Not a problem...


  #1  
Old 05-18-14, 04:54 PM
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Not a problem...

...and I should probably put this in general chats..but it is completely computer related.

Dismantling my old roommates HP PC since it was real old and I wanted to recycle it but destroy the HDs. Pulled out the 3.5" thinking that was all it had...40GB...oh yeah this is old. Then noticed something else I hadn't seen in a long time. A 5.25 drive that once I pulled it out I saw was 4-12GB depending on setup. Must have weighed 1.5 lbs!

No model number or anything...so I can't track it at the HP website.

Celeron processor and 512 MB memory.

I can't believe he hauled this old dinosaur around this long when he had a nice laptop that he always used.

How old do you think this was? 98-99?
 
  #2  
Old 05-18-14, 05:52 PM
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The first Celeron was introduced in 1998. I thought that 5.25 drives were gone by then. Was it added to the machine?
 
  #3  
Old 05-18-14, 06:10 PM
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Based on the dust...I think it was the original drive, though could have been migrated from an even older unit he had. He was kind of a hoarder.
 
  #4  
Old 05-18-14, 06:24 PM
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You guys are making me feel old. When I graduated from tech school I interviewed with IBM where they were building magnetic core memory units, 67. From there the chip race was on, 8K, 16K, 32K and at each level they felt they had changed the world forever. Little did we know where we were headed.

Bud
 
  #5  
Old 05-18-14, 06:34 PM
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5.25" drive, the "real" floppy disk drive when disks were floppy.
 
  #6  
Old 05-18-14, 07:08 PM
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A 5.25 hdd? I saw one of those years ago from a guy who would make computers and he also did repairs. I think he was a hoarder myself and he put that into one of the cases with the earlier ATX motherboards that was among the first to turn off automatically when you clicked on shut down. The computer though was a piece of junk and had really bad memory slots that wouldn't hold onto the memory. I think when I bought that computer it was around 1998 or 1999 but it might have been a bit earlier than that.
 
  #7  
Old 05-18-14, 08:26 PM
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There was only one company that made 5.25" IDE hard drives, and that was Quantum with their "Bigfoot" line in the mid 90's. Other than that, 5.25" hard drives were MFM, which required a special controller card and I believe topped out at a hundred megs or so (and they were f'n huge - they took up two full drive bays).
 
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Old 05-18-14, 08:28 PM
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It was actually a Quantum Bigfoot JM....nice call.
 
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Old 05-18-14, 08:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Tolyn Ironhand View Post
5.25" drive, the "real" floppy disk drive when disks were floppy.
No way man.. 8" was where it was AT!
 
  #10  
Old 05-18-14, 09:22 PM
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See my other post (wherever it is) about my first computer usage.
 
  #11  
Old 05-18-14, 11:37 PM
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Vic you are right it was Quantum Bigfoot and was that thing huge it was as big as a DVD drive but heavier. I had it for a while and then it started making the click of death and it was then that I knew I wanted to get rid of it. Those drives were different from many in that you could easily take them apart to destroy them. So that is what I did I took the cover off using a Philips screw driver and broke the platters. The hdd wasn't very big I forget exactly but I think only 6GB or so. That was a very long time ago and I doubt the company is in business anymore.

Here is a link to a Wikipedia article about the Quantum Bigfoot hard drive Quantum Bigfoot (hard drive) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia . They say they were kind of loud and I do remember that they were. They also said that they could be a bit slow to access information and they they were. I also remember the claims that were made about the drives being more shock resistant. I really can't say they were any better just bigger. I also found out the company is still in business making other things.
 

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  #12  
Old 05-19-14, 02:12 PM
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... IBM where they were building magnetic core memory units, 67...

As an ancillary part of my software job, since I was making the trip anyway, I would hand carry “core memories” for our system to Germany as part of a development project we were doing for the U.S. 7th Army back around 1971.

They were so expensive that the person meeting me on the other end, who received them, had to be bonded. LOL I’m sure today, without any exaggeration, that amount of memory would cost a fraction of a cent.
 
  #13  
Old 05-19-14, 02:25 PM
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If my ears did not fail me a recent news report on the troubled missile silos mentioned they were still using 8" drives, I assumed the old floppy. My company serviced the 4701 IBM controllers that also used the 8" floppy drive back in ?85?

All I could think of when I heard that was, that is what's running our missile defense?!!

Bud
 
  #14  
Old 05-19-14, 02:45 PM
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Amazing isn't it? I worked for a high tech company too. We still used punch cards for payroll long after punch cards were obsolete. No manager wanted to pay to replace the payroll system.

I remember seeing a potential customers eyes pop out when walking down the hall he saw those obsolete key punches and punch card readers. LOL

(They finally started to put a curtain over the window to hide them. LOL)

The 8 inch floppies - Yep I used them. (Builds character. LOL)
 
  #15  
Old 05-20-14, 04:00 AM
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I used 8-inch floppies for years in video editing suites to save edit decision lists. Allowing an editor to save his work at the end of a shift meant the suite could be used 24/7 -- tripling the company's income. A whopping 64k of storage on each disk. Never heard of one failing.
 
  #16  
Old 05-20-14, 08:50 AM
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That's because the data was stored at single density on the early 8's.. The higher the data density gets, the more prone magnetic media is to failure.. 3.5" 1.44MB High Density floppies were almost synonymous with "Unrecoverable Read Error" as the media aged or environmental factors took their toll.
 
  #17  
Old 05-20-14, 10:15 AM
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Worked in a hospital that used 12" diameter real to real for CTs. Not sure of the tape width. Sonograms by comparison were low tech. A Polaroid camera was hinged to the side of the monitor and swung into place for pictures.
 
  #18  
Old 05-20-14, 11:01 AM
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...All I could think of when I heard that was, that is what's running our missile defense?!!


That does blow your mind. But I can believe it. What I saw over the years if my memory serves well (maybe it does?, LOL) even though the hardware becomes orders of magnitudes cheaper, and orders of magnitude more reliable, in many cases the old software just can’t be ported to new hardware – unless you try some kind of emulation (that’s risky). And many of these old systems have man-centuries invested in the development of the software, and thus the slowly evolved software and system becomes extremely reliable over time.

The software can implement schemes to monitor and automatically switch in redundant backup hardware to maintain high availability. We did that. But someday, when the hardware has just had it, you just have to bite the bullet LOL and build a new system!

I remember my co-workers always talking about how ancient some of the hardware was in some of the FAA systems (vacuum tubes when nobody even knew what those were.LOL) and how people on first sight would say my “Wow my personal PC has more power than that?”. But I think it is just that if the system managers of extremely critical systems have a very reliable system, and as long as they can keep it running with high reliability and availability even though it’s ancient, they would rather postpone the throw of the dice for a new development. At least that’s what I remember.

But I guess a manager has to be careful. If he waits too long to start a new development he can get caught with a totally failed system. The ancient hardware just dies! LOL (One time we didn’t give the govt. enough heads up, we were out of spares, and we were forced to write an emulator on new hardware for a subsystem.)

But 8 inchers down in the missile silos - wow! That is interesting. Just hope all that stuff is in good working order. LOL
 
  #19  
Old 05-20-14, 11:28 AM
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Read years ago that the FAA was buying their tubes in Czechoslovakia because it had one of the only factories making them.
 
  #20  
Old 05-20-14, 12:00 PM
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That is really something. I wonder how many people know that? I didn't.

I should have also said in post 18 that I think the trend has been for a pretty long time to use architectures and hardware that can be scaled up. Not a lot of the custom hardware that the government has done for such a long time and was locked into. I'm pretty sure that's the case.

But still the portability problem exists.

But like the missile silo case, there are probably still some really old hardware squirreled away somewhere to act as spares. So a few of those ancient systems continue to tick.LOL
 
  #21  
Old 05-21-14, 03:43 AM
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Russia and China make vacuum tubes. In fact, from what I've read, quite a bit of Russia's electronic equipment still relies on vacuum tubes. They are used in my guitar amplifiers. Nothing sounds like a tube amp.

I have two iterations of Zip drives, a couple of 3.5 floppy drives, some old video cards, an EISA sound card and some other stuff from the 90s. Don't know why I held on to it all these years. I have long since transferred all of the data to other media. Nostalgia isn't the reason. Somehow I can't see my self fondly caressing the caps & chips on that sound card.
 
 

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