:38 PM
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Sometimes Companies like Dell and HP will sell video cards that will work better with what you have.
Yes although you could order the better video card from these companies they then put in a different power supply. Since his was ordered with the integrated card it probably dont have a upgraded power supply. Make sense?

My take on it.

Mike NJ
 
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Old 10-20-11, 09:01 PM
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Originally Posted by lawrosa View Post
Yes although you could order the better video card from these companies they then put in a different power supply. Since his was ordered with the integrated card it probably dont have a upgraded power supply. Make sense?

My take on it.

Mike NJ
That's exactly right. They spec the power supply to be bare minimum for each machine configuration (as I said, with profit margin in mind). The better equipped the machine, the larger the power supply installed. But with the exception of the Alienware machines (which are designed to be user upgradeable/reconfigurable), there won't be a lot of spare capacity.
 
  #34  
Old 10-21-11, 02:59 AM
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I have to agree to disagree as to the power supply issue. I checked with a manufacturer of power supplies and they said their power supply might be too much wattage for an HP computer. Different brand but the same problem. The manufacturer of the power supply said that even if a board was made by Asus which my board was for HP it was made to HPs standard. So yes some things I agree are stock items that you can get anywhere but other things are not. So it is best to check with the manufacturer of the computer and not necessarily the Motherboard to see if that particular power supply will work with that board. Most computer manufacturers will tell you not to go more than 50 watts above the stated power supply or you could have problems with overheating components. Computer manufacturers do that because they want your return business for parts they don't want you to go somewhere else for a part. If you build your own computer out of parts you buy like an MSI motherboard or an Asus not connected with a computer manufacturer then you are o.k. to buy whatever power supply you want as the board can take it. I have asked people at Dell and HP about this very issue before and they agree with the power supply manufacturer.
 
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Old 10-21-11, 03:17 AM
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Sorry, that's not the way it works. There's no such thing as "too much wattage" in terms of a power supply. Anyone who told you otherwise is either stupid or intentionally lying to you. Plain and simple. In the case of HP and Dell, we know that it's because they're stupid. But I don't know what the 'power supply manufacturer's' excuse is. They know better. What manufacturer is this so I can make sure to never buy one of their products again?

Power supplies are rated in terms of their AVAILABLE power. They don't FORCE FEED their maximum labeled wattage into the motherboard/components, the components draw what they need. An UNDERSIZED supply will overheat and burn out, possibly taking other components with it. But as long as it meets the draw requirements of the board, drives, and cards, it doesn't matter how large a supply you use.

No offense, but I suggest you read up on how electricity works.
 
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Old 10-21-11, 08:55 AM
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Jersey Matt is 100% correct. For example n your home you routinely use lights that only draw 60 watts on a circuit capable of supplying 1800-2400 watts.
 
  #37  
Old 10-21-11, 11:54 AM
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hi guys

Is it possible that the manufacturers mean that some mobos require a narrower input tolerance than some power supplies can generate as output? So the recommended PSU-Mobo match is more for tolerances than anything else?

But I have to admit Im confused. I buy a bigger power supply because I want more wattage. Why do I want more wattage? Presumably because I plan to use it. Otherwise, why increase the power supply wattage?

If I use more wattage then I generate more heat. If I hold the rest of the configuration constant (case, fans, whatever), except for the components Ive added which necessitated the extra wattage, then I need to worry about the dissipation of the extra heat.

So I as a computer manufacturer would unconditionally associate the change to a larger power supply with extra heat - and so now I would be worried. What would I recommend as a manufacturer? I would think the manufacturer would have an impossible time calculating the heat dissipation problem of a larger power supply on his configuration which is dependent on many variables. Testing would not be cost-effective.

So I as a manufacturer would simply say, anything above an additional x watts for the power supply is too much of an increase, where x is a small number (e.g., 50 watts) pulled directly out of the air. I dont want to set x=0 watts, because that makes my computer look too inflexible and is bad for marketing.

In other words, to me it seems perfectly reasonable for a manufacturer to say a given power supply is too big for his computer and not be wrong?
 
  #38  
Old 10-21-11, 01:46 PM
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Zoesdad I couldn't have said it better myself. The boards that are made for the manufacturers like Dell and HP can't take as much heat. Sure the voltage remains constant and yes you can use as large a power supply as you want but in a Dell or HP it is not recommended beyond a certain wattage because of the heat. The cases for one thing are to blame on some of those pre-built computers as they don't allow for heat dissipation as well. Why the bad case or one that is at least smaller, money thats the word for it they can make the computer cheaper if they skimp on the case and not allow for more heat sinks on the motherboards which help to dissipate heat. Still a good computer no doubt about it and I have worked on many different brands in my lifetime and both Dell and HP are among the better brands although there are some manufacturers that are better for some things that they are not.
 
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Old 10-21-11, 02:50 PM
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Originally Posted by zoesdad View Post
hi guys

Is it possible that the manufacturers mean that some mobos require a narrower input tolerance than some power supplies can generate as output? So the recommended PSU-Mobo match is more for tolerances than anything else?
No. The ATX standard specifies pinouts and voltage. Voltages must be in conformance (+12v, +5v, +3.3v, all +/- 5%, negative voltages +/- 2%, PG signal 100-500mS). That has nothing to do with wattage. No motherboard manufacturer specifies a "maximum wattage" for the power supply.

Take anything that Dell, HP, or any other brand builder's alleged 'tech support' in India tells you with a huge lump of salt. They have no clue what they're talking about, all they do is read a script and follow a flow chart. That's why you can't just tell them your problem, they make you go through the specific sequence until 2 hours later you finally arrive at the problem. They are totally worthless as far as diagnosis or accurate information.

But I have to admit Im confused. I buy a bigger power supply because I want more wattage. Why do I want more wattage? Presumably because I plan to use it. Otherwise, why increase the power supply wattage?
It could also be to accommodate future expansion (such as a graphics card, an extra hard drive or two, DVD burner, etc). If the price is right there's absolutely no reason not to use the biggest power supply you can.

If I use more wattage then I generate more heat. If I hold the rest of the configuration constant (case, fans, whatever), except for the components Ive added which necessitated the extra wattage, then I need to worry about the dissipation of the extra heat.
Again, the components draw what they need completely regardless of the power available in the supply, and simply upgrading to a larger power supply will NOT result in more heat. In fact, it will result in LESS heat because the larger power supply is not operating as close to maximum capacity. Not only that, but the fan in a power supply is an exhauster. It pulls the heat directly out the back of the case, it doesn't push it into the case.

So I as a computer manufacturer would unconditionally associate the change to a larger power supply with extra heat - and so now I would be worried. What would I recommend as a manufacturer? I would think the manufacturer would have an impossible time calculating the heat dissipation problem of a larger power supply on his configuration which is dependent on many variables. Testing would not be cost-effective.

So I as a manufacturer would simply say, anything above an additional x watts for the power supply is too much of an increase, where x is a small number (e.g., 50 watts) pulled directly out of the air. I dont want to set x=0 watts, because that makes my computer look too inflexible and is bad for marketing.

In other words, to me it seems perfectly reasonable for a manufacturer to say a given power supply is too big for his computer and not be wrong?
No, it's not reasonable at all. The example you gave is not valid because again, it doesn't work that way.

Here's a more proper one:

You have a computer with a 300w power supply. The motherboard, CPU, cards, and heat sink fans use 230w combined, the hard drive uses 30w, DVD drive 15w. That's 275w. The power supply fails, and you find a fantastic deal on a new name-brand 600w supply. It's cheaper than a 300w replacement.

If you put that 600w supply into the computer, the computer is still going to draw and dissipate 275w of power. It's not going to increase the amount of heat generated by the components even one tiny bit, because the power requirements of the components has not changed.

As I said, because the new supply is better quality and not running at max capacity (which is partly why stock supplies fail quickly in the first place) there will be LESS heat generated within the supply itself. But like I said, that's moot anyway since the PS fan exhausts out the back of the case, not into it.

Now that being said, adding a graphics card that has a 16w draw WILL add those 16w as heat into the case, but not because of anything to do with the size of the power supply. It's because it uses 16w of power. 16w is not a lot relative to what's already there. If that causes any noticeable increase in case temperature, then it means the cooling capacity was marginal to begin with, and all one would have to do is add another fan.
 
  #40  
Old 10-21-11, 02:53 PM
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Originally Posted by hedgeclippers View Post
Zoesdad I couldn't have said it better myself. The boards that are made for the manufacturers like Dell and HP can't take as much heat. Sure the voltage remains constant and yes you can use as large a power supply as you want but in a Dell or HP it is not recommended beyond a certain wattage because of the heat. The cases for one thing are to blame on some of those pre-built computers as they don't allow for heat dissipation as well. Why the bad case or one that is at least smaller, money thats the word for it they can make the computer cheaper if they skimp on the case and not allow for more heat sinks on the motherboards which help to dissipate heat. Still a good computer no doubt about it and I have worked on many different brands in my lifetime and both Dell and HP are among the better brands although there are some manufacturers that are better for some things that they are not.
See above for why this is totally wrong.
 
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