How to increase Wi-Fi range in a house

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Old 10-09-12, 07:13 PM
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How to increase Wi-Fi range in a house

I tried the Amped Wireless SR300 and it's so not reliable I have to reboot it every 6 or 8 hours and barely can get the range I want. My wireless modem/router is in the basement and I need to extend that range upstairs and some in my backyard. The thing is I have a cat5 cable that I ran last month that goes from my wireless router/modem all the way upstairs to a home office to a computer that's near the backyard. Is there something on the market that could take that signal (modem/router to cat5 cable signal) and get it to transmit Wi-Fi upstairs?

Access point would work or should I get a better Wi-Fi extender with more range?
 
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Old 10-09-12, 07:18 PM
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I bought a Netgear R6300 and put it on the second floor of my house. I get a couple of houses away with useable range.
 
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Old 10-09-12, 10:49 PM
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Also if possible sometimes just moving the router is enough to get you a better signal. For instance if your router is near your furnace you might want to move it further away from there and more towards the middle of the house. Your extender should also work better as it will then get a better signal from your router and then be able to boost that signal better. Wifi though is always tricky and you really are better off running cat5 where you can.
 
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Old 10-10-12, 02:02 AM
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I brought mine out of my basement office into our upstairs and the signal improved quite a bit laterally. I also bought a Netgear N600 dual band router. We run computers, Roku, and a Microcell off it, and switching routers seemed to make quite a significant difference.
 
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Old 10-10-12, 05:49 AM
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Is there a way to use the existing cat5 from my modem to the SR300 and make that signal Wi-FI upstairs? Or just return the SR300 and buy an access point?
 
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Old 10-10-12, 05:56 AM
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When the signal goes from the wireless router/access point to your device, it has to pass through verious walls and other materials. One thing to remember, if the signal is going through a 6" wall at a 90' angle (straight through), it's only going through 6" of material. If the signal is going through that same 6" wall, but at a 45' angle to the device, it's going through 8" of material.

Relocating the router/access point to an upper floor will help.

For our house, the requirement was full wifi coverage on all floors (3 stories plus basement) and anywhere on the property (96x285). I opted to run a cat6 (better fire rating and I had a box or two) from the communications cabinet in the basement to the attic. In the attic, I added another access point with a high gain external omi-directional antenna.
This might be a bit overkill for most folks, but with cellular coverage being very poor in our area, our smart phones along with all our other devices depend on wifi or wired connection. The second access point does reduce the bottle neck issues of the 802.11G 54mbps half-duplex (split between all wireless devices connected). I now have wireless coverage a block and change away from the house as well.

Long story short, depending on the size and materials your home is built from, you could move your router/access point to the other end of that cable you have run and see if that will cut it. I'd also take note of how many wireless devices you have in your house (smart phones, computers, TV set top devices, DVD players, etc). Those all add up and share your router's output (802.11B = 11mbps split between all connected devices, 802.11G = 54mbps split between all connected devices, 802.11N = Not yet certified, still draft standard).
 
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Old 10-10-12, 01:41 PM
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Similar to Mike, I used to have my office PC hooked up and the router downstairs. I just ran Cat5 from the PC upstairs and hooked it into the Router, so it is hardwired so to speak. Everything else, printer, computers, Roku, Microcell are wireless.

it's going through 8" of material.
Oh Mike, it's 8.4852", but who's measuring????
 
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Old 10-17-12, 08:30 AM
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My AP is on the ground floor and still reaches the basement and manages to also reach all of the way past the other side of the house and into the detached garage, though only just barely out there. House and workshop are block construction.

I would move the AP upstairs if possible. If the entry point for the cablemodem or DSL modem is downstairs and can't be moved then you might be able to split the Cat5 cable, using the green and orange pairs on one jack at each end on the normal colors, and the blue and brown pairs punched into the orange and green punchdowns on another set of jacks. 10Base-T and 100Base-TX only use two pairs, so you can cheat if you have to in order to get essentially two runs in one cable. This won't work for Gigabit though, as that uses all four pairs. It's kludge, but in a home setting would probably be fine.
 
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