How to configure two routers?

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  #1  
Old 08-11-13, 08:14 AM
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How to configure two routers?

I have a cable modem connected to one router (wireless disabled), which feeds my Blu Ray player and the second modem (connected to "Internet" port). The second modem has wireless enabled and one of the hard-wired ports goes to my PC and the other to my printer. I recently replaced the second router with a Linksys E1500 (previously using a Westell DSL modem) and I've been having problems with my wireless devices, specifically when streaming video from my TV. I did not have a problem with the DSL modem and expected the new router to be much better. The signal strength is good, but the speed is slower. I'm thinking I may have a conflict between the two routers. Can someone instruct me on how to properly configure the two routers so there are no conflicts. BTW, the hardwired internet connection to my PC is much faster--it's the wireless I'm having problems with. Channel is set to "auto" and both routers are set to DHCP.
 
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Old 08-11-13, 08:19 AM
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The computer pros will chime in here shortly, but if you are using a router wirelessly, why not just use a switch for your hardwired items? The routers could still be fighting for bandwith. If you were needing both routers for streaming, etc. you could use a dual band router. Mine is a Netgear 34-5g
 
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Old 08-11-13, 08:58 AM
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I have to ask...why 2 routers? Almost all I've seen have 4 ethernet jacks on the back, and it seems you are only using 3?

I'm also confused how you replaced a DSL modem with a router? Did you change services?
 
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Old 08-11-13, 01:43 PM
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I'm using two routers because the cable feed is in the basement and my PC is on the 1st floor. I have the Blu Ray player and the basement TV connected to the first router (which is in the basement next to the modem) with wireless disabled and my PC and printer connected to the second router, which is on the 1st floor in my office, with wireless enabled. Reason for doing so was so I wouldn't' have to feed cables from the first floor to the basement to feed the Blu Ray player and TV. I was using a DSL router as the second router until yesterday because I had it left over from when I had DSL service. I was using it as a wireless access point and also an internet connection for my PC. Everything was working fine until I upgraded to this faster router. Again, the hard-wired internet connection works fine (actually noticeably faster) but the wireless isn't performing as well (wireless signal strength appears normal but videos are buffering--this wasn't a problem when using the DSL router). My whole point for replacing the DSL router was because I figured it was probably limiting my wireless connection speed.
 
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Old 08-11-13, 01:50 PM
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What the routers do know is one is used as the router and the other is used as a repeater... If you bought the same brand some come just as a repeater or extender...

One is the master and all others talk to it...

What is your main router????

What is the second router? ( I think you stated that)

Makes and models....

I think you whent about is all wrong... Probably ssid issues I would think....
 
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Old 08-11-13, 02:01 PM
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1st router is a D-Link DR-601 and the second is a Linksys E1500. The signal is split in the basement in order to feed the Blu Ray on the 1st floor (from below) and the second router on teh 1st floor. Two reasons for doing this--so I don't have to run two cables from the upstairs to the basement (for the PC and printer) and so my wireless signal is broadcast from the middle floor of the house for the best signal upstairs. I could install a new cable outlet on the 1st floor in the office and move everything there, but I like having the modem in the basement out of the way. Plus I'm planning on installing a media panel in the near future for internet, phone, and cable, which will be mounted in the basement.

This is my current setup:

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Last edited by mossman; 08-11-13 at 04:51 PM.
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Old 08-11-13, 02:13 PM
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Is the first router from your provider?

What do you mean spit the signal???

Thats a 150N are you using N or G on your wireless devices? Or are you just using that router as a hard wire to computer and printer?
 
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Old 08-11-13, 02:24 PM
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I would use the linksys in the basement and get rid of the d link...

Then I would get a range extender for upstairs....

Buy Linksys RE1000 Wireless Extender | Free Shipping

There is another extender... I did not read the differences... Just breezed through it...
 
  #9  
Old 08-11-13, 04:50 PM
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This is my current setup, and this is what works for my situation. I'm trying to determine why the wireless is not as fast as it was when using the Westell DSL modem. Both routers are set to DHCP and the TV that I stream from lists the IP for the Linksys router as the default gateway and the first router as the DNS. Signal strength is almost at the max, but videos are not playing without buffering. Could it be that there are too many 2.4 GHz networks in my area causing interference? FYI, I tried switching the Linksys router to "Bridged Mode" and that didn't help. It actually prevented me from accessing the setup menu so I had to reset the router. This is apparently a common problem with the E1500 and nobody seems to know why it does this. That is beside the point though. Westell DSL router was set to "access point" and wireless worked fine.

Attachment 16212
 
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Old 08-11-13, 05:26 PM
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Everything is hard wired but the smart TV????

The dr 601 is only a 150 n... Get rid of that thing... Is that from your provider?????

The e 1500 is the better router and should come off the cable modem...
 
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Old 08-11-13, 07:08 PM
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I don't know how auto channel works on different routers, but you may want to manually set the channels to two different channels (1, 6 or 11) to ensure they aren't colliding.

I've also found that if you're using a router behind a router, you need to ensure they are using different IP range for each one. But considering the wired network is working, this isn't likely your issue.
 
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Old 08-11-13, 07:31 PM
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I am not the expert others are here concerning routers as they have been using routers longer than me. What I have heard though is that it isn't always a good idea to bridge two routers together especially ones that are of differing ages and differing technology. I agree with Mike I think you will do better with a range extender and I think I would stay with Linksys as I believe in my own opinion that Linksys is the better brand.
 
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Old 08-12-13, 05:32 AM
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Everything is hard wired but the smart TV????
Yes, but I also use wireless for my laptop, mobile phone, tablet, and Wii.

The dr 601 is only a 150 n... Get rid of that thing... Is that from your provider?????
Yes, the D-Link was provided by my provider. Other than being 150 Mbps, what is the problem with the D-Link? My internet speed is only 25 Mbps max anyhow. I can buy another Linksys E1500 if needed.

The e 1500 is the better router and should come off the cable modem...
Roger that.

I don't know how auto channel works on different routers, but you may want to manually set the channels to two different channels (1, 6 or 11) to ensure they aren't colliding.
I disabled the wireless radio on the D-Link, so only the Linksys is transmitting.

I agree with Mike I think you will do better with a range extender and I think I would stay with Linksys as I believe in my own opinion that Linksys is the better brand.
I need two hard-wired connections in the office on the 1st floor--one for my PC and one for my printer. Therefore, I need a router/hub/etc. in that room, and I also need a router in the basement to feed the Blu ray and this is where my media panel will be. If I get another Linksys router to replace the D-Link, how do I configure them? Set the first one to DHCP and the other to Bridged Mode?
 
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Old 08-12-13, 06:31 AM
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You have DSL or cable??? I assume cable right???


I think you need to tell your provider that you want to use your own router... They need to regester the # I think... Why do they provide you with only a 150N??? Are there other routers they will provide you?



But what cards do you have in your computers and such??? Are they even N wireless cards?


Anyway I use netgear... They have better stuff especially for what you want to do..

Here is what I have... I have this router coming off cable modem.. You can make you own judgement call...

So this is coming off the cable modem.. It has 4 ports and is wireless..

WNR3500L



Now here is the range extender I have upstairs... I have sones smart TV/xbox / computer and such plugged into it. My other son in the other room uses Wii/smart tv/ computer wireless... They all have i pods and crap like that...

WN2000RPT



With that said I have always been a fan of netgear because its simple and does what I want it too... I think this is more in line with what you want..

The extender only talks to the first unit.

Hope this helps...
 
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Old 08-12-13, 07:08 AM
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So you are basically getting the reliability and performance of a wireless signal to your hard-wired devices upstairs. I like having my PC and printer hard-wired directly to the incoming signal with no devices relying on the speed and integrity of a wireless signal (e.g. video streaming).
 

Last edited by mossman; 08-12-13 at 07:57 AM.
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Old 08-12-13, 08:39 AM
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Cant daisy chain AFAIK...Or it becomes a setting nightmare...

What you want to do then is use your 1500 as the main... This will get you 300n wirless. Use this after the modem.




Then put the range extender upstairs... This will take care of the wireless. Has one ethernet port incase you need it for something.

Buy Linksys RE1000 Wireless Extender | Free Shipping

As far as the hard wire part just get a switch.... Simple...Done....

Buy Linksys SE1500 Network Switch | Free Shipping

 
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Old 08-12-13, 08:53 AM
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Or you can get another router ( e1500) and do the same thing....

Read here page 37...

Now you may be able to do with what you have and the settings are messed up... IDK... I like having matched stuff with clear instructions...(I am no IT pro for sure)

http://downloads.linksys.com/downloa...-01486_Web.pdf

Something with the DHCP and both giving out IP addresses... You only want one router as the main.....
 
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Old 08-12-13, 08:54 AM
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As far as the hard wire part just get a switch.... Simple...Done....
That's basically what I'm using the D-Link router for--a switch. Come to think of it, I bought a switch months ago but didn't use it because I decided to use my spare Westell DSL router instead. Can I put the switch after the modem in the basement to feed the Blu Ray, then connect the Linksys router in the office to feed the PC and printer? Would not having a router connected to the Blu Ray affect anything? I'm assuming since it's just a Blu Ray player, it doesn't need any kind of firewall or security like my PC does.
 

Last edited by mossman; 08-12-13 at 09:38 AM.
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Old 08-12-13, 09:38 AM
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Something with the DHCP and both giving out IP addresses... You only want one router as the main.....
According to the Smart TV, the Linksys is the default gateway and the D-Link is the DNS server. No clue if this is correct. Probably best to just use one router. Can I simply replace the D-Link router with the switch, or does the router need to come first after the modem?
 
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Old 08-12-13, 10:03 AM
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Pretty sure you can run the switch first...
 
  #21  
Old 08-12-13, 02:29 PM
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Turns out I have a Linksys SE1500 switch, so I may have a winning combination here.

I tried connecting the switch first followed by the router and it did not work. Guess there's a reason why one of the router jacks says "internet" on it, but the switch doesn't.
 
  #22  
Old 08-13-13, 05:36 AM
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I like the setup I have and the wireless worked fine when I was using the Westell DSL modem as a wireless access point (and hard-wired connection for my PC and printer). Only since I have switched to a Linksys E1500 do I now have problems streaming video wirelessly with my Smart TV. I'm hoping it is just some setting I need to change. Can someone instruct me on how to configure (through the browser interface) a D-Link DR-601 and Linksys E1500 when connected as shown in my diagram? For example, which one is set to DHCP, which one is DNS, do I enable or disable security on one or the other, do I set the Linksys to bridged mode, if so does this make my PC vulnerable to attacks via wireless connection, etc. My hard-wired internet connections are faster with the new Linksys router but my wireless is slower. I don't understand.
 
  #23  
Old 08-14-13, 04:07 AM
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You're doing the same thing I am. My internet-connected router has the wireless turned off. The other modem's "Internet" port is connected to one of the 4 ports on the first modem, and wifi is enabled with security. The only thing I had to do was make sure that any machine connected to either modem (including the second modem) had a unique IP address. In other words, if both modems are assigning IPs in the network 192.168.1.xxx, change one of them to 192.168.2.xxx. ("xxx" is the number assigned by the modem.) This is usually done by navigating to the modem's web server from a browser.

What happens if you temporarily disconnect the Dlink and replace it with the Linksys? Do you still have wifi issues?
 
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Old 08-14-13, 01:36 PM
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You're doing the same thing I am. My internet-connected router has the wireless turned off. The other modem's "Internet" port is connected to one of the 4 ports on the first modem, and wifi is enabled with security. The only thing I had to do was make sure that any machine connected to either modem (including the second modem) had a unique IP address. In other words, if both modems are assigning IPs in the network 192.168.1.xxx, change one of them to 192.168.2.xxx. ("xxx" is the number assigned by the modem. This is usually done by navigating to the modem's web server from a browser.
Don't both routers need to have the same network ID though in order to communicate? I don't understand how the D-link (192.168.1.1) can communicate with the Linksys (192.168.0.1) since they are on different networks (192.168.1 and 192.168.0). Again, the wired connections seem to be working fine, it's just the wireless giving me problems.

What happens if you temporarily disconnect the Dlink and replace it with the Linksys? Do you still have wifi issues?
I was going to try that this evening actually. The IT guy here at work recommended changing the channel as well to see if another one works better. Apparently "auto" doesn't mean the router is going to choose the channel with the least traffic, but rather the most common channels (1, 6, 11).

I just checked the setup menus of both routers and the D-link is assigning the Linksys router an IP address of 192.168.0.100, so it's basically treating it as a client (IP listed in Linksys setup says 192.168.1.1). Is this legit?
 

Last edited by mossman; 08-14-13 at 03:05 PM.
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Old 08-14-13, 05:51 PM
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I changed the wireless mode from mixed to b/g and set it to channel 5 and no more buffering. Was probably just to much interference.
 
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Old 08-14-13, 06:14 PM
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B/G you only get speeds of 54 mb/s... Thats why I asked what cards you have... You have that N router thats 300 mb/s.. Much faster using N...

Just saying....
 
  #27  
Old 08-15-13, 05:51 AM
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I doubt that any of my devices have 'N' cards in them. Maybe the Smart TV because it is less than a year old, but the specs don't say. Regardless, my internet speed is only 28 Mbps max so B/G is sufficient. Looks like I just had an interference problem.

Ok, this is the guidance I was given by the IT specialist at work: disable DHCP on the second (Linksys) router and assign it a static IP that is on the same network as the D-Link router and outside of it's DHCP range so there are no duplicate assignments. I'm still not sure why it is currently working with the network IDs being different. Maybe because all of my devices are only accessing the internet, not communicating with one another.
 

Last edited by mossman; 08-15-13 at 06:55 AM.
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Old 08-15-13, 12:23 PM
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From what I have heard you need to make sure the two routers have different i.p. addresses otherwise there is a conflict between the two routers. As to the other things I am not well versed on that and don't keep it in my mind as much as the others here. Glad it is working for you!
 
  #29  
Old 08-16-13, 04:35 AM
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Devices on different networks with different IPs will talk to each other as long as there is a gateway and port settings allow it. That's how your 192.168.x.x machine can talk to the ISP server at 72.86.x.x (or whatever).

In fact, that's why I suggested different networks for the two routers. That way there is no chance of a conflict. By disabling DHCP on the second router you've also eliminated the chance of a conflict but you've also necessitated the use of static addresses. Not a bad thing; just extra work.

As for the slower speed with "G" wireless, it might become obvious if you have to move files from a wireless device to another (wired or wireless) device on your network, or if multiple devices are connected via wireless. For accessing the Internet you'll see no difference.
 
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Old 08-17-13, 04:35 AM
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As for the slower speed with "G" wireless, it might become obvious if you have to move files from a wireless device to another (wired or wireless) device on your network, or if multiple devices are connected via wireless. For accessing the Internet you'll see no difference
.

I never said the speed was slower for 802.11g, I said that my problem was fixed only after switching from 802.11n to 802.11g. The problem with buffering video occurred with 802.11n. However, I also changed the frequency channel at the same time, so its likely that interference was my issue not the mode I was using.
 
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Old 08-19-13, 12:16 PM
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In fact, that's why I suggested different networks for the two routers. That way there is no chance of a conflict. By disabling DHCP on the second router you've also eliminated the chance of a conflict but you've also necessitated the use of static addresses. Not a bad thing; just extra work.
I tried assigning the second router a static IP on the same network as the first router (192.168.0.xxx) and it took the settings but then neither my PC nor my smart TV could connect to the internet (the PC and TV are the only two devices connected to the second router, wired and wireless, respectively). I believe I disabled DHCP as well. Does DHCP need to be enabled on the second router so that it can assign IP addresses to the PC and smart TV? Is this what bridged mode is for (so that the first router can "see" through the second and assign IPs to its devices)?
 
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Old 08-19-13, 01:24 PM
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I believe I know what the problem is--the first router is connected to the second router's "Internet/WAN" port when it should be connected to a LAN port . I'll try switching it when I get home and post the outcome. This has to be it.
 
  #33  
Old 08-19-13, 03:09 PM
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That was it! I switched the ethernet cable from the first router to one of the LAN ports on the second router and now everything is on the same network and works great.
 
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Old 08-19-13, 07:31 PM
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I did that myself with a WAN port I thought it would work the same as a LAN port but then I am a relative newby to routers myself. I was hooking up a laptop temporarily to the internet and it wouldn't work. I then read later on on another website that the WAN port was for input only.
 
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Old 08-20-13, 06:46 AM
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My understanding is that by using the WAN port, the second router was behaving like a router, not a switch--a switch is what I needed. Really the only reason I used a second router as opposed to a switch is because I needed the wireless functionality. All is well
 
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